Caulk Boots

By: ycd0108 , 2:33 PM GMT on March 29, 2012

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April Fools:
The big saw is running again!
"Six feet deep in Big Muddy
And the big fool said: "Push on!"
As usual there is a story:
Michael worked with me on the first house I built here on the Island. He had been planning to take a boat building course and I was renting the top floor of his house with him in the basement. I had the job but no crew and few tools so I went down and said:
"Why don't you come and work with me and we'll both learn something?"
We drove together for a number of years. One sunny morning we finished our coffee and were walking back onto the new floor we planned to put some perimeter walls up on and CBC radio started playing Alan Stivel's "Suite des Montagnes".

Anyhow Mike and I started stepping around on the new floor.
He left us 24 years ago and designated the big saw and the Alaska Mill to Ron (I am still using his Hitachi Planer and Makita router), who I went on to ride with for 14 years.
Previous:
Pronounced: Cork.
Tloml brought a pair of these boots home for me yesterday. I don't mind sawing up logs but I hate shopping. Haven't worn corks since I worked on log booms in the late '70s so it takes a bit of getting used to: your foot won't slip is the good news - last thing you need on a pile of logs is a slip. The bad news is: your foot really won't slip - that can also be a problem 'cause logging often requires some fancy footwork.
I had two painful lessons way back then:
1) I had been wearing light running shoes while operating the skidder and gotten used to hopping aboard with decent traction on the steel surfaces. After dancing around wearing the corks on the floating logs - you have to stay in motion because most of the logs will sink under you or roll - I jumped on to the plate steel fender of the skidder. The corks scratched the paint but did not create any friction at all. A "face plant" on the back of the skidder was lesson #1.
2) You get used to the boots gripping on wet logs. I was back on the skidder with runners on and needed to secure the boom logs to shore. I was using the dance step learned wearing corks and all went fine till the runners hit a portion of the log that had been debarked. Luckily it was shallow water but I still don't know which face plant is worse - the fender of a skidder or a large log in waist deep water. Took me a while to find my glasses.
Here is a link to some poetry by and about some loggers:
http://www.wdmoore.ca/mp3/disc1/caulkboots.html

Sawmill (ycd0108)
For Ylee
Sawmill
"Cold Deck" Dawn (ycd0108)
Waiting for the sun to warm the frost

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58. linjina
9:19 AM GMT on May 30, 2012
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Member Since: May 30, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 70
57. ycd0108
3:57 PM GMT on April 06, 2012
Morning Shen:
That's the fellow. He tried to show me a few things on the old Hawaiian guitar but I make a better listener than musician. Fair amount of local jargon in that song.
Smiley = Tyee = Spring Salmon for instance.
Rob: Big Circ is great for those deep cuts but I had some trouble with the blade wandering - the large diameter thin kerf blade heats up in a long rip and once it starts off course it won't come back.I can not blame the tool for the wavey cuts and I figured out some tricks to control the line. This project is all experimentation anyway and I did get some usable lumber.
The biggest saw I built was capable of ripping 6" but I had to place guides near the forward teeth and spray water on the blade to cool it. Power came from a 14 HP "China" diesel.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
56. RobDaHood
2:15 PM GMT on April 06, 2012
Nice work on the lumber!
The only circular saw I've used that big was a massive wormdrive beast. Man, it would cut, but I found it a rather intimidating beast.

Interesting tunes!
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 98 Comments: 32813
55. ShenValleyFlyFish
4:47 AM GMT on April 06, 2012
Quoting ycd0108:
Shen:
Gonna have to find my friend, Ken Hamm's "Duncan and Brady". I've got it on the MP3 in the pickup.
Gets me to work some days.

This the fellow?

Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
54. ycd0108
4:21 AM GMT on April 06, 2012
Shen:
Gonna have to find my friend, Ken Hamm's "Duncan and Brady". I've got it on the MP3 in the pickup.
Gets me to work some days.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
53. ShenValleyFlyFish
3:33 AM GMT on April 06, 2012
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
52. ycd0108
10:30 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Lead Belly did this one as well:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSHvXOHGC7o
"Duncan and Brady" search should bring it up.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
51. ycd0108
9:02 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
I can't believe it BriarCraft!
That video is exactly the DIY advice I needed.
I had a few old "Crosscut Saws" but I gave them to the local pub for decorations years ago.
Red Green purty well sums it up,though:
"Start slow and speed up later!"
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
50. BriarCraft
8:27 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
You've just got to figure out how to work smarter, not harder...

Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 83 Comments: 4179
49. ycd0108
4:37 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Music for melting frost:
http://holcombewaller.bandcamp.com/track/quappell e-valley-saskatchewan-2
Dang space in there!
Somehow I need to learn how to embed tunes.
Baby steps!
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
48. ycd0108
4:15 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Ylee:
I thought WU Photo Upload might have stamped that photo for some reason.
The boards are now racked under shelter - not before our "sit-a-dog" Jupiter could fling garden dirt all over them. Tloml was trying to coax him to "Dig, dig, dig!" to help roto till the mulch and the dirt flies "All Ways."
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
47. Ylee
3:52 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Nice boards, ycd! That does look like a goose, doesn't it?
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 96 Comments: 16004
46. ycd0108
3:13 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Thanks Bogon:
Takes me back to that deck and two goofy young carpenters dancing with a sledge hammer in each hand.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
45. Bogon
2:27 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Found several versions of this tune on the 'Tube.
None of them has great video. This one is at least seasonal.



I wonder, was the videographer sizing up this tree for its lumber potential?
Member Since: June 26, 2008 Posts: 79 Comments: 3742
44. ycd0108
1:54 PM GMT on April 05, 2012
Posted the picture above because I was wondering what the white goose artifact in the thumbnail was. Turns out to be a piece of tarp thrown back from the pile of horse manure mulch that will soon be roto tilled into the garden. the grey mesh over the image is the bug screen in my computer room window.
I'm going to leave it there (the photo) because I intend to stick pictures on my blog and then write about them.
I doubt that any new picture can be worse than this one.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
43. ycd0108
1:20 AM GMT on April 05, 2012
Afternoon Shen: I just paid attention to Leadbelly's first verse. There seem to be a number of verses there I have not listened to. Lyrics change but that tune was staple for the musical "get togethers' that I was familiar with as a child.
Kesey would have liked Wunderbolgs in my opinion. Scenes in his "Garage Sale" deal with imagining how to control extreme weather.
I'm working on qualifying as one of the "Old loggers" but mainly I have done so many risky moves I hope I know how to stay alive and not hurt anyone else.
When you are working alone you can take some risks but I had a good kid today piling limbs on the fire while I was skidding logs out of the hole with my pickup. The kid (twenty something) has worked with me a bit so I trust him to stay clear.
And he trusts me not to move till he can get there.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
42. ShenValleyFlyFish
5:17 PM GMT on April 04, 2012
Don't know about the economics of wood "North of the Arctic Circle" (It does run at the 49th // according to most folks from the US according to my DDD -dear departed dad- who passed on still a "Loyal Subject" leaving totally confused as to what a "patriotic citizen" is since I got tickets say I belong to 2 countries), but down here lots of folks want to "thin out" their woodlot find one of the crippled-up "Good Ol' Boys" with a stout son or two who can't just give up login cause its in their blood and it's all they know to do and get them to "bring em down" on shares. Course we're talking "Southern Hardwoods" here and I've been told you'd be better off selling it and buying "milled wood". Only trouble with "milled wood" is it's probably that skinny, twisted, soft grained, knotty, trash comes from some Georgia plantation no self respecting guy is going to use in something for themself.

Of course sounds like you might be turning into one of them "Busted-up Ol'Boys". Most of em seem happier than the average bear in spite of all their cussin and complaining.

Be careful, watch out for the widow-makers, Break a Leg or whatever it is you guys wear then spiky boots say to each other before you set out to try to kill yourself.

You've been making me think of 2 grand things.

Sometimes a Great Notion


Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
41. ycd0108
2:41 PM GMT on April 04, 2012
Ylee: I'm fairly sure you are correct regarding the economics: even with borrowed tools and wood laying on my lawn the value of the wood I got translates into low wages for exhausting work.
I try to pace myself by running through a tank of fuel to take a break but yesterday at about 1500 hours I simply ran out of gas while the saw was still rarin'.
The option that makes more sense it to set up or hire a vehicle to transport the logs to a small mill already set up. Then all you have to do is get the logs loaded and haul back the finished product.
Simply ordering a load of lumber delivered in the dimensions and quantity you need is way to easy and cheap.
That doesn't deal with the stuff in my yard, though.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
40. Ylee
9:07 AM GMT on April 04, 2012
I know lumber can be very lucrative, but it seems to me that unless you get some wood from an outside source and sell lumber on the side, you won't ever recoup the money spent on a mill, IMO!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 96 Comments: 16004
39. ycd0108
6:02 AM GMT on April 04, 2012
Evening Ylee: The mills can be less than 10 grand and the price doesn't come down unless the mill is beat. Trouble is that the mill is the easy part. You still will need to get the log to the mill and take the lumber and the waste away. There is a lot of waste and the lumber is heavy and needs to be stored well or used quickly. The only reason it interests me is that my SIL is seriously considering going together on one. He has a "cold deck" of logs now in his yard and most are not worth hauling to a regular mill or hiring a mobile - we have both done that. Woulda, shoulda, coulda got a mill years ago.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
38. Ylee
3:09 AM GMT on April 04, 2012
Buying a portable mill sounds expensive! Maybe there's a good used one out there?

