Northeast Weather Blog

Pattern Change - Companion Gardening

By: sullivanweather, 3:42 PM GMT on April 25, 2008





Garden Series

Blog 1: Planning the Garden
Blog 2: Cool season crops


In the first two blogs of the gardening series we have discussed planning the garden for organic growing and cool season crops. This blog in the garden series will delve into companion gardening. Over the years gardeners have discovered that certain plants, when grown together, augment each other's performance or help to repel pests such as insects and caterpillars. However, there are certain combinations of plants that hinder each other. This blog will help you select which crops should be planted with one another to maximize the performance of your organic garden.


Vegetables

Beans - Beans come in two types (excluding lima beans), bush and pole. Bush beans are what their name implies, growing pods on bushy plants while pole beans grow as twining vines and will need support from a trellis, fence, posts, or anything they could wrap their vines around. One of the 'three sisters', beans add many benefits to the garden, including another member of the 'three sisters' - corn. Beans add nitrogen to the soil which corn, a very heavy feeder, will find beneficial. Bush beans should be planted in rows in between corn while pole beans can actually twine around the corn stalks, using them as support. Beans also have shown to be of aid when planted with cabbage, cucumbers, summer savory and especially carrots. Beans dislikes include any member of the onion family. Pole beans also are hindered by kohlrabi and sunflowers. In an odd twist, beets and bush beans grow well together, however, beets will not grow well pole beans.

Beets - As mentioned above, beets will grow well with bush beans but not pole beans. Onions are also of benefit to beets, as well as lettuce and cabbage. Kohlrabi also is friendly to the beet plant for they both require the same growing conditions and take nutrients from different levels of the soil. In addition to pole beans, beets to not grow well with field mustard.

Broccoli - A member of the cabbage family that does well growing amongst aromatic plants such as dill, camomile, sage, peppermint and rosemary. Vegetables that perform well with broccoli include, potatoes, beets and onions. Broccoli dislikes tomatoes, pole beans and strawberries.

Cabbage - Cabbage covers a wide range of vegetables which include broccoli, cauliflower, collards, kale, kohlrabi and Brussels sprouts. As discussed in the broccoli section, cabbage finds mutual benefit from a variety of aromatic herbs and vegetables which helps to repel pests such as the white cabbage butterfly. Cabbage is a heavy feeder and lots of compost should be worked into the soil before planting cabbage along with regular bouts of compost added into the top layer of soil or appropriate amounts of organic fertilizer. Cabbage dislikes pole beans, tomatoes and strawberries, so try to avoid planting them together.

Carrots - Carrots do best when planted along side tomatoes. Both crops serve as mutual benefit to one another by helping to add nutrients to the soil to help each other grow as well as tomatoes help to shade carrots from the heat of summer. Long bouts of hot weather will cause carrots to lose their sweetness and crispness. Carrots, when planted in summer under tomatoes for the fall, will survive the first several frosts and freezes being a cold tolerant plant. So once the tomatoes are killed off by frost they will have the benefit of full sun late in the season. Carrots enjoy the company of onions, leeks and herbs such as rosemary or wormwood which repels the carrot fly whose larvae attacks the young rootlets of carrots.

Cauliflower - Celery when planted amongst cauliflower will repel the white cabbage butterfly. For all other cauliflower info see cabbage

Celery - Celery grows well with leeks, tomatoes, cauliflower and cabbage. Remember that cauliflower and cabbage do not grow well together, so when planting the celery amongst tomatoes and cabbage/cauliflower make sure to put the celery in between those plants. Celery should be planted in a trench as opposed to a hill or row and could be planted in a circle so that the roots make a bed for beneficial garden dwellers such as earthworms.

Collards - Collards do well planted with tomatoes due to the propensity for tomatoes to repel the flea beetle the number one pest of collards. For all other information on collards see cabbage

Corn - Corn grows well amongst a wide variety of vegetables including, potatoes, peas, beans, cucumbers, pumpkins and squash. Squash varieties of crops gain benefit from the shade the stalks provide during hot summer days. Peas and beans grown with corn add nitrogen to the soil which is used by the corn, which are extremely heavy feeders. Tomatoes should not be planted with corn due to a common pest - the tomato fruitworm or the corn earworm. Cucumbers, pumpkins and squash planted around corn will help to deter raccoons, which find those plants offensive.

Cucumber - Cucumbers grow well with beans, peas and radishes. The beans add nitrogen to the soil which cucumbers will feed off of. The radishes repel cucumber beetles which are a very voracious pests that will decimate young cucumber plants. Sunflowers may also be grown with cucumbers as they will shade the plants preventing them from wilting during hot dry summer days. Cucumbers dislike potatoes and should be grown far apart in the garden due to a blight that cucumbers develop via the potato plant. Cucumbers also dislike aromatic herbs.

Eggplant - Eggplants are a delicacy of many pests which could very quickly eat their way through the leaves of the plant leaving them unable to photosynthesize, eventually killing the plant. Leaf hopper beetles and Colorado potato beetles are the main pests that will decimate the eggplant. Bush beans help to repel the potato beetle, while a hot pepper and garlic spray can be used to help repel other pests. To make the hot pepper spray, crush hot peppers and garlic cloves together and set inside water. After 24 hours strain and add enough water to make a spray that will be sufficient to mist your plants with an initial spray, after rainfalls or whenever pests arise. Use the strained peppers and garlic to add to the soil around the base of the plants which aids in pest prevention as well.

Kale - A member of the cabbage family, kale seeds can be sowed following the harvest of spring peas and beans and can be grown amongst cabbage or potatoes. For other information see cabbage

Kohlrabi - Grows best with onions and beets as well as aromatic herbs. Kohlrabi can also be grown with cucumbers for their roots occupy differing soil strata. Kohlrabi is also a heavy feeder, requiring lots of water and compost and will benefit from filtered sunlight. Kohlrabi dislikes tomatoes, pole beans and strawberries.


Leeks - Leeks grow well amongst celery and onions and share a mutual benefit with carrots, which repel the carrot flies that attack them. Leeks are heavy feeders and should be planted in a bed rich in humus and compost.

Lettuce - Lettuce grows well with strawberries, cucumbers and carrots. Radishes planted amongst lettuce make them especially flavourful. Since radish repel cucumber beetles a section of garden containing cucumbers, radish and lettuce are an unbeatable combination. Since lettuce is a cool season crop they will require shade during the height of hot summer afternoons. Onions grown alongside lettuce will help to control rabbits, if rabbits are a problem in your area.

Onions - The onion family, which includes chives, shallots, leeks and garlic, is a great companion for many common garden crops due to their aromatic properties and their inability to rob the soil of its nutrients. They grow well with all members of the cabbage family, beets, strawberries, tomatoes, lettuce and summer savory. Just about the only plants onions don't get along with are peas and beans.

Peas - This legume performs great in most gardens due to the shallowness of its roots and the fact that they don't need much soil amendment, although wood ashes help greatly in controlling aphids which can be a pest of peas. Peas grow well with a wide range in crops including carrots, radishes, cucumbers, turnips, potatoes, beans and corn as well as many aromatic herbs. However, they are detrimental to the onion family.

Peppers - Sweet bell peppers grow well with basil and need to be stakes or caged for their stems are quite fragile and can be broken by their heavy fruit. Hot peppers have little known pests, although some moth and butterfly larvae may attack a few of the fruits. Usually the plants produce enough fruits to lessen this issue. Hot peppers and sweet peppers should not be planted together as your sweet peppers will not be as sweet as originally planned.

Pumpkins - Although most pumpkins are grown for jack-o-lanterns come Halloween, pumpkins are a nutritious high yield squash that can be used as a side dish or in pies. Pumpkins grow quite well with corn and dislike potatoes.

Radish - Radishes can be a gardeners best friend if you particularly like cucumbers or any member of the Cucurbit family. Radishes protect these plants from the cucumber beetle which can decimate cucumber and cucurbit family crops which include the melons, pumpkins and squash. Radishes also prevent the two-spotted spider mite when grown with tomatoes. Radishes also grow well with kohlrabi, pole and bush beans. Lettuce makes radishes more tender while garlic juice prevents disease. Radishes do not grow well with hyssop and should not be rotated with members of the cabbage family.

Squash - These members of the cucurbit family will find benefit when planted with radish for they deter cucumber beetle infestations. Squashes will also find benefit from being planted next to nasturtiums.

Tomatoes - Tomatoes and hot peppers are perhaps the most widely studied plants and much is known about them. Tomatoes grow well with chives, parsley, onions, basil, marigolds, nasturtiums and carrots. Garlic will prevent red spider mite infestations while stinging nettle will improve their keeping quality. Tomatoes should not be planted next to peppers, members of the cabbage family, potatoes or fennel. Tomatoes should also be kept away from corn due to a common pest - the tomato fruitworm. Crushed tomatoes leaves along with water and a spoonful of cornstarch then strained will make for a fungicidal spray against black spot on roses. Smokers beware! Tobacco contains diseases that tomatoes are susceptible to, so wash your hands before handling tomatoes if you smoke.


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Soil moisture 0-200cm
Soil moisture 0-200cm

Soil temperature 0-10cm
Soil temperature 0-10cm

Soil temperature 10-40cm
Soil temperature 10-40cm


Kelvin temperature scale
273.15°K = 0°C


Current watches, warnings and advisories.


