The Daily Bug

Under the Boardwalk - Beach Music and The Shag

By: palmettobug53, 8:51 PM GMT on July 27, 2008

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The Drifters


One of the biggest things about living in the Lowcountry, whether it be SC, NC or Georgia, is the prevalence of Beach Music and The Shag, which just happens to be the South Carolina State Dance. I loved listening to The Tams, The Platters, Maurice Williams and The Zodiacs, The Tempations, The Drifters and Marvin Gaye, to name a few. It has been the soundtrack of my life, even though it has been overshadowed at times by The Beatles, The Stones, Southern Rock, Woodstock, etc. There was always that undercurrent of that relaxed music and the fancy footwork of The Shag.

I love watching people do The Shag. I never learned, myself, as it seems like no one I hung out with listened to beach music much or knew how to do the dance. It was the Age of Aquarius, remember, the Age of Rock and Roll and the dancing was pretty much free form! LOL

My Dad, on the other hand, is a master. I never knew it until I was grown. Shocked the daylights out of me! We were attending the wedding and reception of my cousin's daughter. They had a live band and there was food galore and lots of dancing. One of the cousins sitting at our table said, "Look at Uncle G!" I turned around and there, tripping the light fantastic, was my Dad and my SMom! The fluid movements, the dips, the swirls and that fancy footwork.... I don't remember what the band was playing but it had to be one of the classic beach songs.

This is a dance that is usually slow and relaxed and where the man struts his stuff and the woman follows along, like a peacock and his peahen. You feminists out there may take offense (!) but to me, it shows the Southern Gentleman at his best. It's a dance that can be done, no matter what your age. You may have to slack up some on the fancy steps, as you get older, but an older, well matched couple can be pure poetry in motion.

There's not much more I can say, that these websites can say better, so.... browse through them, remember Saturday nights at the beach Pavilions and hum along:

Oh when the sun beats down and burns the tar up on the roof.
And your shoes get so hot, you wish your tired feet were fire-proof.
Under the Boardwalk, down by the sea
On a blanket with my baby, is where I'll be.

(Under the Boardwalk)
Out of the sun.
(Under the Boardwalk)
Man, we'll be having some fun.
(Under the Boardwalk)
People walkin' above.
(Under the Boardwalk)
We'll be falling in love under the Boardwalk,

Boardwalk.

From the palms you hear the happy sounds of the carousel,
and you can almost taste the hot-dogs and french fries they sell.
Under the Boardwalk, down by the sea
on a blanket with my baby, is where I'll be.

(Under the Boardwalk)
Out of the sun.
(Under the Boardwalk)
Man, we'll be having some fun.
(Under the Boardwalk)
People walkin' above.
(Under the Boardwalk)
We'll be falling in love under the Boardwalk,

Boardwalk.

Under the Boardwalk, down by the sea
On a blanket with my baby, is where I'll be.

Under the Boardwalk, down by the sea
On a blanket with my baby, is where I'll be.



100 Greatest Beach Music Hits

Beach Music

Carolina Shag

Shagging in the Carolinas

Shag Dancing - A History Of Sorts

Beach Shag.com

Carolina Shag History

Chatham Area Shag

And here's a place where you can buy shoes specifically for shagging: ShagShoes.com

Keep in mind, though, that a lot of what you see on YouTube is the fancier stuff, usually performed in competition. The general run of folks doing The Shag don't get that fancy!

Watch it on YouTube!

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Updated: 3:30 AM GMT on August 02, 2008

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Getting a Handle on Handles

By: palmettobug53, 1:41 AM GMT on July 20, 2008

Hello


"What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet."


Wm. Shakespeare


Or not. It all depends on what the name or handle is.

Handles came about as an adjunct to Citizen Band Radio. CB, as it came to be called, originated in the U.S. around 1945 as a way to allow the average person to communicate via radio. Users were assigned a call sign, which was a grouping of letters and, sometimes, numbers.

