The Impacts of weather and climate extremes on the Caribbean, and mitigation measures

By: nigel20 , 9:36 PM GMT on December 31, 2013

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Recent and past weather and climate extremes suggest that the Caribbean is lacking in many aspects. I've created this blog to highlight weather and climate extremes as well as ways to mitigate against these impacts. You're welcome to post articles or individual posts based on your opinion.

Thanks, Nigel in Jamaica.


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71. nigel20
4:46 AM GMT on June 04, 2014
Caribbean seeks to take full advantage of new U.N. climate fund

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, May 30 2014 (IPS) - The South Korea-based Green Climate Fund (GCF) is open for business, and Caribbean countries are hoping that it will prove to be much more beneficial than other global initiatives established to deal with the impact of climate change.

"Despite our region's well-known, high vulnerability and exposure to climate change, Caribbean countries have not accessed or mobilised international climate finance at levels commensurate with our needs," said Dr. Warren Smith, the president of the Barbados-based Caribbean Development Bank (CDB).

The CDB, which ended its annual board of governors meeting here on Thursday, May 29, had the opportunity for a first-hand dialogue on the operations on the GCF, through its executive director, Hela Cheikhrouhou, who delivered the 15th annual William Demas Memorial lecture.

But even as she addressed the topic "The Green Climate Fund – Great Expectations," Smith reminded his audience that on a daily basis the Caribbean was becoming more aware of the severe threat posed by climate change.
...
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
70. nigel20
4:51 AM GMT on May 27, 2014
Carib choices: Climate change impact or MDGs

By Desmond Brown

ST. JOHN’S, Antigua, May 21, 2014 (IPS) - Climate change is forcing the nine-member Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) to choose between expending scarce resources to deal with its impact or other pressing development goals.

“There is a very thin line between consumption and conservation…progress and protection,” Grenada’s Environment Minister Roland Bhola told IPS. He explained that countries still have to fulfil the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which include reducing poverty and hunger, while dealing with the impacts of climate change.
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69. nigel20
4:21 AM GMT on May 22, 2014
Caribbean Forced to Choose Between Climate Change Impact and MDGs

ST. JOHN’S, Antigua, May 21 (IPS) - Climate change is forcing the nine-member Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) to choose between expending scarce resources to deal with its impact or other pressing development goals.

“There is a very thin line between consumption and conservation…progress and protection,” Grenada’s Environment Minister Roland Bhola told IPS. He explained that countries still have to fulfil the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which include reducing poverty and hunger, while dealing with the impacts of climate change.

But there is a flicker of hope for these countries. The European Union (EU) has signed a financial agreement for 39.5 million East Caribbean dollars for a project designed to improve the sub-region’s natural resource base and its resilience to impacts of climate change.[pullquote]3[/pullquote]

The OECS consists of the islands of Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat, Anguilla and the British Virgin islands.

Head of the EU delegation to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, ambassador Mikael Barford, has acknowledged that this is a “very vulnerable region” and that the project is a reflection of Europe’s commitment to support climate action in developing countries.
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68. nigel20
9:28 PM GMT on May 12, 2014
Caribbean Wants More Than 'One Size Fits All' Strategy In Dealing With Climate Change

SANTIAGO (Chile), May 12 (NNN-CMC) -- When it comes to dealing with the impact of climate change on the agricultural sector, Caribbean countries are letting it be known that the "one size fits all "strategy is not for them.

In fact, as they emerged from a closed door meeting with the Director General of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Dr Jose Graziano da Silva on Thursday, representatives of the Caribbean delegations said that was the message conveyed to the head of the UN body.

"We have requested the FAO to deal with the Caribbean in a differentiated manner rather than lump us together with Latin America and the Caribbean," Guyana's Agriculture Minister Dr. Leslie Ramsammy told the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC).