Eastern US current watches/warnings

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Regional Forecast

Synopsis - Issued 4/25 11:40am

A deep-layer ridge exists along the east coast of North America as a cut-off low pressure spins over the Western Atlantic and a deep trough digs into the Midwest in a highly meridional flow. Several waves of low pressure will ride out of the Plains into the Great Lakes region, gradually breaking down this ridge over the next 3-4 days, bringing an end to this stretch of unseasonably warm and dry April weather experienced over the previous 2 weeks in the Northeast. This warm and dry stretch of weather has led to the development of several brush fires as well as the start of the growing season a couple weeks early across many areas of the Northeast.

Short-term - Issued 4/25 11:40am

Unsettled weather will begin to impact the western half of the region later this afternoon as showers and thunderstorms, aided by a weak mid-level disturbance, develop along a warm frontal boundary that will stall over Pennsylvania and New Jersey as the deep southerly flow pushing ahead of the Midwestern trough weakens. These showers will weaken after losing daytime heating this evening into the overnight and dive southeasterly, becoming incorporated into the circulation around the cut-off low offshore. Further northeast on the lee side of the ridge axis clouds will be sparse in dry northwesterly flow out of Canada.

Mid-term - Issued 4/25 11:40am

Pre-frontal trough will move into the western half of the region tomorrow bringing a renewed chance for widely scattered showers and thunderstorms. 850mb temps warm to 10-13°C over the western half of the region so any breaks in the cloud cover will quickly warm temperatures and destabilize the atmosphere. Over the eastern half of the region there will be a slight increase in high level clouds, but it should be a rather pleasant day over New England. Temperatures will be 5-15 degrees above normal once again. By late Saturday afternoon into the evening the actual cold front will punch into the region with a linear development of showers and thunderstorms likely. Projected CAPE values will be modest, on the order of 500-1,000J/kg, winds aloft are light and any storms that do develop look to be progressive, so severe weather/flash flooding is unlikely. There is a chance for small hail with some of the stronger storms as freezing levels fall below 10,000 feet. As this line of thundershowers pushes into New England it will weaken as it runs into the ridge axis becoming nearly non-existent by Sunday morning. The second half of this weekend should be rather pleasant as the cold front washes out in the ridge axis as it heads offshore. A weak onshore flow along the coastal areas may make for a shallow marine layer which could hold temperatures down and keep cloud cover over these areas. Otherwise skies will be mostly sunny over the region. 850mb temperatures will range from 6-8°C area-wide making for temperatures several degrees above normal once again.

Long-term - Issued 4/25 11:40am

The next storm system will bring a pattern change to the Northeast as it develops over the Mid-Mississippi Valley region during the day on Sunday and quickly moves into the Great Lakes region Sunday night. The upper trough associated with the development of this storm system will take on a negative tilt as the storm pulls into Southern Canada Monday morning, tapping into a very cold pocket of air that will drive into the Northeast bringing an abrupt end to the above normal temperatures. Showers will develop out ahead of this storm system late Sunday night over the western half of the region, increasing in coverage and intensity during the day on Monday. As the sharp cold front pushes into the region on Monday convection will develop along it which could tap into some strong winds aloft (60kts @ 850mb level) bringing damaging wind gusts down to the surface. Behind the front much chillier air will move into the region which could bring snow showers to the higher terrain of the Adirondacks as early as Monday night. The front will continue northeastward into New England on Tuesday keeping rain chances going there cloudy skies over the remain of the region. With the cold pool aloft and strong late April sun, afternoon instability showers will develop, some of which may contain some graupel. Upper level low cuts-off over the region keeping clouds and showers in the forecast through Thursday. Higher terrain locations during the overnight may see snow showers mix in at times. By Friday temperatures will gradually improve as upper low looks to retrograde towards the Great Lakes region, however chances for precipitation will remain as another trough will approach from the west.


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Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

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Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover



___________________________________________________________

Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

---------------------------

Great Lakes SST's 4/15/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 04/15/2008.

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Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

4/4: Lake is beginning to thaw from the shores inward
4/6: Lake is now completely unfrozen.

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April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")
April 4th - 41°F/31°F....0.67"...0%....1.8"...(2")
April 5th - 46°F/37°F....0.08"...30%...0.0"...(>1")
April 6th - 46°F/36°F....0.00"...20%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 7th - 49°F/34°F....0.01"...30%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 8th - 59°F/29°F....0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 9th - 61°F/31°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 10th - 64°F/43°F...0.00"...100%..0.0"...(0")
April 11th - 55°F/43°F...0.32"...5%....0.0"...(0")
April 12th - 70°F/42°F...0.44"...70%...0.0"...(0")
April 13th - 46°F/32°F...0.00"...30%...0.0"...(0")
April 14th - 49°F/27°F...0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 15th - 55°F/26°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 16th - 65°F/25°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 17th - 75°F/31°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 18th - 83°F/40°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 19th - 81°F/48°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 20th - 61°F/47°F...0.00"...10%...0.0"...(0")
April 21st - 70°F/45°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 22nd - 72°F/38°F...0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 23rd - 75°F/44°F...0.04"...80%...0.0"...(0")
April 24th - 71°F/46°F...Trace...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 25th - 74°F/39°F...0.00"...60%...0.0"...(0")
April 26th - 64°F/52°F...0.09"...40%...0.0"...(0")
April 27th - 63°F/45°F...0.06"...20%...0.0"...(0")
April 28th - 50°F/42°F...1.19"....0%...0.0"...(0")
April 29th - 48°F/36°F...0.08"...40%...0.0"...(0")



Updated: 2:19 PM GMT on April 30, 2008

Permalink

Earth Day and photos - March in review

By: sullivanweather, 7:08 AM GMT on April 21, 2008

I'm taking a 2-3 day break from the gardening series to review March. The next gardening blog will return after Earth Day. I've also added a few of my favorite photos that I've uploaded to Wunderground.


Celebrate Earth Day!


April 22nd, 2008 will be the 39th annual Earth Day, celebrated to raise the awareness of environmental concerns and sustainable living. Since its inception in 1970, many environmentally friendly laws have been passed due in part to the awareness raised by Earth Day and the message sent therein.

This blog will try to convey some ideas that we all could do to lessen our impact on the environment and to make everyday Earth Day.

Recycle! Perhaps one of the biggest impacts that we could have on our environment is recycling. There's many everyday products that we all use that are recyclable that wind up in trash bins headed for the landfill. There's the common items we have all become accustomed to recycling such as newspapers, aluminum cans, plastic bottles, batteries, oil changes for your car, etc. But there's also things that we should recycle that haven't gotten the same attention over the years which have - computer parts, cell phones, home appliances all have huge impacts once in the landfill due to the chemicals they leech out into the ground which could possibly find it's way into groundwater drinking supplies.

Purchasing power. We all have the ultimate say on what we buy when at the store. Living in a country with a free-market society there's many options open to us when we go out and buy goods. Produce should be purchased from local growers that grow their produce using an organic process. Reading labels helps also. There's many products on store shelves whose packaging contains recycled materials. Choosing to buy such products over ones made from raw materials reduces our impact on the environment. Of course we can also lessen our dependence on store bought produce when we grow our own vegetables. Currently I'm running a series of blogs that promotes growing an organic vegetable garden. If planning on growing such a garden always choose plants from local nurseries and use organic fertilizers. There's many petrochemical fertilizers in the market which has negative impacts on the surrounding environment around your house and in the foods you decide to grow.

Plant a tree! Not only will growing a garden help to lessen one's impact on the environment, but planting trees and shrubs in and around your property, or where ever you're allowed to plant one helps. Arbor Day falls on the last Friday of the month of April and many communities have tree planting campaigns at local parks that one can get involved in. If planting a tree around your house make sure you do not plant one under power lines for they will most assuredly be cut down by your local DPW once it grows tall enough to interfere with those power lines. So choosing the proper location is paramount. Also make sure you choose a tree that's appropriate for your area. Refer to your USDA zone map to make sure you plant a tree that will survive the weather of your specific region. By signing up to a membership with the Arbor Day Foundation you will receive ten trees for free which will be a great way to help out the environment.

Pick up trash! It may not be any of one's business, but going out on your road to pick up roadside trash is a great way to help clean things up! Earth Day is a great time to involve yourself in such an activity for roadside weeds are usually low, if they have grown yet at all and trash is easily visible after the snowmelt. If partaking in such activity make sure to wear bright coloured clothing to make yourself visible to oncoming traffic and wear gloves. Towns also have such campaigns around this time of year where you can get together with members of your community to clean up roadside trash. Contact your local DPW to see if such programs exist within your community. If they don't SUGGEST IT!

Combine your trips in the car! The consumption of natural resources, namely fossil fuels, has become a hot topic recently especially in light of the global warming issue. So when traveling in your car try to combine trips. Do your grocery shopping on your way home from work or simply don't do any unnecessary traveling. The recent dramatic rise in the price of gas will curtail some of those behaviours but it’s something we can all do to lessen our consumption of these finite resources. Of course there’s other ways we could lessen our consumption of fossil fuels such as car pooling and buying hybrid or appropriate vehicles that have high fuel economies.

Write a letter! Somethimes words do speak as loud as actions. Write a letter to your local state or federal government representative and demand change aimed at advancing environmental concerns. You could also call your representative and speak to them directly.

Also, if you have an hour of free time I highly recommend that you listen to this lecture by Jeremy Rifkin aired March 4th on Northeast Public Radio about sustainability and advancing into the 21st century living green.