During the 1973 oil crisis, 55 mph speed limits were enforced in the U.S. to save gas. Truck drivers used CB radio to alert other truckers to the presence of highway patrol, stations with gas, speed traps, driving hazards or to alert authorities to accidents on the road. (This being before the Age of Cell Phones) The general public started getting in on the CB craze, as well. It was during this time that people started using nicknames, or handles, instead of their call signs.


My dad had a CB for a while in the early to mid '70's. At the time he got his CB, he was driving a dark blue 1965 Ford Galaxy 500. I'm not really sure if there was any big need for a CB, though he and some of his coworkers would use it during the day. Dad taught agricultural courses at Sumter TEC and spent a lot of time out at the TEC farm, near the Sumter airport, or driving out in the country visiting the local farmers. There was a phone in the office out there, I think, but sometimes I guess they just didn't feel like using it. They could be a bit aways from the office on the other side of the farm. I digress.... His students had given a nickname to his car. "Yep, Mr. J. is here. I see Old Blue parked over there." I guess it was inevitable that his handle wound up being "Old Blue".

When I first found Wunderground and started lurking around, I noticed quite the array of user names or handles. On the whole, most of them seemed to reflect something about the person themselves. It was either their interest in the weather, whether severe, tropical or just the "I like watching weather" types. Some indicated where they lived. Some of them obviously pertained to special interests, other than weather. Nifty names, cute names, serious names or very creative names. And there were some that left me scratching my head, wondering what they meant! Most of them obviously took some thought. Some appeared to have been chosen while the owner was either too sleepy,too tipsy or too hyped up on coffee to think properly. Others looked the the results of a panic stricken, last minute, "OH GOD, I"VE GOT TO PICK A NAME RIGHT NOW TO COMPLETE MY SIGN UP FORM AND MY MIND'S GONE BLANK" situation and one that the owner has probably regretted ever since. LOL

Once I decided to sign up, the next big hurdle was to pick out a handle. I'd noticed that, in almost every single case, handles wound up being shortened. When storms were brewing and lots of people were conversing on the blogs, a very long handle just takes too much time to type out. Some names shortened better than others. I had quite a bit to think about..... It took me almost a week to come up with something I liked and that fit what I perceived as the proper parameters of a successful handle. It was going to be my name here and I'd better like it from the get go.

I wanted a name that said something about me and my personality. It had to be original. Easily shortened. I also wanted a name that said something about where I lived, either my city or my state. There were a few abortive tries, as my first few choices were already taken, even though I didn't see them in the blog directory. Junebug was one of them, if I recall correctly. I realized later that the names in the directory are only those for which the person has actually set up a blog entry. I first thought it was a listing of the members.

I wound up with Palmettobug53. Nothing much says more about SC than palmetto trees. It's our state emblem. And we're overrun with palmetto bugs. It was easily shortened to palmetto, palm, pbug, bug. The 53 was tacked on to the end because I saw so many handles at the time that had numbers in them. I thought it was de rigeur. What did I know? I'd never used a chat room, forum or blogged before. So, for all of you who have wondered, here's the answer: 53 was my age at the time of signing up. So far, no one has called me "53". I think that would make me feel like an answer to second question about Life, the Universe and Everything. The first one was '42", if you remember correctly.

There was another aspect to the name, palmettobug. One of my favorite poets is Don Marquis. He is the one that wrote all those bits about Archie, the cockroach, and his friend, Mehitabel. Which is why the Bugmobile is sometimes called Archie.

Hubby was totally thrown by my choice. I HATE palmetto bugs. The little German ones, not so much. The BIG ONES?!!! Those B52 bombers? OMIGOD! You want to see me do a lift off that would make NASA proud? Out of the blue, in the middle of a general conversation, slowly point over my shoulder at the wall behind me and stutter... "R.r.r.r.rOOOOOAAACH!" I do not mind snakes, bugs, frogs, toads, spiders, etc. But roaches? I just smashed one in the kitty pan last night. I felt like the Fat Broad in the comic strip BC, when she spies that poor snake. WHAM! WHAM! WHAM!

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.


What is the hidden meaning or story behind your handle? How did you choose what you did?

