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Flooding Hits South Carolina, North Carolina Update: 2 Killed in Flash Floods

By Eric Zerkel
Published: August 11, 2014

Heavy rain from a stalled frontal system deluged the Carolinas on Saturday, killing one person, causing heavy street flooding and prompting water rescues.

A man and a woman were killed, after the pair were sucked into a storm pipe in Greenville, South Carolina, trying to flee their car in rising floodwaters Saturday night.

Greenville County Coroner Parks Evans said that the body of Kimberly Jackson, 36, was found Sunday in a drainage pipe near Cross Hollow Road, more than a mile downstream. Divers finally recovered the body of Timothy Sullivan, 39, Monday, in a pond between Haywood and Halton Roads, WYFF reports.

According to weather.com meteorologist Ari Sarsalari, almost 3 inches of rain fell in the Greenville area from 10 p.m. to 12 a.m. local time. The rainfall caused the Reedy River, which flows through downtown Greenville, to rise from 3 feet to nearly 11 feet, according to the Associated Press.

Multiple road closures were reported, including I-85 southbound in the Greenville area, but the road was reopened early Sunday morning, Fox Carolina reports.

Two people were also injured in Greer, South Carolina, to the north of of Greenville, after their cars fell into a hole left behind after a small bridge washed out.

In Pender County, North Carolina, emergency officials rescued six elderly residents from an apartments by boat after from rising waters crept into their residences. There were no injuries.  Pender County Fire Marshal Charles Newman told local media that the rescues were carried out as a precautionary measure.

Several local thoroughfares were also declared 'impassible' because of rising water, according to WECT.  Two such roads include Country Club Dive and Azalea Drive in Hampstead, North Carolina,  where a large sinkhole formed and swallowed portions of the road. 

A variety of flood watches and warnings remain in effect for South Carolina and North Carolina, with more storms in the forecast for Sunday.

Here's just a sampling of photos from the incident last night: 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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