Share

Deadly Flooding Kills Dozens in Argentina

April 3, 2013

DANIEL GARCIA/AFP/Getty Images

There was so much rain a parking garage flooded in the neighborhood of Nunez in Buenos Aires.

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — The governor of Argentina's Buenos Aires province says at least 46 people have died in flooding due to torrential rains in his provincial capital. That increases the overall death toll from three days of rains to at least 52. More than a quarter-million people remain without power in Argentina's capital and surrounding province. Nearly 1 million people live in and around the city of La Plata and many are struggling to recover even as more rain is in the forecast. Gov. Daniel Scioli said Wednesday that emergency workers are focusing on the people most in need.

Gov. Daniel Scioli said many of the deaths involved people who drowned after trying to take shelter in their cars in Tolosa, an area of the provincial capital of La Plata.

"Such intense rain in so little time has left many people trapped in their cars, in the streets, in some cases electrocuted. We are giving priority to rescuing people who have been stuck in trees or on the roofs of their homes," Scioli told a news conference. La Plata "has never seen anything equal" to this disaster, he added.

DANIEL GARCIA/AFP/Getty Images

A car shows signs of having spent time under water following floods in the neighborhood of Nunez in Buenos Aires.

The rains also flooded the country's largest refinery, causing a fire that took hours to put out. The refinery has suspended operations as a result, and Argentina's YPF oil company said it has an emergency team evaluating how to get it restarted again.

The rains — almost 16 inches (400 millimeters) in about two hours — hit provincial La Plata after causing widespread flooding and power outages and killing six people in the city of Buenos Aires the day before.

"This is the biggest weather-related disaster in the city's history," Casals said. He said more than 1,500 people had been evacuated, a number sure to grow through the day.

"There's no power in nearly the entire city," Casals said, adding that the water has "wiped out the downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods such as Tolosa, Elvira, Los Hornos, with as much as 2 meters (more than 6 feet) of water, and people are on their roofs."

Many of the evacuees slept in their cars overnight. Transportation and business of all kinds in the city were at a standstill.

YPF said no injuries were caused by the refinery fire, which it blamed on "an extraordinary accumulation of rainwater and power outages in the entire refinery complex."


Featured Blogs

More Water For California: New Enormous Water Works Programs Are Expensive

By Dr. Jeff Masters
April 18, 2014

From November 2013 - January 2014, a remarkably extreme jet stream pattern set up over North America, bringing the infamous "Polar Vortex" of cold air to the Midwest and Eastern U.S., and a "Ridiculously Resilient Ridge" of high pressure over California, which brought the worst winter drought conditions ever recorded to that state. A new study by Utah State scientist S.-Y. Simon Wang found that this jet stream pattern was the most extreme on record, and likely could not have grown so extreme without the influence of human-caused global warming.

A Warm Winter in Alaska

By Christopher C. Burt
April 18, 2014

In contrast to much of the contiguous U.S., the National Weather Service (NWS) in Alaska noted in a post this week that Alaska has enjoyed its third warmest ‘winter’ on record for 2013-2014. The period of time they are calling ‘winter’ is for the six months of October 2013 through 2014. Here are a few details.

I am a Failed Father

By Shaun Tanner
April 17, 2014

Being a father is very hard! I know, I sound like a whiner, but I felt especially bad this week when I caused my daughter to miss the lunar eclipse.

Polar Vortex, Global Warming, and Cold Weather

By Stu Ostro
January 10, 2014

Some thoughts about the recent viral meme(s).

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.

Astronomical VS. Meteorological Winter

By Tom Niziol
March 1, 2013