Saturday's Question of the Day

By: ricderr , 4:14 PM GMT on January 25, 2014

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I remember back to my younger years of the early 70's and it seemed like everywhere you went people were smoking pot. I can remember halftime at the Warriors games the walkway to the second floor mezzanine would be jam packed with people all standing around smoking pot. To me at that time it seemed even though illegal it was commonplace. Then as the '70's came to a close the big trend was cocaine. We heard stories of the rich and famous having parties where the punch bowl was filled with the stuff. Clubs were packed with professionals and those trying to look professional and a trip to the bathroom would find a group of people huddled together, sniffing together as they got high before heading back to the bar and dance floor.

Then that changed and so did the climate as the "War on Drugs" kicked in. All of a sudden those same pot heads and snow sniffers became health conscious and people needed natural foods and exercise and we could not pollute the holy temple we called our bodies. Children were taught at school that anything and everything, including alcohol was a drug and must be avoided at all costs. I can remember when my oldest were elementary school age, complaining that their parents were druggies because the had an occasional beer. I especially remember Cassie one evening at a restaurant blurt to the whole dining area, "dad, alcohol is a drug." I wanted to crawl under the table from the disapproving looks received from other diners. I'm still not sure if their frownful gaze was due to my loud child or my one drink.

Fast forward to here and now where not only are their states that have legalized marijuana for medical use but now also have some gave permission for the leisure use of cannabis. I'm no longer a teen or young adult, but have aged into what my children call my older years. Even so I am still a dad to teenage and younger children and feel as the use of marijuana grows I am faced with a challenging decision. What do I tell my children when they ask me how I would react if they used pot? It's been 32 years since I last toked on a reefer and even though I joke with friends Colorado will be my new vacation destination, I have no desire to partake any longer. Also, I have been conditioned throughout the last 30 years to feel marijuana is a harmful drug even though I never bought into the argument that it was a "gateway" drug. Do I tell my children, ah it's no big deal, heck at your age I planted seeds in the history teachers planters at school and they were about twelve inches tall before he even knew what they were. Or do I explain if they ever thought they were going to drive, just let me smell pot on their clothes and the only driving they will be doing in pretending as they ride the bus. Or do I just resign myself to my rocking chair and lament that the world is passing me by as I become set in my ways during my older years? Who knows, but it leads to the QOD:

What is your opinion about the legalization of marijuana?

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58. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
4:33 PM GMT on February 05, 2014
ricderr has created a new entry.
57. Astrometeor
12:45 AM GMT on February 02, 2014
Quoting 56. TheDevilsAdvocate:
So, given that you're a strict Constitutionalist, I'm wondering where in Article I the magnitude of commerce between states comes into play. Seems that if you're going for a strict interpretation, either commerce exists or it doesn't.

You say a large company trading across state lines would trigger the Commerce Clause; how about a medium-sized company. How about a mom and pop operation exporting THC laden lollipops?




Commerce exists, I'm not going to deny that. However, the Constitution was created such that the federal government was just powerful enough to maintain the basic functions of government, i.e. to protect life, liberty, and happiness. I know I'm dodging your question(s), but I would rather not debate where the line should be drawn on marijuana.

To me, because drugs aren't mentioned in the Constitution, the 10th Amendment takes precedence, and leaves the matter up to the states/people. Of course, you can argue that the clause hardly mentions anything, but the Constitution wasn't meant to be stretched to cover everything imaginable for the federal government to regulate.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
56. TheDevilsAdvocate
12:37 AM GMT on February 02, 2014
Quoting 55. Astrometeor:


Hypothetical. When a case presents itself before the US Supreme Court, they run through hypotheticals in order to figure out where to draw the line of legal/illegal. In Colorado's case, people are directly traveling over to Colorado and buying marijuana, and then traveling back across state lines. That's different, from say a large company growing and then shipping across state lines.
So, given that you're a strict Constitutionalist, I'm wondering where in Article I the magnitude of commerce between states is defined. Seems that if you're going for a strict interpretation, either commerce exists or it doesn't.

You say a large company trading across state lines would trigger the Commerce Clause; how about a medium-sized company. How about a mom and pop operation exporting THC laden lollipops?