"Whenever that happens we get pushed aside as small states and we believe that (as) small vulnerable states our special vulnerability to climate change should be taken into consideration," he added.
...
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67. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
7:11 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
nigel20 has created a new entry.
66. nigel20
5:04 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
Yes, no doubt about that. I definitely hope that efforts will be more coordinated, this will help to limit the spread of the virus.
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65. BaltimoreBrian
4:33 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
That's very good to hear Nigel. It was a big problem in Reunion (overseas French territory) several years ago. I hope its spread can be stopped!

I have a feeling this will be a disaster in Haiti.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
64. nigel20
4:31 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
Caribbean Islands still recovering after Christmas storm

By Larry Luxner · May 5, 2014

St. Vincent, St. Lucia and Dominica — three of the world’s smallest countries — are still in shock after a freak Christmas Eve storm ripped through the Eastern Caribbean, destroying crops, houses and livelihoods in its wake.

At a Jan. 16 news conference at the Washington headquarters of the Organization of American States, the three nations’ ambassadors to the United States issued appeals for urgent humanitarian aid. Following their speeches, José Miguel Insulza, secretary-general of the OAS, presented the diplomats with checks for $20,000 each — a symbolic gesture meant to convey the idea that every donation, no matter how small, is important.

- See more at: http://lapostexaminer.com/caribbean-islands-still- recovering-christmas-storm/2014/05/05#sthash.BUbyL gmp.dpuf
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63. nigel20
2:57 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
Thanks Brian! Ministry officials are being proactive, measures are being put in place to limit its spread. Well, at least in Jamaica.

Health Ministry prepares as Chikungunya spreads across Caribbean
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
62. BaltimoreBrian
2:48 AM GMT on May 09, 2014
*** Chikungunya fever: A painful virus finds a new home in the Americas
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
61. BaltimoreBrian
5:05 AM GMT on May 08, 2014
PatrioticThinking, you can always go back to a duplicated comment and replace it with a period. Sometimes it is best to link to a report directly.
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60. PatrioticThinking
11:32 AM GMT on May 07, 2014
Sorry for the double post guys...
Member Since: December 11, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 12
58. PatrioticThinking
11:29 AM GMT on May 07, 2014
A new White House report
on how climate change will affect the United States is a catalog of
doomsday scenarios that could play out in every region of the country —
billion-dollar floods in Boston, killer heat waves in Chicago,
forest-scorching wildfires in the Rockies and toxic algae in the Great
Lakes.






It details how rising
sea levels, higher temperatures and extreme weather could change
everyday life and local economies in America if they proceed apace.There
will be effects at every level: individual (rain-swamped sewage systems
could give your child diarrhea); community-based (a storm surge could
wipe out your waterfront condo complex); and sweeping (whole forests
changing species).


Report Warns More Weather Extremes on the Horizon for US

NBC News












Could lack of water
leave parts of the West uninhabitable as the end of the century nears?
Will Phoenix, Arizona, simply become too hot a place to live? Could East
Coast flooding turn Manhattan into a place to avoid?"There will be some population shifts,” said Doug Parker, director of the California Institute for Water Resources."But
I don't think there will be wholesale (changes) — like no one can live
in Phoenix anymore, although people there may eventually begin to ask
themselves how much they’re really willing to pay for air conditioning."






The bigger questions will come later, with the most dramatic changes taking place decades from now.That's
why Minda Berbeco of the National Center for Science Education said
it's crucial that the adults of tomorrow — who will be forced to contend
with the fish-poisoning outbreaks, virus-carrying mosquitos, chronic
water shortages and crop losses — are educated on the climate changes
happening today."It's not only a
multigenerational problem — it's a huge opportunity," she said. "For
each of the challenges pointed out in the report, there's an opportunity
to work with mitigation and adaptation. This isn't just an adult
problem. It's an everyone problem."Here are just some of the worst-case scenarios outlined in the report, region by region:Northeast(Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey,
New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, District
of Columbia)
  • Heat-related deaths in Manhattan could nearly double by 2080, with increases in other urban areas as well.
  • Breeding
    grounds for the Asian Tiger Mosquito may double by the end of the
    century, exposing 30 million people to the threat of West Nile Virus.
  • By
    2100, some 2.3 million people in the mid-Atlantic states alone would be
    at risk from a three-foot sea level rise. One model shows $94 billion
    in flooding damage in Boston by century's end.
  • Increased
    rainfall would likely swamp sewage systems and spread waterborne
    disease, giving children diarrhea and other stomach illnesses.
  • Aggressive weeds will thrive in warmer temperatures and become resistant to herbicides, putting crops at risk.