Love the big 16 incher! You keep on posting those pics, and I may have to go and do something silly! With wood, that is! :)
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 96 Comments: 16004
37. ycd0108
1:23 PM GMT on April 03, 2012
My morning read from BBC:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17547694
The question of whether (or when) artificial intelligence can be developed which matches human intelligence might be moot. For one thing: my two year old iPod is much "smarter" than I am already.
The evolution of intelligence seems to me to be more likely to involve the cooperative interface between the human and "artificial" rather than a competition.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
36. ycd0108
5:26 AM GMT on April 03, 2012
Just off the phone with one SIL and he's almost as crazy as me but younger and stronger. He's got the same dilemma around his place: we want the sunlight so some trees have to come down. Most is only good for firewood but good portions of the butts are sound "tight Knot" and should be milled. We have been talking about buying a portable mill. I used a mill way back with a Cat diesel driving a 54" circular blade - built most of my book cases and all of the window trim from the "Off-cuts" we call that stuff "Fall Down". Now most mobile mills (and all of the commercial mills) are band saw with a much finer kerf. When I take an 1 5/8" slab with the Alaska Mill the Kerf is 3/8". Band saw kerf is less than 1/8". This makes a big difference in what you get from the log and how much waste you have to clean up.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saw
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
35. ycd0108
2:50 AM GMT on April 03, 2012
You got it Rob:
This saw paid for itself the day it was purchased over 20 years ago. We were prefabbing post and beam cabins and needed to cut through many 6x6" posts. The boss watched us cut and flip the beams and have to finish the cut with an handsaw. He didn't say much but returned from town with that saw in an hour or so. What we had done before was maybe 1/4 of the total cuts we needed and in about 3 hours we were done. Back then we were not paid big wages and the saw was expensive but worth it.
The "boss" is still a friend and it was his idea for me to borrow the Big Circ.
Once you get used to the exagerated torque on both start and stop because of the size of the blade: 16" diameter at 3500 RPM has a lot of that, it's great!
Add: I think there is some gearing down in there. 3500 RPM at 16" might cause ionization and you want the tooth speed to be within certain limits.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
34. RobDaHood
12:06 AM GMT on April 03, 2012
Quoting ycd0108:
We'll see if this works and I'll post a picture of the end product.


Looking forward to it. Be safe and have fun!
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 98 Comments: 32813
33. ycd0108
12:04 AM GMT on April 03, 2012
This here sawmilling is cutting into my blogging time:
Rob: "back home" often means 1955 as well.
Ylee: That's what they said at the local store when the cash machine crashed.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
32. ycd0108
11:56 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
Afternoon Shen: Good point there! I was going to call my construction advice blog: BYFIU.
BriarCraft: Your sense of humor has recovered already.
The cartoon is too true. My endeavors lately would be about as far from "Eco Friendly" as one can get. Since I'm as NIMBY as the next person I don't want a "Stump Ranch" in my back yard. I have flown by helicopter around this area and our little second growth forest stands out in the cleared areas around our place. One younger neighbor cleared a trail for his "Dirt" bike and we walk the dogs there. Logging and nature trails are somewhat in conflict on a small property (or even a big Province).
So I'll be careful out there.
I picked up another "Big" saw just now: Makita circular saw with a 16" blade. Now that I've got some slabs I need to rip them into planks. We'll see if this works and I'll post a picture of the end product.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
31. Ylee
11:22 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
120 if you pay by check......:)
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 96 Comments: 16004
30. RobDaHood
11:15 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
Quoting ShenValleyFlyFish:


They left off one:

If you tried to fix it yourself first, don't ask for an estimate.

That's 80.
100 is if you talk about how much better and cheaper it was "back home".
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 98 Comments: 32813
29. BriarCraft
11:07 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
Just be careful out there, okay? You're not as young as you used to was. And dangerous work like that is best done with someone else nearby.

Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 83 Comments: 4179
28. ShenValleyFlyFish
7:31 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
Quoting ycd0108:

There was a sign posted by the Marine Ways I used some years ago that listed the hourly charge:
"Labour: 20$ per hour
If you want to watch: 40$ per hour
If you want to help: 60$ per hour"


They left off one:

If you tried to fix it yourself first, don't ask for an estimate.
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
27. ycd0108
2:37 PM GMT on April 02, 2012
On the way home from the memorial last night two stores we stopped at could not accept interac debit or credit cards because there was no internet connection. We scrounged around for change in the car and found enough to pay for minimum purchases. We agreed that we should carry some cash for such situations.
When I booted this computer I could read WU blogs but could not log in. Seems to be fine now so:

Shore: Great Lego music video. "The guy with the most toys wins!" Eh?
Your learning curve with caulking is similar to mine. Early on the "Boss" came by and started to advise me how to caulk a vanity in one of a series of bathrooms we were finishing in a resort here. I was so frustrated by that time I just handed him the gun.
Masking tape should always be included in the worker's "Grab Bag".
There was a sign posted by the Marine Ways I used some years ago that listed the hourly charge:
"Labour: 20$ per hour
If you want to watch: 40$ per hour
If you want to help: 60$ per hour"
Pat: Monty Python Rules!
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
26. Patrap
10:22 PM GMT on April 01, 2012


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129089
25. shoreacres
10:05 PM GMT on April 01, 2012
Member Since: October 4, 2004 Posts: 205 Comments: 15288
24. shoreacres
9:37 PM GMT on April 01, 2012
Well, now I have it sort of sorted out in my mind, although much of this machinery is beyond my ken.

What I do know is that, where caulk is concerned, I need more than boots. Full body suits is more like it. Certainly gloves. When I first began learning to caulk on the boats, it was a sight to behold. It was expensive, too, as I wasted more than I got down properly. Finally, I learned to tape ahead of time, and that helped a good bit. Then I learned how to stay out of my own way, and that helped even more.

Eventually, I figured out that staying out of my own way might be a transferable skill. That was good, too.
Member Since: October 4, 2004 Posts: 205 Comments: 15288
23. ycd0108
4:14 AM GMT on April 01, 2012
That's on my list now, Reno:
Got to go to a memorial for an old fellow Ranter tomorrow - there are only two others I will say are better Ranters than I: my brother in law and "Bargepole" from Punch magazine. The owner of the Malle House here rants as "Slightly Corked" on:
http://www.ladysmithdowntown.com/members/take5/ and on about good wines. So I guess there are quite a few that are better but how many of them can still lift an 090 with the Alaska Mill bolted on I don't know.
Once I get the machine to start again I'll be much more confident.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
22. RenoSoHill
2:37 AM GMT on April 01, 2012
BC- Great video - this ol' pencil neck can learn a thing or two on this site! YCD re-load your picture it is in the gallery sideways. I came here to find out what it was all about!
Member Since: December 12, 2009 Posts: 7 Comments: 11071
21. ycd0108
1:41 AM GMT on April 01, 2012
BriarCraft: I 'm not sure if you are reading my mind (Good luck there, I don't understand most of it) but I took this latest photo about an hour ago. Once it's approved it should show up by the boots.
Funny thing happened on my way to the next cut, though:
I'm fairly confident and careful with the any power tool and the 090 is about as powerful a machine as most strong young men would wish to use.
Ahem! I am not young and don't believe in body building when there is logging and firewood cutting and splitting and hauling and stacking all available in my yard. But I have come to note that I can hurt myself simply lifting too much or holding an awkward position while pushing a roaring saw.
So the picture is the set up for the second cut and when I went to start the saw the starter chord whips out too easily without actually turning the motor. I have already spent a while dealing with Rotator Cuff injury so this unexpected easy pull that hits a full stop at the end of the chord is Not a good thing - my O.T./P.T. advises against such activities.
I have to assume you are recovering well.
Great to have you visit!
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
20. BriarCraft
9:50 PM GMT on March 31, 2012
Got a kick out of your two face-plant stories. What's a versatile fella like yourself to do? With all those laces, changing shoes wouldn't be quick or convenient.

Not being a logger myself, I gradually came to the understanding that you're embarking on something more serious than getting up some firewood. Having never heard of an Alaskan mill before, I had to go do some investigating. I now think this is what you're up to:



