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Deadly Avalanche Kills Two At Russian Ski Resort Used in Sochi Olympics

March 24, 2014

AP Photo

This 2011 photo shows downhill skiers on a slope at the newly built Rosa Khutor ski resort in Krasnaya Polyana near the Black Sea resort of Sochi, southern Russia.

An avalanche at a ski resort in Sochi, Russia used in the recent Winter Olympic Games, buried six skiers, killing two Sunday.

The skiers were in the middle of a run at Rosa Khutor Alpine Resort, used in the Alpine skiing competitions at the Winter Games, when the avalanche overtook them. Four of the skiers escaped from the avalanche unharmed, according to resort officials, but two women who were dug out of the snow did not survive.

The resort had just reopened to the public Saturday after the conclusion of the Paralympics. According to the Associated Press, the skiers were in the middle of the Labrint run, one of the most difficult slopes on the course.

Resort officials were still trying to determine what caused the avalanche.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

MORE: Photos From the Sochi Winter Olympic Games

Switzerland's Iouri Podladtchikov celebrates after his second half pipe run during the men's snowboard halfpipe final at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park, at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014, in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. Podladtchikov won the gold medal. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)


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