Image:
Matt Rourke / AP


Floods, like this one in Philadelphia, will get worse and more common as the decades pass.

Southeast(Alabama,
Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin
Islands)
  • Storm surges
    could wipe out property in Palm Coast, Fla., Cape Coral-Fort Myers,
    Fla., and Myrtle Beach, S.C. Coastline erosion will attack Miami, Tampa,
    Charleston and Virginia Beach.
  • Heavy rain could cause inland
    flooding and overwhelm drainage systems in Southeast Florida, and
    saltwater intrusions into freshwater sources could compromise drinking
    water aquifers.
  • Coastal counties in Alabama, Mississippi,
    Louisiana and Texas could get socked with $23 billion losses from rising
    sea levels by 2030.
  • Native communities in southeast Louisiana —
    a state that has already lost 1,880 square miles in the last 80 years —
    will see their land swamped.
  • Insurance costs for coastal
    properties may rise or become unavailable, forcing residents from
    vulnerable areas, turning some communities into ghost towns and causing
    crowding in others.
  • An increase in ground-level ozone is
    predicted for 19 of the largest urban centers, leading to more deaths
    and hospital admissions.
  • Dairy farms may be forced northward.
    Livestock yields could drop as much as 10% by 2060. In Georgia, by 2020,
    corn yields are expected to fall 15% and wheat by 20%.
  • Local
    economies dependent on seafood could be battered if a reduction in
    wetlands affects fishery habitats and ocean warming plays havoc with
    spawning seasons and sparks a shift in species.
  • Ciguatero fish poisoning might spike in the wake of more algae blooms.
Midwest






(Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin)
  • Heat
    waves would cause up to 2,200 more deaths in Chicago alone under one
    model. Higher temperatures across the region will produce more pollen
    and pollution and associated human illnesses.
  • The Great Lakes
    surface temperatures could jump 7% by 2050 and 12% by 2100, fostering
    the growth of toxic algae and invasive species.
  • Heat-triggered
    changes in growing seasons could drive down corn and soybean yields by
    later in the century, while freezes could devastate other crops. Heat
    waves during pollination may also cause lower crop yields.
  • Snowmelt combined with with heavy rainfall is set to unleash catastrophic floods.
  • An
    anticipated 120% increase in sewer overflows into Lake Michican by 2100
    under one estimate could cause illness, close beaches and disrupt the
    tourism economy.
Great Plains(Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Wyoming)
  • The
    number of days where the mercury tops 100 degrees could double in the
    north of the region and quadruple in the south by 2050.
  • Dry spells in Texas and Oklahoma would be extended by five days, on average, by 2050.
  • A rising sea level will translate into storm-surge damage along the Gulf coast of Texas.
  • The
    northern plains could see extremes in precipitation with increased
    snowfall, rapid spring warming and rain combining to bring devastating
    floods.
  • At its worst, loss of water in the southern plains might
    force a shift from irrigated to dryland agriculture and cut crop yields
    in half.