Member Since: April 12, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 297
55. Astrometeor
11:50 PM GMT on February 01, 2014
Quoting 54. oregonbirdofprey:
"But, you still can't punish small-scale behaviors. Large-scale yes, small-scale no."

What does this statement refer to? Not sure how it relates.


Hypothetical. When a case presents itself before the US Supreme Court, they run through hypotheticals in order to figure out where to draw the line of legal/illegal. In Colorado's case, people are directly traveling over to Colorado and buying marijuana, and then traveling back across state lines. That's different, from say a large company growing and then shipping across state lines.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
54. oregonbirdofprey
11:40 PM GMT on February 01, 2014
"But, you still can't punish small-scale behaviors. Large-scale yes, small-scale no."

What does this statement refer to? Not sure how it relates.
Member Since: September 26, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 955
53. Astrometeor
10:06 PM GMT on February 01, 2014
Quoting 52. TheDevilsAdvocate:
As soon as the marijuana leaves the state's borders, you have interstate commerce. Sales to non-residents are legal in Colorado; you really think that folks in neighboring states aren't going to be nipping across the border to pick up a quarter ounce for use at home?



No, of course not. I've heard of people from other countries flying to Colorado. TN has a ban on imports of wine. Does that stop (most) people? No. But, you still can't punish small-scale behaviors. Large-scale yes, small-scale no.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
52. TheDevilsAdvocate
5:22 PM GMT on February 01, 2014
Quoting 50. Astrometeor:


Scalia's concurrence:

Congress may regulate noneconomic intrastate activities only where the failure to do so “could … undercut” its regulation of interstate commerce.


That's interesting, but I disagree with the Court (and with Justice Scalia), on the grounds that because this is intrastate commerce, the necessary and proper clause nor the supremacy clause apply. As soon as the marijuana leaves the state borders, then it's illegal, but not within the state.

My AP Gov teacher (former lawyer) gave us her input on marijuana (and some other high profile laws). I guess you could consider her (and myself) strict Constitutionalists.
As soon as the marijuana leaves the state's borders, you have interstate commerce. Sales to non-residents are legal in Colorado; you really think that folks in neighboring states aren't going to be nipping across the border to pick up a quarter ounce for use at home?

Member Since: April 12, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 297
51. Astrometeor
3:17 AM GMT on February 01, 2014
Quoting 49. theshepherd:


No State Law can trump Federal Law.

I do not support Federal sanction.
Be careful when talking about Interstate Commerce. SCOTUS ruled long ago that even a home use agricultural venture can take a back seat to Companies involved in Interstate Commerce.

Link

Wickerd v. Filburn


State law trumps Federal Law when the Federal law violates the U.S. Constitution and the powers reserved to either the states or to the people.

Edit: In US v Lopez, the Supreme Court set restrictions on the commerce clause (although subsequent courts have not adhered to these restrictions):

It held that while Congress had broad lawmaking authority under the Commerce Clause, the power was limited, and did not extend so far from "commerce" as to authorize the regulation of the carrying of handguns, especially when there was no evidence that carrying them affected the economy on a massive scale.

Chief Justice Rehnquist, delivering the opinion of the Court, identified the three broad categories of activity that Congress could regulate under the Commerce Clause:

***the channels of interstate commerce,
***the instrumentalities of interstate commerce, or persons or things in interstate commerce, and
***activities that substantially affect or substantially relate to interstate commerce.


US v Lopez
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50. Astrometeor
3:16 AM GMT on February 01, 2014
Quoting 48. TheDevilsAdvocate:

Gonzales v. Raich



Scalia's concurrence:

Congress may regulate noneconomic intrastate activities only where the failure to do so “could … undercut” its regulation of interstate commerce.


That's interesting, but I disagree with the Court (and with Justice Scalia), on the grounds that because this is intrastate commerce, the necessary and proper clause nor the supremacy clause apply. As soon as the marijuana leaves the state borders, then it's illegal, but not within the state.

My AP Gov teacher (former lawyer) gave us her input on marijuana (and some other high profile laws). I guess you could consider her (and myself) strict Constitutionalists.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
49. theshepherd
4:42 PM GMT on January 31, 2014
Quoting 46. Astrometeor:
Okay, just wanted to say something about the federal government's response to Colorado. If the US government tried to sue Colorado, they would lose. Namely the fact that because the marijuana is grown and sold within state lines, no interstate commerce occurs and therefore the supremacy clause is trumped by the 10th Amendment.