Come on, now.

'Fess up.

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Updated: 9:16 PM GMT on July 27, 2008

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A Kid's Place Was In The Yard

By: palmettobug53, 12:09 AM GMT on July 14, 2008

Tire swing

From my last blog:

15. auburn 3:27 AM GMT on July 08, 2008

I wasnt allowed to stay in the house during the day bug...a kids place was in the yard...LOL


Aubie, that's the truth, wasn't it?

No sirree, Bob. If the weather was nice (and sometimes, even when it wasn't!), we were told to "You young'uns get outside!" It got us out of Mom's hair and out of her way, while she was cleaning house, washing clothes, cooking. (Very few moms worked back then.) There was no lolling about the house in front of the TV. Programming back in the 50's and 60's was pretty limited. Only two or three stations and daytime programming was mostly soap operas and some game shows. I really don't remember much, as we were all outside, playing. Home computers, with the Internet and their associated games, forums and blogs, were an age away for my generation. I know we played outside a lot in wintertime, as they are fairly mild in our area of the U.S. That was weekends, only; night fell earlier, school was in session and homework abounded. It's the summers that I remember the best.

I can't recall anyone back then having A/C (barring a few stores), so in the summertime, it was probably cooler outside than inside. You could usually find a shady spot to play and maybe catch a better breeze. And those long summer evenings! We stayed outside from the time we got up until the time the neighborhood mothers started calling us all in to bathe and go to bed. There was never a lack of things to do.

We played Cowboys and Indians, Yankees vs Rebels, Allies vs Germans and Cops and Robbers. We roller skated on the basketball court in the school playground and rode bicycles. We played with those plastic army men, building battlefields in the dirt. If we got too hot, we played under the sprinkler or with the hose. Some of us had store bought swingsets. Others had homemade ones, with either a board seat suspended by chains or an old tire hung from a rope.

Most of the neighborhood boys had BB guns and were constantly being admonished to "Don't shoot at people, houses, cars, squirrels, birds or your sister." I got my BB gun for my 16th birthday. I set up all kinds of targets and built small towns out of matchboxes and stuff and just blasted them to pieces, pretending to be a sniper. I wasn't your typical girly-girl! Dad bought me a device that would throw a target into the air and I'd shoot at that. I still have that BB gun, by the way. It's so old, and has so little power, when you shoot it you can watch the BB come out of the barrel and droop to the ground. Not good for much more than scaring the occasional stray dog that gets after the cats or raccoons or possums trying to access the garbage cans. And sometimes, it doesn't even do that! LOL

We wandered the fields and wooded areas in the neighborhood and built forts. We swung on vines, pretending we were Tarzan and doing "The Yell". We built tree houses. We climbed trees... well, everyone else did. I wasn't much of a tree climber - I've got no head for heights! Bubba, on the other hand, was a monkey. We waded in the neighborhood ditches, ponds and marshes, catching minnows, crawdads, fiddler crabs and bullfrogs. We scooped up toad eggs, to watch them hatch into tadpoles and then toads. We caught lizards and paraded around with them dangling from our earlobes. Some of the braver ones caught snakes.

We picked and ate wild plums and dewberries in season. We chewed on sourgrass. None of which was washed first and none of us died from germs. We got poison ivy, too, and there was usually one of us running around with splotches of calamine lotion on.

In the evenings after supper, and as the heat of the day was waning, we'd gather in someone's backyard and the games would begin. Kickball, dodgeball, Red Rover, baseball, Simon Says, hopscotch, a dozen varieties of tag and chase and hide-and-go-seek. The older boys, and even a few local dads, would sometimes get up a game of half-rubber. And if we couldn't get enough kids together to play a game, we chased fireflies or just lay in the grass and looked at the Milky Way. No light pollution back then, either.

Occasionally, on Sunday afternoons, we'd break out the croquet set. That's when the adults would really join in the fun.