Image: Smoke rises near power lines with Cucamonga Peak in the distance at a wildfire in Rancho Cucamonga, California
DAVID MCNEW / Reuters


Wildfires like this one in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., will burn more U.S. acreage because of climate change, scientists say.
Southwest(Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah)
  • Wildfires
    increase with a doubling of the burned area in the southern Rockies and
    a 74% increase in the burned area of California toward end of the
    century.
  • Some 420,000 people (almost double the current amount) could be at risk from a 1-in-100-years flood in California.
  • Droughts will be hotter. In the Colorado River Basin, they are predicted to be more frequent, intense and longer-lasting.
  • Native tribes could lose traditional foods, medicines and water supplies with higher temperatures and drought.
  • There's the potential for large drops in crop yields after 2050 as the temperatures breach optimum growing levels.
Northwest






(Idaho, Oregon, Washington)
  • Median annual area burned by wildfires expected to quadruple to 2 million acres.
  • By the 2080s, subalpine forest may convert to other types.
  • The risk of water-short years goes up from 14% now to 32% by 2020 and 77% by 2080.
  • Suitable
    habitat for four trout species is predicted to decline 47% by 2020 due
    to the effects of rising temperatures and flooding.
  • Shorebirds and forage fish by an increase in flooding of coastal lands in Washington and Oregon.
  • Ferry
    terminals, storm water outfalls and wastewater treatment plants on the
    Puget Sound could be threatened by flooding and erosion.
Alaska
  • Northern waters could be virtually ice-free by the 2030s
  • Polar bears would be jeaopardized. Walruses may abandon the ice and come to land, where stampedes can occur.
  • Shrinking glaciers will have a negative effect on hydropower production, ocean circulation patterns and fisheries.
  • Permafrost,
    the frozen ground that restricts drainage, will be gone from large
    parts of the state by end of the century. Uneven sinking of the ground
    will add billions to infrastructure maintenance over the next 20 years.
  • Wildfires
    are predicted to double by 2050 and triple by 2100, and forests could
    shift from spruce to broad-leaf trees by the end of the century.
Hawaii






  • Ocean warming will lead to the loss of coral reefs and extensive loss of reef fish.
  • Higher sea levels could wipe out tourist beaches.
NBC News' Alan Boyle and Helen Popkin contributed to this report.



First published May 6th 2014, 1:47 pm
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57. BaltimoreBrian
3:33 AM GMT on May 03, 2014
Thank you Nigel! You find good articles on the Caribbean.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
56. nigel20
7:14 PM GMT on May 02, 2014
Thanks Brian! :)
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
55. BaltimoreBrian
5:43 AM GMT on May 02, 2014
One for my next list Nigel :)
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
54. nigel20
4:30 AM GMT on May 01, 2014
Caribbean fears loss of ‘Keystone Species’ to climate change

CODRINGTON, Barbuda, April 26, 2014 (IPS) - A marine biologist has cautioned that the mass deaths of starfish along the United States west coast in recent months could also occur in the Caribbean region because of climate change, threatening the vital fishing sector.

Since June 2013, scientists began noticing that starfish, which they say function as keystone species in the marine ecosystem, have been mysteriously dying by the millions.

“The cause of the starfish die-off which is taking place in the Pacific Ocean is not known at this time but it could turn out to be from a number of factors including climate change,” John Mussington told IPS.

“If it turns out that climate change factors such as ocean warming are indeed implicated in the starfish die-off, then there is the possibility that the same thing could happen in the Atlantic and affect Caribbean species.

“We are living in an era when the predicted consequences of climate change are now reality. Large scale die-off of can therefore happen to us in the Caribbean,” Mussington added.
...
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53. nigel20
5:08 AM GMT on April 23, 2014
Climate Change Comes to the Caribbean

The future of our planet looks pretty bleak. The latest report released by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) paints a dire picture: climate change is here to stay, and we%u2019re not doing enough to prepare ourselves.

Extreme weather events from hurricanes to floods and droughts will leave virtually no corner of our planet untouched. Climate chaos will undoubtedly inflict damage upon wealthier nations, but no one is more vulnerable than the world%u2019s poor.

The Latin American and Caribbean region is home to dozens of low- and middle-income countries that are still struggling to develop. Many depend on the warm waters and mild weather of the Caribbean to sustain their crucial agriculture and tourism industries. Climate change threatens the livelihoods of millions of people across the region who rely on these sectors to survive.