No State Law can trump Federal Law.

I do not support Federal sanction.
Be careful when talking about Interstate Commerce. SCOTUS ruled long ago that even a home use agricultural venture can take a back seat to Companies involved in Interstate Commerce.

Link

Wickerd v. Filburn
Member Since: September 11, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 10167
48. TheDevilsAdvocate
4:34 PM GMT on January 31, 2014
Quoting 46. Astrometeor:
Okay, just wanted to say something about the federal government's response to Colorado. If the US government tried to sue Colorado, they would lose. Namely the fact that because the marijuana is grown and sold within state lines, no interstate commerce occurs and therefore the supremacy clause is trumped by the 10th Amendment.

Gonzales v. Raich

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47. theshepherd
4:21 PM GMT on January 31, 2014
Quoting 24. Naga5000:
Legalize it, tax it, regulate it's use like alcohol.



I'm about to have my first kid, I'm not sure exactly what I would say. But I can tell you that when I was a kid, it was already much easier to get pot than to get alcohol.

The Sociologist in me says: Like any substance, explain it to your kids, be open and honest with them about the substances, tell them your experience and the truths and fictions about the substance, and support them however you can. :)


Tell them the truth, for sure.
Tell them that the THC compound retards, hampers may be a better word, the maturity of the frontal lobes up until the average (but don't say average) age of 16 yoa. Compounds such as these should not be allowed to wander around an adolescent's brain. Like, ain't hormones enough?
Like the very plant we're talking about; you can't force a kid to grow, all you can do is help it be all it can be.
I was a Deputy Sheriff a long time ago, make sure you tell them also that 98% of all emergency room injuries associated with recreational chemicals are due to ethanol....and hormones are right up there with the rest.

Not much more to say about it at my house.

Smoke, shovel and shut up.

:)





Member Since: September 11, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 10167
46. Astrometeor
4:04 AM GMT on January 31, 2014
Okay, just wanted to say something about the federal government's response to Colorado. If the US government tried to sue Colorado, they would lose. Namely the fact that because the marijuana is grown and sold within state lines, no interstate commerce occurs and therefore the supremacy clause is trumped by the 10th Amendment.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
45. TheDevilsAdvocate
11:44 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 43. oregonbirdofprey:
RE:41,

DA, very good question. The way I see it, unfortunately, you can still be fired. In some states, "Right to work" states, like mine, you can be fired without cause of any kind. Employeers are not even required to give a reason. The only exception to this would be if you could prove discrimination of some kind.

Fired for legally smoking pot: The coming Colorado crackdown

This is the case of which I was thinking. Apparently, Colorado is one of the few states where you can't be fired by a private employer for engaging in legal activities outside of work. You can, however, be fired for toking up on your own time.

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44. oregonbirdofprey
11:36 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Good QOD Ric. I'm surprised nobody has posted against legalization yet.
Member Since: September 26, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 955
43. oregonbirdofprey
11:29 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
RE:41,

DA, very good question. The way I see it, unfortunately, you can still be fired. In some states, "Right to work" states, like mine, you can be fired without cause of any kind. Employeers are not even required to give a reason. The only exception to this would be if you could prove discrimination of some kind.
Member Since: September 26, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 955
42. ricderr
11:27 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
The courts have already ruled that since use of marijuana is a federal crime, you can be dismissed for it - even in Colorado.


OUCH!!!!!
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
41. TheDevilsAdvocate
11:23 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 40. oregonbirdofprey:
RE:38,

Doesn't matter what the law says, you can still loose your job if found to be intoxicated at work from using any substance, legal or not. Pot, alcohol, prescription drugs, whatever.
Agreed, but how about if you're not intoxicated at work but test positive from some extracurricular activities?