I know I'm looking at this through rose colored glasses but I think there is a lot to be said for those days. We used our imaginations and made up games or new rules to old ones. As far as I can recall, there weren't too many chubby children back then, either. We got too much exercise. Though we did get plenty of cuts, scrapes, sprains, broken bones and stickers in bare feet from time to time, no one really worried about us too much. And we didn't worry much about "strangers", either, if you know what I mean.

Sometimes I wish I could go back to those carefree days. Don't you?


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Updated: 1:40 AM GMT on July 20, 2008

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Are You Game?

By: palmettobug53, 2:54 AM GMT on July 08, 2008

uncle wiggily

Back in the days before television was available to the masses, folks entertained themselves in their leisure time by listening to the radio, reading, sewing, knitting, crocheting or doing some other type of needlework. For strictly fun, they worked jigsaw puzzles, played games or cards. Now, I'm not quite so old that I don't remember a time without TV but when I was growing up, we didn't watch the tube, non-stop, the way so many of us do now. There were certain shows that we never missed but the TV was off more than it was on. Us kids played outside as long as possible. There were no couch potatoes back then, let me tell you!

The earliest game I remember playing was Uncle Wiggily. I don't really remember much about it but I do know it was how I learned to count to 100. In the summer, we always spent a week with my maternal grandmother. She kept a box of toys and games for us to play with. There was always a jigsaw puzzle to work on. There was a checkerboard. We played Tripoli, or Michigan Rummy as it was also called. There was a deck of Old Maid cards. And we'd play Go Fish, from time to time. Gramma was a devout Episcopalian, so Tripoli and the card games were not allowed on Sundays.

At home, we had Monopoly and Scrabble . Mama and I worked more jigsaw puzzles over the years, than I can count. Dad was not much on playing Monopoly or Scrabble but he'd sit and pick at the puzzles a bit. ( Now that he's retired, he works jigsaw puzzles quite a bit.) When doing sleepovers with friends, they'd pull out their family board or card games. I remember playing Parcheesi a few times but the rest are long buried in my memory.

Dad's family wasn't much on board games but they did love to play Canasta! Especially in the summers, when Dad and his brothers and parents rented a house out at Folly for a week. The grownups would play Canasta every night. I wanted to learn how to play so badly but they kept telling me that I wasn't old enough yet. I think they thought that it was too complicated. To pacify me, Mama taught me how to play a couple of Solitare games: Canfield and Clock. That worked for a few years but I still yearned to play Canasta. Finally, when I was about 12, Mama relented. I LOVED it! Mama and the rest always played partners' Canasta. I never got the knack of doing that. In any kind of card game, really, which is probably why I never had any desire to learn whist or bridge.

Over the years, as I hung out with different groups of friends, I learned to play basic Rummy and Spades. Never got the hang of Hearts, which is Hubby's family's favorite card game. I think that's because in Spades, you try to take all the tricks. In Hearts, you try not to, unless you can take them all. I would always get all bobbled up and mess up. It got to the point where they didn't want me to play anymore. Which suited me fine; I really didn't like it much. LOL The neighbors across the street introduced us to Uno, which easy to learn, great for all ages and is a blast to play.

Mama and Dad and some friends played a weekly Rook game for a number of years but I never picked up on that. That was after they moved to Sumter. Before they moved up there, Mama was a member of a ladies poker club for a few years. They didn't play 5 or 7 card stud or any of the regular poker games. They played a lot of "sissy" poker games, I guess you'd call them. The only one I remember the name of was "Baseball". I have no idea how it was played. I think their card club was really more of a social occasion; a ladies' night out, with more gossiping and refreshments than there was poker playing. They played for pennies and nickels and a big win might have been about $2.00.

Hubby and I have played a bit of Trivial Pursuit, charades, pictionary and other games from time with friends.

It just seems like people just don't play games the way they used to. I miss that.

Isn't it about time to cut that TV off, gather the family or neighbors 'round and break out a game?


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Updated: 12:06 AM GMT on July 14, 2008

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About palmettobug53

WU member since Oct. 2005. I enjoy reading, crafts, crosswords, puttering in the yard, old movies and hanging out with my friends on WU.