The small island nations of the Caribbean depend on the ocean as a source of food and income. Catching and eating fish have been traditions in the region for centuries, and fish remain a dietary staple. However, this heavy reliance on the ocean for sustenance may be upended by climate change. According to a recent report, the world%u2019s oceans will see a 170-percent rise in acidity by the end of the century, which could prove devastating for global fish stocks that are already overexploited.
...
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52. nigel20
4:39 AM GMT on April 18, 2014
Thank you, Brian!
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
51. BaltimoreBrian
2:52 AM GMT on April 18, 2014
Added to the list! Thanks!
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
50. nigel20
7:39 PM GMT on April 16, 2014
Saving Caribbean Tourism from the Sea

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Apr 16 2014 (IPS) - Faced with the prospect of losing miles of beautiful white beaches – and the millions in tourist dollars that come with them – from erosion driven by climate change, Barbados is taking steps to protect its coastline as a matter of economic survival.

“We need to be able to preserve those beaches. We need to be able to preserve our coral reefs. We need to preserve the marine life of our country, which is part of what tourists come to the Caribbean for,” Ronald Sanders, a former regional diplomat, told IPS.

“All of those things are now, even as we speak, being eroded, and sitting back and doing nothing about it is not in our interest,” he said.

“If there is continuous erosion of the beaches, that is the very thing that you are selling worldwide. You are saying ‘we have great beaches, come and enjoy them and pay for the privilege’, but if you have no beaches, what are you selling?” Sanders added.

Tourism is one of the largest industries in the world, with an estimated 500 million people spending billions of dollars on tourism-related services annually. In addition, the industry employs more than 100 million people worldwide.

Tourism accounts for 15 percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in Barbados, with the beaches playing a significant role.
...
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49. nigel20
7:23 AM GMT on April 10, 2014
Thanks Brian! :)
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
48. BaltimoreBrian
1:00 AM GMT on April 10, 2014
Added to my daily list :) Here are a couple for you.

Genetic circuits: Bacterial 'FM radio' created



Novel ultra-fast electrical circuits use light-generated tunneling currents

Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
47. nigel20
4:31 AM GMT on April 09, 2014
Grant funding available for Climate Change Technology

St. Kitts and Nevis (WINN): A call is being made for entrepreneurs in St. Kitts and Nevis to apply for grant funding for an innovative climate change technology project. The funding is made possible through the Caribbean Climate Innovation Center, a World Bank supported initiative executed by a consortium comprising the

Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI) in Trinidad and Tobago and the Scientific Research Council (SRC) in Jamaica. Through this grant scheme, up to US$50,000 is being made available to entrepreneurs with concepts or prototypes that fall within five (5) thematic areas: (a) Resource use Efficiency/Recycling (b) Water & Waste Management (c) Sustainable Agribusiness (d) Solar Energy and (e) Energy Efficiency. The deadline for the current proposal is April 20th 2014. Representatives of SRC and Quintessence Consulting were on the Breakfast Show earlier this week to promote the concept grant funding scheme. Mona White of SRC explained the initiative.
...
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46. nigel20
5:59 PM GMT on April 03, 2014
Quoting 45. BaltimoreBrian:
I'm gonna steal the article in comment 44 for tomorrow's list if you don't mind :)

Not at all! I'm quite happy when share the above articles.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
45. BaltimoreBrian
4:35 AM GMT on April 03, 2014
I'm gonna steal the article in comment 44 for tomorrow's list if you don't mind :)
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
44. nigel20
6:19 AM GMT on March 27, 2014
New Program To Build Regional Climate Capacity Launched

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is launching a new program to build regional capacity for climate change adaptation in the Eastern Caribbean, in partnership with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH). A launch ceremony will be held at CIMH in St. James, Barbados, on March 27 at 3pm. Remarks will be given by U.S. Ambassador Larry Palmer, WMO Chief Wayne Elliott and CIMH Principal David Farrell. A photo opportunity and press briefing will follow. Approximately forty attendees are expected, including members of the press and local stakeholders.