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40. oregonbirdofprey
11:19 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
RE:38,

Doesn't matter what the law says, you can still loose your job if found to be intoxicated at work from using any substance, legal or not. Pot, alcohol, prescription drugs, whatever.
Member Since: September 26, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 955
39. Naga5000
11:10 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 36. ricderr:
I agree with your comment, except for the bolded part. There is nothing racist about marijuana being illegal.. Every color, under the sun smokes it. Please don't try to make race an issue, as it is not.


thanx for posting sangria......i wonder if they were posting that concerning the enforcement as i believe i have read comments that minorities are penalized to a larger extent than whites


That's absolutely correct while usage rates are almost identical with a slight nod going towards white folks in the major 18 - 25 demographic. The laws are disproportionately enforced towards minorities, however. Here's a link to the Washington Post piece, for sake of argument we can ignore the commentary and focus on the graphs. Link
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3969
38. TheDevilsAdvocate
11:10 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 37. ricderr:
The problem is that it is still a federal crime to possess or sell marijuana. The US DOJ has said that the federal law won't be enforced if people don't violate state law but, if I'm not mistaken, that is solely at the discretion of federal prosecutors. Also, selling marijuana is a felony under federal law subject to a 5-year statute of limitations. Eric Holder might not be going after marijuana sellers in Colorado but the next US Attorney General (Ken Cuccinelli, anyone?) might feel differently and 5 years from now you could still be on the hook for a sale you made today


one of those can of worms i wonder about is if i visited colorado...chose to partake.....and then came back home where it is not legal and did not pass my employers drug test....would i still lose my job?
The courts have already ruled that since use of marijuana is a federal crime, you can be dismissed for it - even in Colorado.

Member Since: April 12, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 297
37. ricderr
11:08 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
The problem is that it is still a federal crime to possess or sell marijuana. The US DOJ has said that the federal law won't be enforced if people don't violate state law but, if I'm not mistaken, that is solely at the discretion of federal prosecutors. Also, selling marijuana is a felony under federal law subject to a 5-year statute of limitations. Eric Holder might not be going after marijuana sellers in Colorado but the next US Attorney General (Ken Cuccinelli, anyone?) might feel differently and 5 years from now you could still be on the hook for a sale you made today


one of those can of worms i wonder about is if i visited colorado...chose to partake.....and then came back home where it is not legal and did not pass my employers drug test....would i still lose my job?
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
36. ricderr
11:06 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
I agree with your comment, except for the bolded part. There is nothing racist about marijuana being illegal.. Every color, under the sun smokes it. Please don't try to make race an issue, as it is not.


thanx for posting sangria......i wonder if they were posting that concerning the enforcement as i believe i have read comments that minorities are penalized to a larger extent than whites
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
35. TheDevilsAdvocate
11:06 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
The problem is that it is still a federal crime to possess or sell marijuana. The US DOJ has said that the federal law won't be enforced if people don't violate state law but, if I'm not mistaken, that is solely at the discretion of federal prosecutors. Also, selling marijuana is a felony under federal law subject to a 5-year statute of limitations. Eric Holder might not be going after marijuana sellers in Colorado but the next US Attorney General (Ken Cuccinelli, anyone?) might feel differently and 5 years from now you could still be on the hook for a sale you made today.

Looks like a big old can of worms to me.

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34. Sangria
11:00 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 26. Neapolitan:
There are so many things wrong with America's utterly insane, trillion-dollar, decades-long, life-destroying, inarguably racist, completely disastrous, absolutely fruitless "War on Drugs" that I won't go into it. I'll just say this: look at the people most anxious to keep marijuana criminalized: police departments, prison subcontractors, weapons manufacturers, lawyers, drug cartels, and so on. That is, those who strongly profit from the current paradigm. Then look at those supporting legalization (or at least decriminalization) of marijuana: psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, doctors, etc.

Then decide whose side you're on.

Seems pretty easy to me. America has got a lot of things wrong in its history. Nixon's WOD is one of the most egregious, and it needs to end NOW...


I agree with your comment, except for the bolded part. There is nothing racist about marijuana being illegal.. Every color, under the sun smokes it. Please don't try to make race an issue, as it is not.
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33. StAugustineFL
10:56 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 23. ricderr:


frankly...i think you all are a bunch of pot heads...




Archie wouldn't stand a chance today with the "pussification" of America. Some subset of the population would be in an uproar which in reality they don't give two craps about.