Garden Series

Blog 1: Planning the Garden
Blog 2: Cool season crops


Local weather - Bethel, New York

March Daily Weather Statistics


March 1st - 34°F/19°F....0.21"....20%..2.9"...(17")
March 2nd - 35°F/18°F....Trace....80%..0.1"...(16")
March 3rd - 53°F/17°F....0.03"....30%..0.0"...(15")
March 4th - 41°F/32°F....0.86"....0%...Trace..(9")
March 5th - 45°F/28°F....1.03"....5%...0.0"...(6")
March 6th - 45°F/21°F....0.00"....70%..0.0"...(5")
March 7th - 43°F/23°F....0.74"....30%..0.0"...(5")
March 8th - 41°F/28°F....1.33"....5%...0.1"...(4")
March 9th - 31°F/19°F....0.03"....40%..0.2"...(3")
March 10th - 34°F/16°F....0.00"....50%..0.0"...(3")
March 11th - 39°F/21°F....0.03"....80%..0.5"...(3")
March 12th - 36°F/26°F....0.01"....20%..0.1"...(3")
March 13th - 43°F/21°F....Trace....50%..Trace..(3")
March 14th - 47°F/27°F....0.19"....10%..0.0"...(3")
March 15th - 45°F/35°F....0.24"....40%..Trace..(2")
March 16th - 39°F/27°F....0.11"....20%..0.6"...(2")
March 17th - 44°F/21°F....0.00"...100%..0.0"...(2")
March 18th - 38°F/25°F....0.06"...20%...0.1"...(2")
March 19th - 43°F/32°F....1.21"....0%...Trace..(2")
March 20th - 45°F/27°F....0.06"...20%...0.3"...(1")
March 21st - 35°F/23°F....0.03"...40%...0.5"...(1")
March 22nd - 40°F/20°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(1")
March 23rd - 37°F/18°F....0.00"...60%...0.0"...(1")
March 24th - 41°F/18°F....0.00"...60%...0.0"...(1")
March 25th - 43°F/18°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(1")
March 26th - 49°F/31°F....0.14"...60%...1.1"...(2")
March 27th - 44°F/27°F....0.00"...0%....0.0"...(1")
March 28th - 37°F/28°F....0.43"...10%...Trace..(1")
March 29th - 36°F/20°F....0.00"...95%...0.0"...(1")
March 30th - 43°F/13°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(1")
March 31st - 42°F/29°F....0.38"...0%....0.3"...(1")


Temperatures



Average high temperature - 40.9°F
Normal high temperature - 39.5°F
High temperature departure - 1.4°F above normal

Average low temperature - 23.5°F
Normal low temperature - 23.6°F
Low temperature departure - 0.1°F below normal

Mean temperature - 32.2°F
Average mean temperature - 31.5°F
Mean temperature departure - 0.7°F above normal


Precipitation



March precipitation - 7.09"
Precipitation days - 21
Measureable - 19

Snowfall - 6.8"
Snow days - 17
Measureable - 12



March came in like a lion as a rather potent clipper system, which initially began to affect the region on the 29th of February, dropped significant snowfall across several areas on the heels of a bitterly cold arctic outbreak. In the Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania there was a few reports of over a foot of snow. Elsewhere across the Northeast amounts ranged from a trace to just a couple inches from southeast Pennsylvania across to central/southern New Jersey, Long Island and coastal southern New England. Further inland a solid 3-6 inches fell with areas across the North Country and Maine seeing amounts up to a foot. After the passage of the clipper system milder air moved into the Northeast ahead of a spring-like storm system which brought heavy rains to the southern two-thirds of the region and snow and/or mix to the north. Rainfall amounts of 1-3 inches were common with this system along with significant ice and snow accumulations across the north, which moved through on the 4-5th. After a brief break another significant weather maker would move through the region on the 7-9th. This was another spring-like storm system which brought heavy rains which led to flooding, especially to southern New England, south-central New York and the eastern half of Pennsylvania. In addition to the heavy rainfall a line of severe thunderstorms moved across southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and southern New York bringing wind gusts over 60mph. There was a cold side to this storm as well, but it was limited to northern Maine where over a foot of snow fell in Aroostook County. The jet stream flattened for the end of the second week of the month on into the first half of the third week with relatively minor systems to move through the region. The jet would buckle once again sending a powerful storm towards the region by the 19th of the month. Rain would be the dominate precipitation type across the southern half of the region which ice and snow would fall to the north. Ice accumulations were significant across much of upstate New York and central New England. Further north over Maine would be where the real show would take place as the system wrapped up over the Canadian Maritimes bringing blizzard conditions to much of northern Maine. Snowfall would total over a foot across the northern half of the state driven by winds up to 40-45mph. This storm would eventually form a deep closed low over the Maritimes and a zone of confluence from northern New York into central New England that would shear a rather potent clipper system from the Great Lakes across southern Pennsylvania and offshore the Mid-Atlantic states. This clipper, which brought over a foot of snow to the Great Lakes region, would bring 2-6 inches of snow across western/central Pennsylvania before moving offshore in a much weakened state. High pressure would control the weather over the region for the next several days before another weak clipper system brings rain and snow showers on the 26th of the month. Again, another weak low pressure would move through on the 28th bringing up to a half inch of rainfall and several inches of snow up north. A strong cold front would pass through the region on the 29th followed by another weak system for the 31st that would more snow showers to the higher terrain with rain over the lowlands.



National and Global Overview


The contiguous United States experienced slightly below normal temperatures during the month of March and above average precipitation. The average temperature for March was 42°F, which was 0.4°F below normal, ranking as the 52nd coolest on record which spans from 1895-2008. Precipitation averaged 2.6 across the country which was 0.2 inches above normal. Missouri had their 2nd wettest March on record with Pennsylvania and New York having their third wettest on record. In addition, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio all came in with top 10 wettest March's. The first 3 months of 2008 also ranked as the wettest on record for the state of New York and the 2nd wettest on record for Missouri and Pennsylvania.









Globally, March ranked as the 2nd warmest on record as much above normal temperatures spread across the Asian continent. In fact, land areas broke the land temperature record for the month of March averaging 3.2°F above normal beating out 1990 which saw temperatures of 2.92°F above normal.





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Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

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Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover



___________________________________________________________

Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

---------------------------

Great Lakes SST's 4/15/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 04/15/2008.

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Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

4/4: Lake is beginning to thaw from the shores inward
4/6: Lake is now completely unfrozen.

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April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")
April 4th - 41°F/31°F....0.67"...0%....1.8"...(2")
April 5th - 46°F/37°F....0.08"...30%...0.0"...(>1")
April 6th - 46°F/36°F....0.00"...20%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 7th - 49°F/34°F....0.01"...30%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 8th - 59°F/29°F....0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 9th - 61°F/31°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 10th - 64°F/43°F...0.00"...100%..0.0"...(0")
April 11th - 55°F/43°F...0.32"...5%....0.0"...(0")
April 12th - 70°F/42°F...0.44"...70%...0.0"...(0")
April 13th - 46°F/32°F...0.00"...30%...0.0"...(0")
April 14th - 49°F/27°F...0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 15th - 55°F/26°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 16th - 65°F/25°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 17th - 75°F/31°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 18th - 83°F/40°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 19th - 81°F/48°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 20th - 61°F/47°F...0.00"...10%...0.0"...(0")
April 21st - 70°F/45°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 22nd - 72°F/38°F...0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 23rd - 75°F/44°F...0.04"...80%...0.0"...(0")

Updated: 8:14 AM GMT on April 24, 2008

Permalink

Moderating trend this week - Cool season crops

By: sullivanweather, 11:57 PM GMT on April 13, 2008

Hazardous fire weather expected today and tomorrow.

The combination of warm temperatures, low humidities and dead vagatation from last year has set the stage for prime fire conditions. Winds around too high and have generally been under 15 mph, but due to the very low humidities unattended fires, cigarettes tossed out car windows or any other source of fire could set a wildfire. Be especially careful over the next two days if conducting any burns during the afternoon hours when humidity values will be at their lowest.





Garden Series

Blog 1: Planning the Garden


In the previous blog we discussed the steps needed to be taken early in the season to plan the garden and some of the work needed to prepare it for planting. Now that we're started the next steps that need to be taken involve basics in weed control, garden pests and fertilization of the soil keeping in mind that we want to put in a garden in accordance with nature (i.e. organic!). Also, this may be the time you'll want to start a compost heap or bin. Although we briefly discussed amending the soil in the previous blog I will try to provide additional information that will help you find the appropriate fertilizer to the corresponding crops. I also want to discuss some crops that you could start early in the season that are frost tolerant that perform best while the weather is still cool.