The impacts of climate change pose a serious threat to the Caribbean region. These impacts include changing weather and precipitation patterns, more frequent and intense storms, greater flooding and drought, sea level rise that is accelerating coastal erosion, saltwater intrusion to coastal aquifers that threatens freshwater supplies, and increased air and sea surface temperatures that influence hurricane severity. These impacts are projected to worsen in the coming years, threatening infrastructure, economic activity, agricultural productivity, coastal ecosystems and reefs, fisheries, and community livelihoods and well-being.
...
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43. nigel20
4:46 AM GMT on March 20, 2014
Quoting 42. BaltimoreBrian:
That's good news Nigel. A lot of creeks and small rivers must come from the rain-soaked Blue Mountains. And I believe the population of Jamaica is not growing very rapidly, which reduces environmental pressures.

Yes, that is correct. It is unlikely that our population will surpass 3 million before 2025. Jamaica has a population of 2.7 million people (latest census data).
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
42. BaltimoreBrian
4:25 AM GMT on March 19, 2014
That's good news Nigel. A lot of creeks and small rivers must come from the rain-soaked Blue Mountains. And I believe the population of Jamaica is not growing very rapidly, which reduces environmental pressures.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
41. nigel20
6:53 PM GMT on March 18, 2014
A bit of good news as it relates to water resources in Jamaica, but it's poorly distributed.

We have enough water

Gov't agency says island won't run out of precious commodity any time soon

JAMAICA will not run out of fresh water any time soon, the Government agency charged with ensuring the sustainability of the island's water resources has said.

It might be little consolation for the farmers in the breadbasket parish of St Elizabeth grappling with drought conditions and residents of Kingston and St Andrew enduring nightly water restrictions, but the Water Resources Authority (WRA) said the country uses less than 25 per cent of its reserves per year.

Speaking with the reporters and editors at the weekly Jamaica Observer Monday Exchange yesterday, WRA Managing Director Basil Fernandez said what feeds the perception that there isn't enough water is the uneven distribution of water resources across the island.

The resources are categorised as groundwater — supplied by springs and aquifers — and surface water — supplied primarily by rainfall.

"Our evaluation indicates that there is enough water... I don't want you to believe that because there is drought or dry season, or because you hear that there isn't enough water in Hermitage Dam means that is the issue across island," Fernandez said, pointing out that towns like Black River and May Pen "don't have a problem with water because they have groundwater".

"We are only using about 22-24 per cent of our available water resources. Roughly 90 per cent of our reserves are tied up in groundwater," he continued.
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40. nigel20
4:38 AM GMT on March 18, 2014
Caribbean to Forge United Front on Elusive Climate Finance

Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, the of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, says the promises of money by the "biggest polluters in the world" for small island developing states (SIDS) like his to adapt to climate change are a mostly a "mirage”.

But as chair of the 15-member Caribbean Community (CARICOM) grouping, Gonsalves will be playing a lead role in getting the region to coordinate a united front on climate finance."The big polluters, they make commitments of all sorts of monies but it is a mirage and the closer you get to it you realise it is not there, it recedes." -- CARICOM Chair Ralph Gonsalves

"We agreed on the establishment of a task force on climate change and small island developing states to provide guidance to Caribbean climate change negotiators, their ministers and political leaders in order to ensure the of the region in the negotiations," he told IPS following the CARICOM summit that ended here on Tuesday.

Gonsalves said the region is now preparing for two important meetings in September – the U.N. Climate Change Summit and the Third U.N. SIDS in Samoa.

Guyanese President Donald Ramotar, who made a presentation at CARICOM’s closed-door summit, told IPS that it was important for the leaders themselves to get involved in the negotiations "and to make our voices heard on this matter, because as you know we have been the least contributors to climate change, but we are among the first to feel the big effects.”

