GROWING POTATOES IN BAGS

By: organicfarmingblog , 7:38 AM GMT on May 16, 2014

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Growingpotatopix3 300x200 GROWING POTATOES IN BAGS

Photo by: http://www.gardenista.com/files/img/sub/700_potato -grow-bag.jpg


 

How do you like to plant potato above ground? It’s an easy and perfect way to grow potatoes, especially in a limited space.

Growing potato in a plastic bag can be a fun experience for children and may even get their interest into gardening.  Another good reason to grow potatoes in containers is to avoid a fungus known as “blight”. This fungus causes the leaves and stem to quickly blacken and rot causing the plant to die. Blight usually infects potatoes in their garden bed.

Potatoes are best planted in March for harvesting in summer and autumn. A second cropping can be done in August until September to harvest in time for Christmas.

Lets’ get started… The first thing to do is to prepare the seed potato by placing them in a warm place in order to grow shoots on the tuber. This will result in faster growth and heavier crops. Do this a week before planting them. You will know that they are ready when the sprouts are about half inch long and cut them in chunks making sure that there are two sprouts each. Have them sit for three days in a room temperature.

Cut several holes at the bottom of the bags to serve as drainage holes. A 30 gallon black bag would be ideal.  Fill it up with a good quality compost or potting soil about 1/3 of the way and place the bag in a nice sunny spot in the garden. It would be a great idea to dust the seed potatoes with agricultural sulfur before planting them. Place the seed potato on top of the compost or soil. Be sure that they are at least 2 inches deep with eyes pointed up and water them well.

Add more soil when they are about 8 inches high with few leaves above the dirt. Water them well, but not too much.

You will know that they are ready for harvesting when their leaves turns yellow. No more watering at this stage to let their skin dry. This will take about three weeks.  You may also want to do a gentle digging just below the surface to check on the potato size. If you find them too small, leave them be for another week, otherwise, it’s harvest time!  Set them out to dry and cure their skin. You may store them in a sack in a dark place. Never use polythene bags, potatoes will rot quickly.

Planning for the next BBQ party? What could be a better match than a freshly dug potato!

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