First we'll concentrate on amending the soil. Even though certain crops require specific soil types and fertilizers you'll want to have a basic fertile foundation soil. Before you go out and purchase bags upon bags of soil, look around the your yard for anything that you could use to amend the soil with. If you're into yard work there's likely a pile of grass clippings or leaf mulch that has been rotting in an unused corner of your yard that you've been dying to get rid of, here's your chance. Find the most broken down parts of this pile and mix it into the garden dirt to a depth of 6 to 8 inches. Now, grass clippings only go so far and if you plan on raising your beds you'll have to consider buying soil. The size of your garden will determine how much of what you'll need to purchase. I highly recommend adding peat moss to the soil, especially if your soil is sandy but even if it is hard clay. Peat moss helps to aerate soil and increase its ability to hold moisture. A 3.8 cubic foot bale will amend an area of 150 to 200 square feet and cost 8 to 10 dollars. Peat moss will come very dry, resemble saw dust and will have to be worked deep into the soil (top 6 inches) otherwise a heavy rainfall soon after adding it will likely wash it away or have it form clumps on the surface of the soil. Secondly, you'll also want to add peat humus to your soil, which is a dark coloured highly organic soil. Humus is the last stage organic material breaks down into and has many benefits in the garden. It helps with the breakdown of organic material and nutrients into forms that makes it easy for plants to uptake into their roots, moderates the acidity or alkalinity of soil and its dark colour helps to warm the soil temperature in spring. Peat humus can be found in 40 pound bags for around 2 to 3 dollars a bag. Add a 40 pound bag of peat humus for every 20-30 square feet of garden space and work into the top 4 inches of soil. In addition to the soil amendments, you'll want to add an all-purpose fertilizer to provide your plants a source of nutrients. Remember, buy an organic (non-chemical) fertilizer. I'll provide links at the bottom for such products.

There's only a few varieties weeds that over-winter and have begun to grow but soon there'll be many more weeds that will begin their growing season as soil temperatures are now beginning to rise aiding in their germination. There's several methods of weed prevention in the garden, however, there's only one I recommend - using a cultivator. Whether a long handled cultivator or a hand cultivator this method works best for it not only gets rid of the weeds but also aerates the soils. When using a cultivator be especially careful to get the weeds and not the crops or their roots which happens if one it not paying attention. For shallow rooted plants or root crops it is best to simply pull those weeds by hand. There's plenty of other ways of weed prevention, such as laying plastic or felt, but sometimes weeds still grow through and it also makes it impossible for the soil to get proper aeration and could also lead to mold/fungal disease. Again, the goal here is to avoid using any chemicals. I cannot stress this enough.

Now is also a time you may want to think about pest prevention so you won't have to deal with them later on in the year. As you were turning your soil you may have noticed white, brown or gray worms occasionally. These are cutworms, grubs and/or beetle larvae and will do significant damage to your young crops if left unchecked. Finding and killing these pests is not enough, there’s too many of them in the soil. A wonderful control method to rid yourself of these pests is beneficial nematodes, which can be bought from a website I will provide a link for at the bottom of the page. This company specializes in organic products that you could use in pest control and prevention and will send a great mail order catalogue. There's also a plethora of other garden pests that will show up as temperatures warm later into the spring and summer. There’s also certain flowers that you can plant in your garden that will attract natural predators that will feed on pests. Early in the season alyssum is a frost tolerant flowering annual that can be planted along garden borders to help get this process started.


Beets
Beets are a highly nutritious root crop which requires a high phosphorous, low nitrogen soil free of rocks or other debris. Beets also require a higher alkaline soil than most crops, so if you had used peat moss to amend the soil you may want to consider using lime to raise the soil PH as peat moss will gradually turn soil acidic. About a pound of lime per 20 square feet will do. Beets will tolerate frost so can be sowed directly into the garden a week or two before your last expected frost. Sow seeds an inch apart in rows about 1/2 inch deep and cover with fine soil. Once the seedlings appear you’ll want to thin every other plant. Seeds can be identified by their reddish purple colour. After the second and third sets of leaves appear you’ll want to thin again, leaving the strongest looking plants about 4-6 inches apart. Beets perform relatively poor if having to compete with weeds. Around the plants themselves you’ll want to pull the weeds by hand making sure not to disturb the root of the plant. Beets also need a steady supply of moisture. A lack of moisture will cause leaves to wilt and the root to not develop fully and become bitter to the taste. The entire plant is edible. Beet greens can be harvested early for a highly nutritious side dish, but leaving enough leaves on the plant to ensure proper food production. The root will normally mature in 50-70 days. Leaving beets in the ground too long will make their root become woody and tough in addition to losing flavour.

Broccoli
Broccoli is a highly versatile crop which performs best in the ‘cool season’ but there are varieties that can be grown where temperatures during the summer are routinely hot, although they will typically require shade during the hottest time of the day. A neutral PH soil is what broccoli prefers best although the crop will tolerate acidic or alkaline soil. Soil high in organic matter is preferred and should be fertilized with a high nitrogen fertilizer. Seeds should be sowed 1/2 inch deep about 2 inches apart and covered with fine soil. After seedlings appear and have grown their second sets of leaves thin plants to every foot apart. These plants also require a moist soil and grow very quickly once established. Harvest broccoli heads once the buds of the flowers begin to swell. You will only have a 2-3 day window to harvest the heads as the flowers will open quickly if left much longer. Cut the stalk about 4 to 6 inches below the base of the head. Broccoli will continue to produce side shoots for weeks afterwards into the summer.

Carrots
A root crop which needs deep, loose stone-free soil in order to maximize it’s performance. Carrots require full sun but will tolerate partial shade, especially if started late in the spring which will take the plant into the hottest time of the year. You may want to add the ashes from a wood fire to amend the soil as this adds potassium to the soil which promotes sweeter crisper carrots and will also ward off common pests to carrots. Too much nitrogen will make carrots mealy and fibrous roots susceptible to branching. Carrots can be directly sowed into the garden 1-2 weeks before the last expected frost as they will tolerate freezing temperatures to 28 degrees. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep, cover with fine soil and keep moist. Carrots are slow growers and will need to have weeds removed by hand until plants are several inches tall. After the plants reach 2-3 inches tall thin the plants to roughly 3 inch spacing. After 60-80 days remove some dirt from around the crown of the carrot. If the crown of the carrot is ~1 inch wide it is time to harvest, keeping in mind that leaving the crop in the ground too long will cause the carrot to become tough.

Cauliflower
A true cool season crop which doesn’t tolerate hot weather and can be started 4 weeks before the last frost. Cauliflower should be planted in fertile soil rich in organic material. Cauliflower is also a heavy feeder and will need additional fertilization every 3rd or 4th week. Seeds should be started indoors early in the season and transplanted outside once plants are 2 inches tall. Seeds can also be sowed directly into the soil soon after it can be worked (zones 3-4). Seedlings take about 4-6 weeks to appear so patience is required and another good reason to start indoors to make for easier identification. Cauliflower prefers evenly moist soil and should be kept well watered. Once heads begin to form in about 4 or 5 months you’ll have to blanch the heads by covering them with the leaves of the plant or a brown paper bag. This blanching process will help to keep the heads white in colour but do not leave the heads on the plant too long otherwise they will lose their crispness. Cauliflower leaves are also edible.

Celery
Celery is a mild flavoured cool season crop which is a dieters dream vegetable for it contains many vitamins and nutrients but virtually no calories. Celery prefers full sun and well-drained soil loosened to a depth of around a foot. Seeds should be started indoors 10 weeks before the last frost, but can be directly sowed into the garden in zones 3-4. If sowing seeds directly into the garden sow them just under the soil surface 2-3 inches apart and cover with fine soil. After seedlings are 2-3 inches tall thin to a spacing of around a foot apart. Celery has a long growing season and are heavy feeders, so make sure to apply fresh compost or fertilizer at regular intervals of around 4 weeks. Once plants are around a foot tall you’ll want to blanch them by wrapping their stalks with screening or paper. This helps to keep them tender.

Chard
Chard is a cool season crop related to the beet and used for the large leafy ‘greens’ chard which comes in many different colours. Chard is another vegetable which can be directly sowed into the garden very early in the season, 3-4 weeks before the last frost. Seeds should be sowed at a depth of 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at a spacing of 2 inches and covered with fine soil. To increase your harvest you can thin the plants to 4 inches apart until they’re 6 inches tall. Then remove every other plant in a final thinning to leave plants 8 inches apart, using the plant you had thinned. Harvest leaves throughout the season before they’re on the plant for too long as the stalks, or chard, of the leaves will become tough and the leaves will lose flavour. Also, use the chard leaves soon after harvesting, for they do not keep well, on the order of just a few days.

Leeks
Leeks are another cool season crop in the onion family which does not tolerate temperatures much above 80 degrees. Leeks are best started indoors as some varieties require a 5 to 6 month growing season. Whether transplanting leeks into the garden or directly sowing them, you’ll want to have a 1-2 inch trench to plant them into. As the leeks grow gradually fill in the trench with soil. Leeks will tolerate heavy frosts but not hard freezes, so make sure to harvest the leeks before temperatures drop below 24 degrees. Leeks store quite well for several months in crisper bins.

Lettuce
Lettuce is a cool season crop that comes in many varieties of colour, taste and texture. Lettuce should be directly sowed into the garden a week or two before the last frost. Most lettuce varieties will tolerate temperatures down to 28 degrees but not much lower. Full sun and well drained soil are essential for earlier plantings while later plantings towards late spring and summer should be of a heat-tolerant variety and will prefer a couple of hours of shade during the hottest time of the day. Sow seeds 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep and cover with fine soil about 2 inches apart. After seedlings emerge thin to around 6 inches apart for leaf lettuce and a foot or more apart for head lettuce. Lettuce requires an inch or more of rainfall per week and an evenly moist soil. When harvesting lettuce you’ll want to do so early in the morning while the leaves have their highest moisture content.

Onions
Onions are a bulb that require slightly acidic soil high in organic material. Onions can be planted by seed or purchased at your local nursery as small bulbs. Onions can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked and depending on the variety will take from 100 to 160 days to mature for harvest. If planting bulbs set them roughly 4 inches apart. If sowing by seed an inch apart will do. After seedlings emerge thin to the required 4 inch spacing. Onions do not like crowding so be sure to keep their immediate vicinity free of weeds. Since onions have a long growing season a future blog will provide information on maintenance and harvesting.

