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Firefighters Battle 8-Alarm Blaze in East Boston

Liz Burlingame
Published: April 9, 2014

An 8-alarm fire was reported in East Boston Wednesday. (Photo courtesy of the Boston Fire Department: bostonfire/twitter)

Weeks after two Boston firefighters were killed trying to extinguish a 9-alarm fire on Beacon Street, firefighters worked to control an 8-alarm fire in East Boston Wednesday night.

The blaze heavily damaged a two-and-a-half-story wood-frame house and spread to a car and two nearby houses, the AP reports.

New England Cable News reports Fire Commissioner John Hasson said at the scene that the fire started in the basement of a two-family house on Lexington Street. The heavy fire was contained to that house.

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Hasson said everyone was accounted for. The only injury reported was to a firefighter who had a minor eye injury.

Similar to last month's double-fatal fire on Beacon Street, firefighters faced windy conditions, said weather.com meteorologist Chrissy Warrilow. "Sustained winds of 15 mph were blowing from the northwest in Boston, at times gusting up to 30 mph."

The fire department had called for eight alarms to bring in extra equipment after the fire was reported just before 7:30 p.m. in the tightly built neighborhood near Logan Airport. It was brought under control before 9 p.m.

Below are the latest reports on the fire from social media.

 


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