Rain Event Set For Eastern Seaboard Of U.S.

By: Shaun Tanner , 10:07 PM GMT on April 19, 2012

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With the Southeast in a deep drought, it might be good news that a strong storm is set to impact the area Saturday through Monday. This storm will initially dive through the Southern Plains where it could produce a few severe thunderstorms. No large tornadoes are expected, but a few weak spin ups cannot be ruled out along the Texas coast. The Storm Prediction Center has issued a slight chance of severe weather in the area, with a general chance of thunderstorms from eastern Texas through much of the eastern third of the country.



The main event for the country will take place over the weekend as a strong storm will move through the Gulf of Mexico where it will pick up a tremendous amount of moisture. This moisture will translate to a lot of rain for Florida. The center of the storm is expected to move over the state Sunday. The most recent model predictions are suggesting that the storm will remain just off the East Coast as it moves northeastward Sunday and Monday. If this track validates, most of the heavy rain will fall off the coast. But if it takes even a slight jog to the west, expect ample rain from Georgia through the Northeast. Even if the storm remains off the coast, however, heavy rain is anticipated mostly in coastal areas along the eastern seaboard. Below is the HPC precipitation forecast from Friday through Sunday afternoon. You will note the heaviest rain will target Florida and the Southeast Coast through North Carolina as up to 3 inches of rain is possible. A couple of inches of rain is also expected for parts of the Northeast.



It is important to note that if this type of storm had developed in January, it would be an extremely strong nor'easter that would impact the entire eastern seaboard with extreme Winter weather.

Cool air will filter into the Upper Midwest and Northeast behind this storm. Expect maximum temperatures in the 40s and 50s by Monday in the northeast. Averages for this time of year are in the 60s.

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About shauntanner

Shaun Tanner has been a meteorologist at Weather Underground since 2004.