Peas
Peas should be sowed into your garden as soon as the soil can be worked as they can tolerate rather chilly temperatures down to 22 degrees. Soak pea seeds in water overnight before planting as this will aid in germination. Peas require as much sun as possible as shade will reduce their sugar content and make them mealy/starchy. Peas will grow even in poor soil and will not require much fertilizer, but growing them in fertile soil does enhance their flavour. Peas are also shallow rooted so they will require regular watering, but not in excess. Peas are ready for harvest after the pods become plump. Daily harvesting will prolong crop production and keep peas from becoming hard/starchy. Peas will lose flavour quickly after harvesting, so blanching your harvest may be necessary. This blanching process will also be discussed in a future blog. Peas can also be stored by drying.

Potatoes
Potatoes are a tuber, or stem plant high in starch and a staple food crop. Potatoes grow best in sandy soil high in organic material which is well-drained. Seed potatoes can be purchased from your local nursery or whole potatoes which have grown eyes can be cut and planted. If you plan on using cut potatoes you’ll want to leave them out for a couple of days to dry out and heal, otherwise they will be susceptible to rotting. Potatoes can be planted a couple to several weeks before the last frost depending on the variety. Make sure you loosen the soil rather deep and remove as many rocks as possible as these tubers will need room to grow. When planting dig a trench and place potato seeds or cuttings in the trench and fill with soil right to the top of the tubers. As the shoots emerge and begin to grow you may also want to add organic compost around the plants as this will help to keep these plants well fed and help to support them upright.

Radish
Radish is a fast growing cool season crop ideal for adding to salads and in certain cooking dishes. Being a root crop, radish prefers loose well-drained soil free of rocks or other debris. Radishes can also be companion planted with many other crops for they deter certain pests, will not compete for space and will often be harvested before the other crops will need it. Radishes can be sowed directly into the garden at a depth of a 1/4 to 1/2 an inch 3 inches apart. Seedlings will emerge in 5-8 days depending on soil and weather conditions. For a continuing harvest radishes can be planted every 2 weeks through September. Radishes are usually ready for harvest between 25-35 days and should not be left in the ground too long for they will become woody and split.

Spinach
A cool season crop and one of the first crops to be planted in the spring, spinach is highly nutritious and contains a wide range of vitamins and minerals. The soil should be loosened to a depth of around a foot and high in organic material. The spot you choose should receive full sun, although if planted later in the season may require a few hours of afternoon shade and should also be a heat-tolerant/drought-resistant variety. Sow seeds 1/2 inch deep and 2 inches apart and cover with fine soil. Once seedlings emerge thin to 8 inches apart and add a top dressing of compost. Spinach should be kept moist and well cultivated. Harvest individual leaves as soon as they’re big enough to eat. However, smaller leaves can be harvested early for spinach salad or mesclun mix.

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Espoma Natural Gardening Solutions

Environmentally Responsible Gardening Products - Garden's Alive


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Soil moisture 0-200cm
Soil moisture 0-200cm

Soil temperature 0-10cm
Soil temperature 0-10cm

Soil temperature 10-40cm
Soil temperature 10-40cm


Kelvin temperature scale
273.15°K = 0°C




Current watches, warnings and advisories.


Eastern US current watches/warnings

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Regional Forecast

Synopsis - Issued 4/16 4:30am

A deep layer ridge will effect the sensible weather over the Northeast over the next three days bringing mostly clear skies and temperatures warming to above normal levels for mid April while a vertically stacked low pressure will spin over the open waters of the Western Atlantic. This ridge will begin to break down over the weekend as a backdoor cold frontal boundary dips into New England and low pressure approaches from the west. Precipitation may sneak back into the Northeast by Saturday night and Sunday, lingering into early next week. Heights build again by midweek with temperatures region-wide returning to above normal readings.


Short-term - Issued 4/16 4:30am

A rather chilly start to the day on Wednesday as temperatures across much of the region will begin their climb from below freezing. Frost advisories and freeze warnings are issued for areas of southeastern Pennsylvania and central/southern New Jersey where the growing season begins on 'April 15th'. Despite the chilly start temperatures will recover quite nicely with highs climbing to above normal readings on bright sunshine and warming temperatures aloft. The only fly in the ointment will be along immediate coastal areas where onshore flow and mid/high level cloudiness may skirt these areas from the offshore low pressure system. Temperatures will rise into the 60's throughout much of the region except for the higher terrain of northern New York and New England where highs will likely remain in the 50's. Immediate coastal areas of Downeast Maine, Cape Cod, the Twin Forks of Long Island may also remain in the 50's given an onshore flow and possible cloud cover. Status quo for Thursday and Friday as stationary deep layer ridge remains intact over the region. Skies will remain mostly clear with temperatures moderating each day by 3-5 degrees for both daily min's and max's. A backdoor front may sneak down into extreme northern Maine shaving a few degree off the temperatures here, however, for the remainder of the Northeast this front will have little consequence in the shore-term. Low pressure system offshore and its associated cloudiness will pull away with surface high slowly shifting off the coast. The end result will cause the onshore flow to relax along the immediate coast with temperatures close to inland readings as flow turns offshore.

Mid-term - Issued 4/16 4:30am

Squeeze play will be on for the Northeast over the weekend as a backdoor frontal boundary continues to drop down into the region aided by a push by Canadian high pressure nosing southward into northern New England. Also in the mix will be an approaching shortwave via the Midwest on Sunday which will be deflected northwest of the region by the retreating, but still strong, deep layer ridge along the East Coast. Temperatures will noticeably cool over the northern half of the region on Saturday following the passage of this cold front. In addition to the cooler temperatures across the northern half of the region will be an increase in cloudiness and the possibility of some light showers and/or drizzle. The southern half of the region may see an increase in high cloudiness but that will do little to knock down the warm temperatures which are expected to be 10 degrees or more above normal. By Sunday the Midwestern low pressure will move through the central Great Lakes into Ontario and drag a trough into the region increasing the chances for precipitation. Only widely scattered light showers are expected, however. Clouds and showers will linger over the eastern half of the region on Monday with slowly improving conditions from the west.

Long-term - Issued 4/16 4:30am

Broad southwesterly flow in the lower layers of the atmosphere will develop behind the departing trough on Tuesday as temperatures will begin a moderating trend once again. This southwesterly flow will not only raise temperatures but bring about an increase in humidity as well. The developing deep layer ridge will rest firmly over the Northeast by midweek bringing perhaps the warmest day thus far this spring. With the increase in humidity there may be a few afternoon showers and thundershowers, which will become more concentrated as a deep trough approaches from the west by Thursday in a high meridional flow over the contiguous US.

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Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

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Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover



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Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

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Great Lakes SST's 4/03/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 04/03/2008.

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Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

4/4: Lake is beginning to thaw from the shores inward
4/6: Lake is now completely unfrozen.

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April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")
April 4th - 41°F/31°F....0.67"...0%....1.8"...(2")
April 5th - 46°F/37°F....0.08"...30%...0.0"...(>1")
April 6th - 46°F/36°F....0.00"...20%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 7th - 49°F/34°F....0.01"...30%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 8th - 59°F/29°F....0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 9th - 61°F/31°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 10th - 64°F/43°F...0.00"...100%..0.0"...(0")
April 11th - 55°F/43°F...0.32"...5%....0.0"...(0")
April 12th - 70°F/42°F...0.44"...70%...0.0"...(0")
April 13th - 46°F/32°F...0.00"...30%...0.0"...(0")
April 14th - 49°F/27°F...0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 15th - 55°F/26°F...0.00"...95%...0.0"...(0")
April 16th - 65°F/25°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")
April 17th - 75°F/31°F...0.00"..100%...0.0"...(0")


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Updated: 3:32 PM GMT on April 19, 2008

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100th Blog - evolution and changes

By: sullivanweather, 9:04 PM GMT on April 08, 2008

I've been a member of Weather Underground for over a year now (despite finding the site over 12 years ago) and have been posting blogs since June of 2007. Many of my blogs have been in the format of weekly forecasts for the Northeast region, which are very important during the Winter season which is when our high impact weather events are most likely to occur. Now that Spring has arrived (although the folks in northern Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine would beg to differ) there will be some format changes to the blog. This will also be my 100th blog here and in being so I will provide links to a few of the more in-depth blogs I have worked on.

Some of the format changes will include gardening weather (now) and as tropical season ramps up, the tropics. The tropics will be interesting this year and especially for us living along the East Coast. As discussed in my 2008 Atlantic Basin tropical forecast, several years in the past with similar conditions as this year have brought the threat for East Coast tropical systems. I’m sure this year will be no exception and I will likely have an update on my hurricane forecast before the season starts. What will be ramped down will be the depth and detail of the regional forecasts unless severe weather or heat waves threaten. Forecasts will be more general to give me more time for gardening and tropical aspects of weather.




Top 20 Northeast weather events of the previous 25 years


Fall foliage


1st snowfall of the 2007-08 winter season


A forecast for the 2008 Atlantic Hurricane season


September in review


October in review


November in review


December in review


January in review


February in review


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Gardening is something we could all do whether or not we have land, a front porch or back deck. There’s many benefits for one to grow their own food, including savings on grocery bills, eating healthier, and reducing ones’ impact on the environment. It takes many pesticides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers, the burning of fossil fuels/subsequent release of greenhouse gasses and the clearing of forest in order for large commercial operations to bring food from the farm to the grocery store and finally to ones’ dinner table. A well organized garden could provide vegetables for ones’ family for 4-10 months out of the year (Northeast region), depending on ones’ taste and diet. That being said, a section of this blog will now be dedicated to gardening and will provide some background to when one should have certain tasks completed by and some methods for doing so.


