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22-Pound Oregon Cat Traps Family, Who Call Police

By Allie Goolrick
Published: March 12, 2014

Associated Press/Lee Palmer

This photo provided by Lee Palmer shows Lux, a 22-pound part-Himalayan cat that attacked a seven-month old baby.

An angry 22-pound house cat named Lux had a minor brush with the law on Monday after he attacked a baby and forced his owners to barricade themselves in a bedroom of the family's Portland, Oregon apartment.

Oregon Live reports that Portland police officers were dispatched to the residence just before 8 p.m., according to Sgt. Pete Simpson, a spokesman for the Portland Police Bureau.

Lux's owner Lee Palmer told the emergency dispatcher that the 4-year-old part-Himalayan cat attacked his 7-month-old child after the baby pulled the cat's tail. The child suffered a few scratches on the forehead.

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The real trouble started when Palmer swatted the cat "in the rear" to protect his child. Palmer says the animal went ballistic — leading Palmer and his girlfriend to lock themselves, their baby and the family dog in the bedroom for safety.

On the 911 call, the cat can be heard screeching in the background of the call as Palmer says in a panicked voice: "He's charging us. He's at our bedroom door." Palmer also tells the dispatcher that Lux has a "history of violence."

When officers arrived, the crafty feline attempted to evade capture by darting into the kitchen and jumping on top of the refrigerator. Officers were able to capture the animal with a dog snare and get him into a pet carrier.

“The cat remained behind bars in the custody of the family. Officers cleared the scene and continued to fight crime elsewhere in the city,” the Portland Police Bureau told Oregon Live.

Despite the attack, Lux's owners say they're not giving up on their pet and are getting it medical attention and therapy, the Associated Press reports.

Palmer said he's taking the feline to a veterinarian and that a pet psychologist also is due at the house to pay a visit to Lux.

"We're not getting rid of him right now," Palmer said. "He's been part of our family for a long time."

The cat attack story gained national attention after police put out a news release about it Monday. Palmer says the family has had proposals from people wanting to adopt Lux, but the family is not taking them up on it.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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iWitness user barkit from Lewistown, Ill., sent this picture of their cat, DS, enjoying the snow.


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