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Daredevil Photographer Captures Surreal Lightning Strikes (PHOTOS)

August 13, 2014

Severe weather chaser and photographer Marko Korosec uses his skills to find himself in the right place at the right time to capture incredible images of lightning.

Marko, a Slovenian born meteorologist, took these photos during the past six months in Slovenia, Northern Italy, and the Adriatic Sea.

In an interview with Caters News Agency, Marko says, "I am a meteorologist by profession and have collected a deep knowledge of meteorology throughout the past 15 years, so in short, I do my own forecasts and analysis to predict where will be the best place to be on a specific day I want to chase." The unpredictable nature of lightning has meant a few close calls for Marko, but safety remains his main priority. He has no issues moving his location if a storm compromises his safety.

(MORE: 10 Spectacular Clouds (PHOTOS))

On his 500px account Marko wrote, "I simply love Mother Nature and sharing its beauties with everyone, being able to observe, study and photograph its natural wonders since my first touch with DSL-R camera back in late 90s." His interest in storm-chasing also blossomed at that time. The combination of the his two interests can be taxing though, as he is often out chasing storms for several days, but his passion for his work gives him the energy to push through it. "It's a part of my life, my passion and it fascinates me more with each strike."

Click through the slideshow for more incredible images of lightning. View more of Marko’s work on his website or his Facebook page.

(MORE: Up Close and Personal (PHOTOS))

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