For Northeast locations where the snow has melted now is a good time to begin your garden preparations. If one doesn't have a garden and is thinking about installing one, this is the time you should choose the location for your garden. It is essential that a spot be chosen that receives at a minimum, 8 hours of direct sunlight. The more sun the better. Be mindful of any trees that have yet to leaf out. In choosing the spot for the garden you want to have a plan of what vegetables you'd like to grow. Certain plants require lots of space while others not so much. It is wise to plan for this aspect of your garden early. If you're a first time gardener you'll be very surprised at how large and spread out certain crops get by August and you'll want to leave yourself space for harvesting.

Once a spot is chosen, you want to begin turning the dirt, removing as many stones as possible. For us here in the Northeast this is the most back breaking aspect of gardening for our soil is very rocky due to the area being near the extent of the vast glaciers that once covered the area at the peak of the ice ages. You want to have a bucket handy to put any rocks and stones into. You can either get rid of these stones by dumping them in a location of your choosing or save them for garden pathways. In my garden I chose the latter. There's many techniques to turning the soil. If time is short and you're not looking for a good workout, having or renting a rototiller is the easiest way to get the job done. For those of us that like to get dirty there's various other methods of turning the soil. The one I recommend is using a pick axe with a broad side opposite the pick. Other methods include using a durable pitch-fork, or a plain ol' shovel. Start at a corner of the garden plot working down about 10-14 inches. After you have yourself a hole you'll find it easier to chip dirt off the sides of the hole rather than going down from the surface. While working on this process it is essential to take frequent breaks and drink lots of water if your method of turning the soil is manual labor.

Once this step is complete it is time to rake the area flat. You'll encounter many stones during this process so have your bucket handy. You'll want to rake through the soil several times, removing as many stones as possible, especially if you plan on planted root crops such as carrots or parsnips. In my garden my beds are raised and I highly recommend this method for vegetable garden beds. It has various advantages over more traditional garden beds that are at level with their surroundings For one, it makes for faster drainage of rainwater which helps to prevent fungus and rotting of your crops. Secondly, it helps make your garden aesthetically pleasing to the eye and gives you a place to put all those stones you’ll encounter.

To raise your garden beds you’ll want to have a border that’ll be able to hold back your soil. Bricks, fieldstone placed up on end, non-treated wood, logs from a fallen tree are all very good at getting the job done. You’ll want to outline your garden beds with these materials while placing the stones you have dug out of the garden in the paths along the outside. The stones will help with drainage and help to brace the outside of your border. Be mindful that this step is going to take several days to a week to complete, especially if your time is short. If you feel as though things are going slow don’t be discouraged. The work you have to put into preparation is tedious but well worth the effort.

By now you should have your garden plotted, soil turned, borders set and paths installed. This next step is very important, especially if you live in an area where deer roam (and who doesn’t). You’ll want to install some type of fencing to keep them out of your garden being mindful of other various small animals that may enter your garden as well. The first step will be selecting proper fence posts. You’ll want to get fence posts that are at least 6 feet tall but preferably 8 feet tall and a correspondingly tall fence (as well as chicken wire fencing *optional). Sink the fence posts at least 18 to 24 inches into the ground to make sure they’re sturdy. After putting the fence posts into the ground dig a 6 inch trench between the fence posts then attach the fencing to the posts. Once the fencing is attached to the posts it is time to attach sections of chicken wire fencing to the primary fencing at the ground level. Cut a section of chicken wire to the length of the trenches you have dug between the fence posts. Lay the chicken wire into the base of the of the trenches and lean up the side of the primary fencing. Fill in your trenches with the dirt you removed and twist the cut ends of the chicken wire to the primary fencing. The reason for attaching the chicken wire fencing and burying it into the ground is to keep out smaller garden pests such as rabbits.

You’re now almost complete in your garden preparation. The garden is plotted out, borders are in, fencing is up and now it is time to amend your soil and raise your beds. If you’re putting in a garden for the first time it is very likely that your soil is not of great quality, especially if where you decided to put your garden used to be a lawn. You’re going to want to add plenty of organic material to your beds to increase the fertility of the soil. The easiest way to do this is to buy bags of high organic top soil. However, with a little intuition, one can find plenty of organic material lying around ones’ property. Many of us have places where we put yard waste, such as grass clippings, leaf piles etc. Wooded areas also can be a prime area to find high organic material to amend the soil with. Raking the top layer of leaves from a wooded area will reveal several inches of highly organic topsoil. Whichever method you use of getting this soil, upon having it you’ll want to incorporate this material into the top 6 to 8 inches of soil in your garden. Make sure you incorporate enough soil into your garden beds to sufficiently raise them above the level of the surroundings. In addition to adding soil to your garden beds you’ll also want to add an all-purpose organic fertilizer and work this into the top 4 to 6 inches of soil.

Depending on how much time you have on your hands to complete these steps you’ll have yourself a garden ready for planting. The next blog in this garden series will be frost-hardy plants that you can start to put into the ground early in the season.



Soil moisture 0-200cm
Soil moisture 0-200cm

Soil temperature 0-10cm
Soil temperature 0-10cm

Soil temperature 10-40cm
Soil temperature 10-40cm


Kelvin temperature scale
273.15°K = 0°C




Current watches, warnings and advisories.


Eastern US current watches/warnings

------

Regional Forecast


Synopsis - Isssued 4/7 5:00pm

Fair weather will persist over much of the Northeast for the remainder of this Tuesday afternoon and evening. Low pressure will move into the Great Lakes region later tonight which will weaken as it heads north of the region, dragging a trough through the Northeast on Wednesday providing the region with some clouds and showers. Aside from northern New England there will not be much change in airmass behind this trough, leading to a rather mild Thursday for the southern half of the region. A deep low pressure will develop over the Midwest on Friday and slowly push its way towards the Northeast for the weekend bringing a pronounced change in the overall pattern for the region. Much cooler and wetter weather will accompany this low pressure with the chance for significant snows once again across northern Maine. High meridional flow over the contiguous United States continues into early next week with the East Coast finding itself in the axis of a deep trough keeping chilly and unsettled weather over the region.


Short-term - Issued 4/9 12:00pm

Low pressure moving into Canada will push a weakening trough through the Northeast this afternoon bringing a narrow line of showers with it. These showers will be decreasing in coverage and intensity as they run headlong into a deep layer ridge set up along the East Coast and Western Atlantic Ocean from Florida to Nova Scotia. Coastal areas should see fair skies this afternoon with a slight increase in high cloudiness. Just inland of the coast cloudiness will be a bit more pronounced but most of the precipitation will be held off by the ridge of high pressure. It's once one gets into the interior that the chance for showers will materialize with northern and western sections seeing the highest pops. Temperatures will be quite mild today across much of the region with coastal areas of New Jersey to southern New England as well as the southern half of the interior rising into the 60's. Further north and west where clouds and showers exist temperatures are likely to remain in the 50's. Winds will be out of the south to southwest at 5-15mph switching to westerly behind the trough.

The trough will continue to lose steam tonight as it continues to push eastwards across the remainder of the region. Showers will wane ahead of the front with only isolated activity expected that will drop less than a tenth of an inch of precipitation. Skies will be mostly cloudy as there will be times of both overcast and broken cloud cover. Temperatures will fall into the upper 30's to upper 40's across the interior from north to south with southern coastal areas likely remaining in the 50's. Winds will be light and southerly across eastern sections before midnight then switching to a westerly direction after the frontal passage while western sections sees winds go light and variable.

A cold frontal boundary will drop down into northern New England tomorrow with areas from the Champlain Valley to northern Maine likely seeing a raw day with low clouds and drizzle. The higher terrain of these regions will see snow showers as temperatures aloft will be sufficiently cold enough for frozen precipitation. Conditions will improve rapidly towards the south with partly sunny skies and much warmer temperatures south of the front. However, western sections will likely see clouds increase by late morning with showers developing by afternoon as warm advection isentropic lift generated precipitation develops. Temperatures will range from the upper 30's to lower 40's across northern New England with low to mid 30's over the higher terrain. South of the cold front temperatures rise rapidly into the 50's and 60's. A few locations of southern New Jersey and extreme southeastern Pennsylvania may even approach 70 degrees.


Mid-term - Issued 4/9 1:20pm

Strong low pressure will begin to wrap up over Upper Midwest Thursday night as a high pressure tries to build down from northern Quebec. Southerly flow ahead of the low to our west combined with the confluence between the northern and southern branches of the jet stream will strengthen the baroclinic zone over the Northeast. Isentropic lift generated precipitation will continue to spread over the western half of the region with most of New England remaining dry. A large temperature gradient will exist over the region with northern New England having lows in the 20's as southern Pennsylvania and New Jersey sees lows in the lower 50's. There will be little change in the evolution of this system during the day on Friday as moisture continues to stream south of the confluent flow over northern New England providing rain for much of Pennsylvania, the southern two-thirds of New York, New Jersey and southern New England. The trough begins to pulls eastwards on Friday night as a triple point low forms and moves from the Ohio Valley into the region. A warm and unstable airmass will be pulled northwards ahead of the frontal boundary which could provide enough instability for thunder across the southern two-thirds of Pennsylvania and the southern half of New Jersey. Otherwise expect rain to gradually spread northwards where it could begin to mix with snow/ice towards northern New England. Low pressure pulls offshore by late Saturday afternoon ending much of the steady precipitation over the region. Scattered showers will be left in its wake as the Northeast will find itself under a deep trough axis. Colder air filtering into the region behind the low could begin to mix rain with snow from north to south and especially across the higher terrain Saturday night. Temperatures will begin the period above normal across the southern half of the region but fall to near normal readings by Saturday night. Across the north temperatures will likely remain below normal throughout the period.