Ramotar said the tragedy that occurred when a slow moving low-level trough hit St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica and St. Lucia on Christmas Eve last year, killing more than a dozen people and leaving damages estimated at more than 100 million dollars, "is just the latest reminder how vulnerable our region is".
...
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39. nigel20
4:36 AM GMT on March 18, 2014
Thanks Brian! It is definitely a big problem, though not as bad as four years ago. Police data suggest that gangs are responsible for in excess of 70% of our annual murders.

Hey PatrioticThinking, i don't think i'm the most qualified person to answer your question.
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38. BaltimoreBrian
1:04 AM GMT on March 18, 2014
Jamaica's gang culture: Bad Vybz

How big a problem is this?
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37. PatrioticThinking
11:15 AM GMT on March 13, 2014
MY QUESTION then is how do you feel about the global activities
our governments currently partakes in such as "SRM" Solar radiation
management? or "ELF" extremely low frequency projects undoubtedly 
noticeable to the human eye. We see it before and during almost every
weather event now and I am not sure if its there attempt to slow the
cooling or worse yet is it a catch 22 where it is creating a Venus
syndrome effect upon our planet.  Just curious on your thought on there
two acronyms mostly SRM and the effort they are making to increase our
planets libido. Also the massive damage it has caused and is causing at
an alarming rate as well such as a thousand fold worse in the
acidification of our waterways and soil.  Please site this video for a
scientific explanation.
          &n bsp; """Geo-engineering The Silence of Genocide""
Thanks Nigel      Dustin NJ USA
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36. nigel20
7:29 PM GMT on March 11, 2014
Awesome article, Brian! This is why i love Physics and a bit of Chemistry, there are always new discoveries. :)
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35. BaltimoreBrian
4:03 AM GMT on March 11, 2014
A shocking diet: Researchers describe microbe that 'eats' electricity

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34. nigel20
1:53 AM GMT on March 02, 2014
Quoting 33. BaltimoreBrian:
Nigel let me know if I can put your new article on my Sunday reading list.

Hey Brian! You definitely can.
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33. BaltimoreBrian
6:46 AM GMT on March 01, 2014
Nigel let me know if I can put your new article on my Sunday reading list.
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32. nigel20
3:39 AM GMT on March 01, 2014
Indoor mini-farms to beat climate change

Jewel Fraser

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad, Thursday February 27, 2014 IPS - Industrial engineer Ancel Bhagwandeen thinks that growing your food indoors is a great way to protect crops from the stresses of climate change. So he developed a hydroponic system that "leverages the nanoclimates in houses so that the house effectively protects the produce the same way it protects us," he says. Bhagwandeen told IPS that his hydroponic project was also developed "to leverage the growth of the urban landscape and high-density housing, so that by growing your own food at home, you mitigate the cost of food prices."

Hydroponics, a method of growing plants without soil using mineral nutrients in water, is increasingly considered a viable means to ensure food security in light of climate change.

His project is one of several being considered for further development by the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC), headquartered in Jamaica.

The newly launched CCIC, which is funded mainly by the World Bank and the government of Canada, seeks to fund innovative projects that will "change the way we live, work and build to suit a changing climate," said Everton Hanson, the CCIC's CEO.

A first step to developing such projects is through Proof of Concept (POC) funding, which makes available grants from 25,000 to 50,000 dollars to successful applicants to "help the entrepreneur to finance those costs that are related to proving that the idea can work," said Hanson.



Read more: http://www.caribbean360.com/index.php/business/110 7087.html#ixzz2ugshILPf
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
31. nigel20
8:16 PM GMT on February 22, 2014
Thanks Brian! :)
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
30. BaltimoreBrian
4:05 AM GMT on February 22, 2014


GLOBAL COOLING THREATENS EARTH!



Quote from the article:

Experts say that the Arctic ice is getting thicker by the day. "Even places like Jamaica will have an average daily temperature of only 40 degrees (Fahrenheit) within five years."