On the topic, I agree with the legalization, moderation, and taxation comments others have mentioned.
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32. Naga5000
10:39 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 29. ricderr:
congrats naga....between jessica and i we have 9


Thanks! I think we are going to stick with one. One is a terrifying enough proposition. :)
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31. ricderr
9:38 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
astro...your opinion is always welcome...just every now and then to confirm we're adults we'll rap you on the head and call you a kid
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
30. pcola57
9:38 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Should have been legal years ago..

What I say to my children?
Well they aren't "Children" anymore..
I tell them..
Be adult..
If your gonna smoke..
Do it responsibly..

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29. ricderr
9:34 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
congrats naga....between jessica and i we have 9
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
28. Astrometeor
9:30 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 17. oregonbirdofprey:
RE:16

I think it's too soon to tell, not enough numbers in yet. So far in Washington, if nobody told you, you wouldn't know anything was different. There's been very little, almost no, public conversation about it. Nothing in the papers or on the TV news. It's so far what alot of us thought would happen, which is, basically, nothing.


Washington state has legalized pot, but sales there won’t begin for at least a few months.
Source

Nothing has happened in Washington because the state is still setting the system up with things such as licensing. Also, the local communities (Yakima City Council voted 6-1 to ban pot) have the power to ban pot (as do Colorado cities), so not everyone is free to smoke.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10500
27. Patrap
9:29 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129903
26. Neapolitan
9:28 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
There are so many things wrong with America's utterly insane, trillion-dollar, decades-long, life-destroying, inarguably racist, completely disastrous, absolutely fruitless "War on Drugs" that I won't go into it. I'll just say this: look at the people most anxious to keep marijuana criminalized: police departments, prison subcontractors, weapons manufacturers, lawyers, drug cartels, and so on. That is, those who strongly profit from the current paradigm. Then look at those supporting legalization (or at least decriminalization) of marijuana: psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, doctors, etc.

Then decide whose side you're on.

Seems pretty easy to me. America has got a lot of things wrong in its history. Nixon's WOD is one of the most egregious, and it needs to end NOW...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13805
25. Astrometeor
9:20 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Hmm, maybe a "kid" should step in here for a moment or two.

As a 17-year-old, I feel they might as well legalize the plant for recreational use. Just a waste of money spent sending all of these folks to jail over a plant that no one is sure yet as to the long-term negative consequences of it.

Make it legal, and then tax the hell out of it. That's one way to make it hard for people to get it, just make the product expensive. Funnel the tax-money into anti-drug and anti-smoking programs.

Having said that, I see no purpose in taking the drug. I am not interested whatsoever in taking a drug like that nor will I ever. There's an ever increasing chance that I won't ever drink a beer either, just don't see the point. I like the taste of water and fruit juice just fine.
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24. Naga5000
9:10 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Legalize it, tax it, regulate it's use like alcohol.

Quoting 3. ricderr:
thanx both of you.....do you have kids though and what would you say to them...if you don't mind


I'm about to have my first kid, I'm not sure exactly what I would say. But I can tell you that when I was a kid, it was already much easier to get pot than to get alcohol.

The Sociologist in me says: Like any substance, explain it to your kids, be open and honest with them about the substances, tell them your experience and the truths and fictions about the substance, and support them however you can. :)
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23. ricderr
9:05 PM GMT on January 25, 2014


frankly...i think you all are a bunch of pot heads...


Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
22. Dakster
8:46 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 20. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
the answer to the question of the day

well legalize it and put it in a control environment like the sale of booze age restrictions and access limited to adults only



I agree KOTG.

Also, it's a "plant" and not a manufactured and/or enhanced plant. Some standards, like with booze, will need to be addressed with it.

To answer the other concern. Cocaine, Meth (MDMA, X, Bath Salts, Etc.), and Heroine shouldn't ever be legalized. I haven't seen any medical reason for those, except for maybe Delodid - which is Heroine based.

Shouldn't be lightening up a fat one at school, for example. Just like you shouldn't be breaking out the six pack after high school sports either.
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21. ihave27windows
8:32 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 16. ricderr:
Ya lost me.....

'splain please.




english not my best language...just my only language....what i was trying to say....was i wonder how much have DUI's increased in states that have legalized the use of marijuana.......