Long-term - Issued 4/10 2:45am

Clouds and chilly weather will dominate the long term period as a deep layer full latitude trough sets up shop over the East Coast. An area of low pressure will develop off the coast Sunday night into Monday which will need to be watched for it could provide at least the chance for some late-season snowfall. Boundary layer temperatures look questionable, but the possibility is certainly there. Of course, this late in the season elevation will play a crucial role in precipitation type, as well as distance from the coastline. Inverted trough development on the backside of this low pressure could help to enhance low level convergence over the region, so snow or rain, it will be very dreary, chilly and raw. Conditions may finally begin to improve my Wednesday but temperatures will remain below normal throughout the period.

___________________________________________________________

Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

___________________________________________________________


Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover


MODIS Rapid Response satellite photo of Northeast snow cover (12/06/2007)


___________________________________________________________

Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

---------------------------

Great Lakes SST's 4/03/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 04/03/2008.

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Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

4/4: Lake is beginning to thaw from the shores inward
4/6: Lake is now completely unfrozen.

___________________________________________________________



April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")
April 4th - 41°F/31°F....0.67"...0%....1.8"...(2")
April 5th - 46°F/37°F....0.08"...30%...0.0"...(>1")
April 6th - 46°F/36°F....0.00"...20%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 7th - 49°F/34°F....0.01"...30%...0.0"...(Trace)
April 8th - 59°F/29°F....0.00"...50%...0.0"...(0")
April 9th - 61°F/31°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(0")
April 10th - 64°F/43°F...0.00"...100%..0.0"...(0")
April 11th - 55°F/43°F...0.32"...5%....0.0"...(0")
April 12th - 70°F/42°F...0.44"...70%...0.0"...(0")


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Updated: 6:54 AM GMT on April 13, 2008

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Rain/snow tonight and Saturday;potential coastal low for southern sections Sunday

By: sullivanweather, 10:46 PM GMT on April 04, 2008

Current watches, warnings and advisories.


Eastern US current watches/warnings

------

Regional Forecast

Synopsis - Issued 4/4 6:45pm

Unsettled weather will continue to plague the coastal areas of the Northeast over the weekend as the western half of the region sees steadily improving conditions. A narrow ridge axis will exist over the Northeast on Monday as a trough advancing towards the region from the Great Lakes states will wash out upon encountering this ridge. A moderating trend will ensue Tuesday with another trough bringing showers to the Northeast on Wednesday. High pressure builds in on Thursday before an area of low pressure moves towards the region by Friday.


Near-term - Issued 4/4 6:45pm

Areas of low pressure currently reside over western Pennsylvania and just offshore Long Island with a warm front draped over western Pennsylvania and down the Appalachians out of the forecast region. Warm advection precipitation continues over northern New England with a second batch of stratiform precipitation associated with surface trough over upstate New York. Scattered showers also exist ahead of the cold frontal boundary with perhaps a rumble of thunder possible in a slightly unstable airmass over western Pennsylvania. Elsewhere it is rather dreary as low clouds, fog and drizzle will continue until dusk.

Short-term - Issued 4/4 7:40pm

Low pressure along a frontal boundary over western Pennsylvania will move eastwards through the commonwealth this evening and offshore after midnight. As this low traverses the region it will bring widely scattered showers over the southern half of the region with a few thundershowers possible over western Pennsylvania where a slightly unstable airmass is in place with temperatures in the low 60’s and dewpoints in the low 50’s. Further northwards a more stratiform precipitation event will be ongoing with light to moderate rainfall in the valleys with mixed precipitation or snowfall over the higher terrain. Elevations over 2,000’ in northern New York, Vermont and New Hampshire should receive several inches of snowfall as the evening progresses. Once one heads into northern Maine elevation will be less of a factor in precipitation type as snowfall should be present over all areas although the higher elevations will see much more snow accumulation than the lowlands. Further south the story will be light rain, drizzle and fog until he cold front sweeps offshore bringing the deeper moisture/best lift with it. Outside of where the warm, unstable airmass has made it into western Pennsylvania there will be little fall in temperatures during the overnight hours. Lows will range from the upper 20’s to low 30’s over the higher terrain of northern New York and New England. Elsewhere over the interior temperatures will range from the mid 30’s to the low 40’s as coastal areas remain solidly in the 40’s. Winds will shift from the southeast to northerly direction after the frontal passage likely remaining under 10mph.

The cold front will hang up over the southern coastal regions Saturday keeping rain over southern/central New Jersey, extreme southeastern Pennsylvania, Long Island and the immediate south coast of southern New England during the morning hours. Across northern New England scattered snow showers and flurries will be ending by mid morning as high pressure builds down from Ontario. The cold front will sag southwards slightly as the day progresses, however, rain showers will continue over southern New Jersey. To the east of the Appalachians a raw onshore flow will keep low clouds and dreary conditions socked in throughout the day with little rise in temperatures. Over western and northern sections some dry air will advect into these areas in the lower levels allowing for these clouds to break. Mid and high level clouds will still be present, though, so mostly cloudy will be the proper wording for these areas for much of the day with gradually decreasing cloud cover later in the afternoon. Highs will reach into the 40’s across much of the interior and coastal New England with 30’s over the higher terrain. Western areas that manage to lose a fair percentage of their cloud cover will climb into the low 50’s while coastal areas of New Jersey will likely see slowly falling temperatures during the afternoon as the cold frontal boundary passes and winds shift to an onshore flow off of cool mid 40’s SST’s.


By Saturday night another wave of low pressure will ride up the frontal boundary from the Southeast states. This low will move offshore the Carolinas after midnight spreading heavier precipitation back northwards into central New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania, Long Island and coastal southern New England. The extreme northern edge of the precipitation shield will have to be watched if it moves into the higher elevations of northern New Jersey, the Poconos and southern Catskills where temperatures aloft may support light snowfall. It is doubtful any of this snow will accumulate, but it could whiten grassy areas and colder surfaces. Towards the north and west it will remain precipitation-free with varying levels of mid and high level cloudiness which will decrease in coverage further away from the coast one heads. Temperatures will range from the upper 30’s to low 40’s along the coastal areas with 20’s and 30’s over the interior, coldest across the higher terrain of northern New England.

Low pressure moves east-northeastwards away from the Northeastern coastal areas during the day on Sunday. Rain will gradually decrease in intensity during the morning hours and all but end by early afternoon. However, an onshore flow will continue for much of the day, keeping low clouds and drizzle over areas east of the Appalachians. The tricky part of the forecast will be trying to determine how far west the marine layer moves, which right now looks to be a State College-Elmira-Syracuse line. West of here skies will be partly cloudy to mostly sunny with temperatures rising into the 50’s. Towards the east temperatures will likely remain in the 40’s with upper 30’s likely across the higher terrain of northern New England. Winds will be easterly at 5-10mph carrying that pesky marine layer inland.

___________________________________________________________

Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

___________________________________________________________


Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover


MODIS Rapid Response satellite photo of Northeast snow cover (12/06/2007)


___________________________________________________________

Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

---------------------------

Great Lakes SST's 4/03/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 04/03/2008.

-------

Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

___________________________________________________________



April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")
April 4th - 41°F/31°F....0.67"...0%....1.8"...(2")
April 5th - 46°F/37°F....0.08"...30%...0.0"...(>1")
April 6th - 46°F/36°F....0.00"...20%...0.0"...(Trace)


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Updated: 5:50 PM GMT on April 08, 2008

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Sun today;Stormy Friday and Saturday

By: sullivanweather, 11:19 AM GMT on April 01, 2008

Current watches, warnings and advisories.


Eastern US current watches/warnings

------

Regional Forecast


Synopsis - Issued 4/1 @7:20am

A strong cold front will push through the Northeast Tuesday bringing showers and thunderstorms as well as strong winds in it's wake. High pressure will build in for Wednesday and Thursday before another area of low pressure moves into the region late Thursday night into Friday and Saturday. Pleasant conditions will close out the weekend.


Near-term - Issued 4/1 @7:20am

It will be a rather active weather day this Tuesday as low pressure moves north of the region through southern Ontario pushing a warm front northward this morning then dragging a strong cold front through the Northeast later this afternoon. Widely scattered showers are present this morning throughout the region with areas of low clouds, fog and drizzle. The surface warm front has pushed its way northward to the Adirondacks of New York and bisects New England from northwest to southeast. South of this front temperatures are rapidly warmed overnight into the 40's and 50's while to the north of this front temperatures remain in the 30's. Pockets of light snow and wintry mix still exist this morning over northern Maine but any precipitation here should quickly change over to rain with continued warm air advection.