Am I right? If so, I hope you'll take a photo now and then to show how your project is going.
Member Since: June 21, 2004 Posts: 83 Comments: 4179
19. ycd0108
8:27 AM GMT on March 31, 2012
Went way down south to Chemainis this evening. The small theatre there was having a performance of "All Shook Up" from Joe DiPietro.
I was delightedly entertained!
There is something about "live" performance that makes a difference. "Live" TV just can not do it. It seems that a couple of things have to mesh:
Warm bums on seats and some actors prancing about are essential. Decent writing and hard work on the part of the crew are also necessary. Talent in the performers helps. When this comes together the "show" is good. This one was.
Gotta say I volunteered as "stage manager" for a couple of years for a local Drama group and attempted to act in a Farce called "Three Philosophers and an Ass".
Took weeks of rehearsals and fell flat.
T'wasn't that we did not try hard - we did.
I'm guessing we did not have the talent the kids tonight had.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
18. ycd0108
11:15 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
I had to accept it as well - last time I sanded and "Diamond Coat"ed that floor I had to do it while she was away for more than a week.
But some of the docks and crew boats up here had sacrificial boards so you could amble about just about anywhere. Quite often the cabin you stayed in had floors that were so well perforated you had to put the boots on to get to the can.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
17. RobDaHood
10:53 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Quoting ycd0108:
Looks like you pinned it Rob: I often wondered myself - now we need to figure out why that sticky stuff in tubes is called "caulking".
It started raining here so I came in with only 1/4 pickup load of fire wood. I found I can drive the truck with the corks on but Tloml won't let me wander around on the hardwood floor wearing the boots.

Sorry man, but I can't argue with her on that point!
LOL
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 98 Comments: 32813
16. ycd0108
10:41 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Looks like you pinned it Rob: I often wondered myself - now we need to figure out why that sticky stuff in tubes is called "caulking".
It started raining here so I came in with only 1/4 pickup load of fire wood. I found I can drive the truck with the corks on but Tloml won't let me wander around on the hardwood floor wearing the boots.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
15. RobDaHood
9:09 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
I gotta admit, you do have a way of coming up with attention grabbing blog titles.

"What the heck? You gotta have a special pair of boots to use a caulking gun in Canada? What's up with that?"

Then I read the entry and all became clear. But I did wonder about the origin of the term. Maybe it comes from the name for studs on horse shoes?
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 98 Comments: 32813
14. ycd0108
8:18 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Dear Abby, dear Abby: You won't believe this:
http://www.lyricsfreak.com/j/john prine/dear abby _20074810.html
I just borrowed two old chainsaws with ripping chains and "Alaska Mills" attached. Some of the trees are too good to just make firewood and I need some cedar boards to renew the sun deck. I try not to start a project with less than two saws.I whinge about the pain if I can even start the old Stihl 090 but I'm going to take John's "Dear Abby" advice and
"Stop wishin' for bad luck
And knockin' on wood!"
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13. Patrap
3:06 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
LOL..
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12. ycd0108
3:06 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Pat:
Tloml just got up so I cranked the sound on that one.
She would not believe it was them until the tune breaks in to Rock and Roll!
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
11. Patrap
2:57 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Baby, ooh, b-baby, mm-gon' bring iton hometo you
I've got that ticket, I got that load
Join up, gone higher, all aboard
I'm-a take my seat, a-right way back
Ooh, yeah, a-watch this train roll down the track
Gonna bring it on home, mm-bring it on hometo you
Watch out, watch out, make room

Try to tell you baby, whatcha tryin' to do
Try to love me, baby, love some other man, too
Bring it on home, bring it on home

Went a little walk downtown, honey, messed'n got back late
Found a note there waitin', it said, daddy, I just can't wait
Bring it on home, bring it on ho-wome
Bring it back home, bring it back home to me, baby

Tell you, pretty baby, love, you mess me 'round
I'm gonnna give you lovin', baby, gonna give you more
Bring it on home, bring it on home

Sweetest little baby daddy ever saw
I'm gonnna give you lovin', baby, I'm gonna give you more
Bring it on home, bring it on home
Bring it on home, alright

Bring it on home, bring it on home to you


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129089
10. ycd0108
1:14 PM GMT on March 30, 2012
Morning Ylee:
Francis Bacon said: "He that hath taken wife and children has given hostages to fortune for they are impediments to great enterprise."
Or something like that.
How would he know if he wasn't in the position we find ourselves?
I'm thinking that without them I would have ended up on Skid Row or worse.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650
9. Ylee
9:01 AM GMT on March 30, 2012
There's lots of things we could've done if it weren't for family responsibilities, at least I know I could've! :)

I probably would've moved out west at some point, maybe gave New Mexico a go.

Like the boots! Could've used them three years ago after the big ice storm!
Member Since: February 3, 2011 Posts: 96 Comments: 16004
8. ycd0108
4:14 AM GMT on March 30, 2012
Shen: You are as bad as I am. Welcome home.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 182 Comments: 4650

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About ycd0108

Now looking at the potential of humans (including myself) with regard to understanding complex natural phenomena.