Flash Flooding in Coastal Carolinas Deluges Streets, Prompts Water Rescues

By Allie Goolrick
Published: August 9, 2014

Heavy rain from a stalled frontal system deluged the Carolinas on Saturday, causing heavy street flooding and prompting water rescues near Wilmington, NC and Charleston, SC. In Pender County, North Carolina, emergency officials rescued at least 6 people from rising waters and declared several local thoroughfares 'impassible' because of standing water, according to WECT.  

In Hampstead, North Carolina, at least one sinkhole opened up in a residential area, according to local media reports: 

Photos on social media showed flooded streets and cars submerged to their roofs in water. 

A flash flood warning was in effect for Pender County until 9:15 p.m.

A flash flood watch, meaning flash flooding is possible, was posted through Sunday for 16 counties in central North Carolina and six in northeastern South Carolina. The National Weather Service in Raleigh said the stalled boundary will bring moderate to heavy rainfall through the weekend. By late Saturday, as much as 2 inches had fallen in some areas.

The Weather Service also posted coastal flood advisories from Wilmington south through Georgia. It warned that high spring tides, winds blowing on shore and the full moon could combine to cause moderate coastal flooding Saturday night.

Below are your photos from social media: 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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