Google it!
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20. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
8:05 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
the answer to the question of the day

well legalize it and put it in a control environment like the sale of booze age restrictions and access limited to adults only

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 178 Comments: 56141
19. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
7:59 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
like anything its the abuse of it that causes problems

ok smoke 2 or 3 spiffs in a day I guess its alright but its likely not good if yer smoking 3 or 4 every hr

like drinking have 1 or 2 during the day not going to kill ya but having 2 or 3 every hr well we all know how that's to work out
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 178 Comments: 56141
18. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
7:54 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 11. airman45:
Don't like it. However, in most of Europe, people do not go to jail for infractions such as marijuana. You are not made a lifelong criminal because of one toke.

The issue with me is......What will be legalized next? Cocaine?

As Ossqss said, just tax the heck out of marijuana. At least sme good will become of it.
same way in Canada get caught get a summons to go to court normally ends up dimiss or pay a small fine most peole smoke here anyway
and med weed is legal here I've signed for packages right at the front door for tenants that have med rights to it
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17. oregonbirdofprey
7:44 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
RE:16

I think it's too soon to tell, not enough numbers in yet. So far in Washington, if nobody told you, you wouldn't know anything was different. There's been very little, almost no, public conversation about it. Nothing in the papers or on the TV news. It's so far what alot of us thought would happen, which is, basically, nothing.
Member Since: September 26, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 955
16. ricderr
7:36 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Ya lost me.....

'splain please.




english not my best language...just my only language....what i was trying to say....was i wonder how much have DUI's increased in states that have legalized the use of marijuana.......
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
15. oregonbirdofprey
7:34 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
When I was young, probably the same for you Ric, instructions from my parents rarely (ok never) came with explanations or an invitation to ask questions. Drinking was an "adult" thing and when I was an adult I could choose to do what I wanted. More complicated these days. If they've reached the point where they're going to do what they want regardless I'll tell them there's opportunity to abuse not just pot but all types of things and they must concider the consequences and make intelligent choices... all things in moderation, have some pride in yourself and respect for others and the law (where it applies). Then I hope for the best.
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14. ihave27windows
6:49 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 12. airman45:


Perfectly said! In most federal positions, marijuana would be illegal to use, anyway. It doesn't matter if the law says it is legal.


Well, thank you! *curtsy left, curtsy right*
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13. ihave27windows
6:47 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 10. ricderr:
drive under the influence



i wonder how much they have increased


Ya lost me.....

'splain please.
Member Since: July 19, 2005 Posts: 108 Comments: 14933
12. airman45
6:46 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Quoting 9. ihave27windows:
Legalize it, tax the hell out of it, continue making it illegal to drive under the influence, and allow companies the right to continue drug testing, and whether or not they approve of their employees smoking. (was that a run-on sentence?)

And tell your children, it is like alcohol, and if they must indulge, do so in great moderation. Refrain when pregnant, and DON'T DRIVE!

Personally, I wouldn't smoke anything, ever, but I think our law enforcement needs to spend their precious time getting rid of these dangerous drugs that make people face eating zombies.

JMO


Perfectly said! In most federal positions, marijuana would be illegal to use, anyway. It doesn't matter if the law says it is legal.
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11. airman45
6:43 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Don't like it. However, in most of Europe, people do not go to jail for infractions such as marijuana. You are not made a lifelong criminal because of one toke.

The issue with me is......What will be legalized next? Cocaine?

As Ossqss said, just tax the heck out of marijuana. At least some good will become of it.
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10. ricderr
6:42 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
drive under the influence



i wonder how much they have increased
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374
9. ihave27windows
6:39 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
Legalize it, tax the hell out of it, continue making it illegal to drive under the influence, and allow companies the right to continue drug testing, and whether or not they approve of their employees smoking. (was that a run-on sentence?)

And tell your children, it is like alcohol, and if they must indulge, do so in great moderation. Refrain when pregnant, and DON'T DRIVE!

Personally, I wouldn't smoke anything, ever, but I think our law enforcement needs to spend their precious time getting rid of these dangerous drugs that make people face eating zombies.

JMO
Member Since: July 19, 2005 Posts: 108 Comments: 14933
8. ricderr
6:39 PM GMT on January 25, 2014
oss...i think i read that cal is expected to rake in 1.4 billion in taxes
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 676 Comments: 22374

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