Watch out, Nigel! :P
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
29. nigel20
7:25 PM GMT on February 16, 2014
Quoting 28. VirginIslandsVisitor:
Hi Nigel

I realize this so not on subject with your blog but had to post it.

Link

Lindy :0)

Thanks Very much, Lindy!

They're (Jamaica Bobsleigh team) representing Jamaica and the Caribbean well.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
28. VirginIslandsVisitor
4:04 PM GMT on February 16, 2014
Hi Nigel

I realize this so not on subject with your blog but had to post it.

Link

Lindy :0)
Member Since: July 30, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 631
27. nigel20
8:37 PM GMT on February 14, 2014
^^^
These are weather related, so it is difficult to associate with climate change. Maybe climate change is having an indirect impact (more water vapour in the atmosphere and weakening of the jet stream), but this is yet to be determined.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
26. nigel20
8:31 PM GMT on February 14, 2014
Climate change: Prevention better, less costly than cure

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Anyone who has been observing weather patterns worldwide over the past few years will notice the increasing effects of climate change.

Unusually cold weather in the United States south in recent weeks, as well as the unseasonal rains that devastated a number of Eastern Caribbean islands over the last Christmas holidays, have been just two of the latest examples of what is going wrong.

Now, we are seeing worrisome flooding in the south of England which, we are told, was triggered by a global weather system resulting in persistent rainfall over Indonesia and the tropical West Pacific. The upshot has been a series of severe Atlantic storms that have not only flooded thousands of homes in Britain but, according to the Met Office in England, has been responsible for "the exceptionally cold weather in North America".

Weather experts say, as well, that this is "the wettest winter" in England since 1766, and the series of Atlantic storms that are at the root of this disaster are set to continue for several weeks.
...
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
25. nigel20
9:38 PM GMT on February 05, 2014
Hurricane-Resistant Caribbean Farming?

February 4, 2014 | 6:01 am

Could Jeffery Bruney save Caribbean agriculture?

Cornell University graduate and Dominican farmer Jeffery Bruney has big plans: to modernize Dominica’s agriculture with what he’s calling a “hurricane resistant farming model.”

“What really makes this system hurricane resistant is two things: number one, one part of the system is portable so when the storm is coming you put it away,” Bruney says. “The other part of the system that is more suitable for a larger, more commercial facility is a system which involves concrete rafts or a long narrow concrete swimming pool, filled with water and a nutrient solution. When the storm is coming, you lower everything and you cover it. When you lower the water level, the plants are submerged into the system and you cover it.”

The model, according to Bruney, is based on hyrdoponics and aquaponics — that is, growing without soil.

“The nutrient solution which I use for the system I make. It is made out of some basic ingredients, molasses, oxygen and worm [fertilizer],” he says.
Part of the system includes a worm farm, which would form part of a special nutrient cocktail that includes fish urine.
...
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
24. nigel20
5:59 PM GMT on February 04, 2014
Hi Dave! Thank you very much, i hope that you'll visit my blogs more often! :)

Yes, i would gladly send most of the rain to California if i Could. It has been very wet across sections of the Caribbean. The eastern Caribbean had extreme flooding in December. While we had localized flooding here in Jamaica.
I really hope that you guys will get some relief in the short term.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
23. DaveFive
7:49 AM GMT on February 04, 2014
Hello nigel20,
I'm Dave from San Jose, California, USA. You have excellent weather information reports on the climate change in the Caribbean. It would be ideal if 75% of the rainfall that has fallen there this past year, would come over here to the west coast of California where we have a drought going on.
Member Since: August 16, 2013 Posts: 9 Comments: 311
22. nigel20
8:23 PM GMT on February 02, 2014
Hi Brian! Yes, go ahead...it's a great article.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8153
21. BaltimoreBrian
4:57 AM GMT on February 02, 2014
Hey is it cool if I put "In the Caribbean, Fighting Climate Change With Entrepreneurship" on my list?
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630

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