Short-term - Issued 4/1 @7:20am

A pre-frontal trough exists ahead of the main cold front which will begin to impinge on western sections of the Northeast by mid-morning with a concentration of rain showers along it. This pre-frontal trough will run several hours ahead of the main frontal boundary and could help to limit surface based instability due to cloud cover. However, strong winds aloft will be present over the region this afternoon with a 50-60kt low level jet @850mb and 60-70kt winds @700mb. As the cold front punches into the region later today, lapse rates will increase and could still force a line of low-topped convection which may tap into these stronger winds aloft and transfer them to the surface. Aside from the convection there are other concerns today as the very mild and moist air will make for rapid snow melt over areas that have built significant snowpacks over this very wet winter and early spring making flooding a concern. Areas of the Adirondacks, Berkshires and southern Green and White mountains will be most susceptible especially if any convection does fire up which could produce a lot of rain in a short period of time. Another concern will be areas of northern New Hampshire and northern Maine where a tremendous amount of snowcover exists and when combined with the expected rainfall could lead to roof collapse. Rainfall amounts do not seem to be too impressive but any localized heavier showers may cause problems. High temperatures today will be very mild with 40’s and 50’s expected across much of the North Country. Across the remainder of the interior temperatures should have little trouble reaching into the upper 50’s to mid 60’s, especially given that Buffalo already is reporting 62°F early this morning. Along the coastal plain temperature will range from the mid to upper 60’s across southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and extreme southeastern New York with 50’s along the south coast of New England and Long Island due to onshore flow off water temperatures will at their climatological lows in the upper 30’s and low 40’s. On a personal note, today should be the first day since 11/22/07 that temperatures will climb above 60°F here in Bethel, NY.


Low pressure will be strengthening to around ~985mb this evening as it moves into Quebec. With high pressure building in from the west the pressure gradient will tighten over the Northeast with strong cold air advection making for good momentum transfer leading to strong gusty winds. Around the lakes winds will be out of the west at 20-30 mph with gusts to 45mph, however, the higher terrain of the Adirondacks, Green and White mountains could see 30-40mph winds with gusts over 50mph. Further south winds will not be as strong but it will still be blustery. Any scattered rain showers will changeover to snow showers with upslope areas seeing a light accumulation of up to an inch. Temperatures aloft will be marginal for the lakes to become involved as well with a coating possible downwind of Lake Ontario. These lake enhanced show showers will be short lived as inversions lower rapidly after midnight. Elsewhere expect gradually clearing skies. Temperatures will fall into the 20’s and low 30’s across the interior with mid 30’s to low 40’s expected along coastal areas.

High pressure continues to build into the Northeast from the Ohio Valley Wednesday. Skies will continue their clearing trend, especially over the southern and western half of the region. Further northeast into northern New York and New England upslope flow will continue to produce clouds over the higher terrain with a few snow showers possible, especially over northern Maine. Despite the sunshine, temperatures will only climb around 10 degrees from their morning lows and winds will continue to remain blustery. High’s will remain below freezing over the higher terrain of the North Country with upper 30’s to mid 40’s over the remainder of the interior from north to south. Areas along the coastal plain should rise to the upper 40’s to near 50°F. Winds will be out of the west-northwest from 10-20mph with gusts to 30mph, especially over New England. Later in the afternoon wind will begin to diminish over western sections.


Mid-term - Issued 4/2 8:30am

High pressure will settle over New York and Pennsylvania tonight, leading to clear skies and light winds over these areas, ideal for radiational cooling. Further northeast over northern New England skies will be mostly clear, although some clouds and snow showers may still plague the higher terrain of northern Maine. Northwesterly winds will still be a factor here so these areas won't radiate as well. Temperatures will range from the teens and 20's across the interior to the low 30's along the coastal plain.


The aforementioned high pressure will begin to slide off the coast Thursday morning but will still remain close enough to the region to give most areas a rather pleasant day. Skies will be mostly sunny throughout much of the Northeast during the morning hours. By afternoon high clouds will begin to stream into areas of western/southern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey as the next system begins to approach from the Mid-Mississippi Valley. These clouds will lower and thicken towards evening and a few showers may break out over southwestern Pennsylvania before sundown. Temperatures will continue to average several degree below normal for early April.

Moisture will continue to stream northeastwards into the region Thursday night with precipitation breaking out from southwest to northeast. Once this precipitation makes it into central New York, northeastern Pennsylvania and interior New England temperatures may be cold enough to support and mixture of freezing rain and sleet. Northern New York and northern New England should escape the precipitation Thursday night but will see increasing levels of cloud cover as the night progresses. Temperatures will average a few degrees below normal north and a few degrees above normal south.


Low pressure will move through the Northeast on Friday with precipitation eventually overspreading the entire region. Across far northern Maine precipitation will be snow once again where they will add on to their record breaking snow season. To the immediate south, precipitation may start as snow across northern Vermont, New Hampshire and central Maine but change over to a wintry mix and eventually rain by afternoon while further south it will be all rain. Temperatures will be near normal across the southern half of the region and below normal across the north where wintry precipitation types are expected. By evening the area of low pressure will be moving offshore, dragging a cold front through the Northeast. Some scattered convection may clip extreme southeastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey as these areas may sneak into the warm sector. Otherwise it will be a rather uneventful cold frontal passage. Clouds will be slow to clear out of the region behind the front and temperatures will be slow to fall behind the frontal boundary as the airmass behind the front is not terribly cold.


___________________________________________________________

Radar: Northeast Region Loop

NE radar

___________________________________________________________


Current Northeast Snowcover

Northeast Snowcover


MODIS Rapid Response satellite photo of Northeast snow cover (12/06/2007)


___________________________________________________________

Local SST's

Northeast SST's


Current SST's off the Northeast Coast.

---------------------------

Great Lakes SST's 3/11/2008

Great Lakes SST's as of 03/11/2008.

-------

Fillipini's Pond conditions (Lake across street)

11/6: 42°F
11/9: 37°F
11/11: 33°F - 1st morning with grease ice on lake.
11/17: 33°F
11/22: 34°F
11/24: 32°F - patchy ice on lake this morning
11/25: 32°F - lake iced over completely, melting along the shores during the afternoon.
12/1: Patchy ice has been on the lake all week. Lake should freeeze over completely tonight.
12/3: Lake is frozen over and covered with snow.

___________________________________________________________


March Daily Weather Statistics


March 1st - 34°F/19°F....0.21"....20%..2.9"...(17")
March 2nd - 35°F/18°F....Trace....80%..0.1"...(16")
March 3rd - 53°F/17°F....0.03"....30%..0.0"...(15")
March 4th - 41°F/32°F....0.86"....0%...Trace..(9")
March 5th - 45°F/28°F....1.03"....5%...0.0"...(6")
March 6th - 45°F/21°F....0.00"....70%..0.0"...(5")
March 7th - 43°F/23°F....0.74"....30%..0.0"...(5")
March 8th - 41°F/28°F....1.33"....5%...0.1"...(4")
March 9th - 31°F/19°F....0.03"....40%..0.2"...(3")
March 10th - 34°F/16°F....0.00"....50%..0.0"...(3")
March 11th - 39°F/21°F....0.03"....80%..0.5"...(3")
March 12th - 36°F/26°F....0.01"....20%..0.1"...(3")
March 13th - 43°F/21°F....Trace....50%..Trace..(3")
March 14th - 47°F/27°F....0.19"....10%..0.0"...(3")
March 15th - 45°F/35°F....0.24"....40%..Trace..(2")
March 16th - 39°F/27°F....0.11"....20%..0.6"...(2")
March 17th - 44°F/21°F....0.00"...100%..0.0"...(2")
March 18th - 38°F/25°F....0.06"...20%...0.1"...(2")
March 19th - 43°F/32°F....1.21"....0%...Trace..(2")
March 20th - 45°F/27°F....0.06"...20%...0.3"...(1")
March 21st - 35°F/23°F....0.03"...40%...0.5"...(1")
March 22nd - 40°F/20°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(1")
March 23rd - 37°F/18°F....0.00"...60%...0.0"...(1")
March 24th - 41°F/18°F....0.00"...60%...0.0"...(1")
March 25th - 43°F/18°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(1")
March 26th - 49°F/31°F....0.14"...60%...1.1"...(2")
March 27th - 44°F/27°F....0.00"...0%....0.0"...(1")
March 28th - 37°F/28°F....0.43"...10%...Trace..(1")
March 29th - 36°F/20°F....0.00"...95%...0.0"...(1")
March 30th - 43°F/13°F....0.00"...90%...0.0"...(1")
March 31st - 42°F/29°F....0.38"...0%....0.3"...(1")



April Daily Weather Statistics


April 1st - 64°F/41°F....0.46"...25%...0.0"...(>1")
April 2nd - 41°F/27°F....0.01"...90%...0.1"...(>1")
April 3rd - 48°F/16°F....0.00"...80%...0.0"...(>1")


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Updated: 1:18 PM GMT on April 04, 2008

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About sullivanweather

Thomas is an avid weather enthusiast, landscaper and organic gardener. This blog is dedicated to Northeast and tropical weather forecasting. Enjoy!

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Barryville, NY
Elevation: 1012 ft
Temperature: 15.1 °F
Dew Point: 11.4 °F
Humidity: 85%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 4.0 mph
Updated: 11:55 PM EST on February 17, 2014
Town of Lumberland
Glen Spey, NY
Elevation: 1326 ft
Temperature: 58.2 °F
Dew Point: 55.9 °F
Humidity: 92%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 0.0 mph
Updated: 6:01 AM EDT on June 09, 2014

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