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JULY TROPICAL STORMS (1851-2011):

By: ncforecaster, 5:34 AM GMT on July 05, 2012

Hey everyone,

This particular blog entry will continue our examination of the entire historical record (1851-present), with a focus on "July" Tropical Cyclone (TC) activity throughout the Atlantic Basin. A "July" TC will be characterized as one that initially developed at some point during the month of July (i.e. July 1-July 31). Those Tropical storms (TS)-shown by year-that achieved hurricane (H) and/or "major" hurricane (MH) intensity will be designated by bold case print in the following respective sections.

ALL TROPICAL STORMS:

5 = 2005 (1 H/2 MH).

4 = 1966 (3 H) and 1995 (1 H).

3 = 1933 (1 H July, Aug.), 1944 (2 H), 1997 (2 H), 2008 (1 H/1 MH), and 2011.

2 = 1851 (1 H), 1864 (1 H), 1887 (1 H), 1901 (1 H), 1908 (1 H), 1916 (1 H/1 MH), 1926 (1 MH/1 MH Aug.), 1934, 1936 (1 H), 1959, 1960 (1 H), 1973 (1 STS/1 H), 1979 (1 H), 1985 (1 H), 1989 (1 H), 1990 (1 H), 1996 (1 H/1 MH), 2003, and 2006.

1 = 1859, 1861, 1866, 1867, 1870, 1872, 1874, 1878, 1886, 1888, 1891, 1893, 1896, 1899, 1903, 1909 (MH), 1912, 1915 (H Aug), 1917, 1919, 1924, 1931, 1937, 1943, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1961 (MH), 1964, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974 (STS), 1975, 1976, 1978, 1991, 1998, 2002, 2007, and 2010.

0 = 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1860, 1862, 1863, 1865, 1868, 1869, 1871, 1873, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1889, 1890, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1897, 1898, 1900, 1902, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1910, 1911, 1913, 1914, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1935, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1957, 1958, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, and 2009.

Note: Storm #1 (H Arlene) of 1963, storm #3 (MH Celia) of 1970, storm #4 (H Dean) of 1989, storm #3 (TS Ceasar) of 1990, and storm #1 (MH Alex) of 2004 were each a late "July" TC that didn't achieve TS intensity until August.

In addition: Storm #2 of 1867 (H), storm #5 of 1887 (TS), storm #2 of 1899 (H), storm #3 of 1908 (TS), storm #4 of 1908 (TS), storm #1 of 1915 (H), storm #2 of 1926 (MH), storm #5 of 1933 (H), storm #5 of 1936 (TS), storm #1 of 1937 (TS), storm #3 of 1944 (H), storm #1 of 1947 (TS), storm #1 of 1955 (TS Brenda), storm #2 of 1964 (TS), storm #1 of 1969 (TS Ana), storm #2 of 1973 (STS Alpha), storm #2 of 1976 (TS Anna), storm #3 of 1989 (H Chantal), storm #2 of 1990 (H Bertha), storm #5 of 1995 (H Erin), storm #1 of 1998 (TS Alex), and storm #3 of 2007 (TS Chantal) were each a July TC of at least TS intensity that were also of at least TS intensity into the month of August as well. Each storms respective "August" maximum intensity is listed in parenthesis.



This is a visible satellite image of the most intense "July" TC to have ever been observed anywhere within the Atlantic Basin. At the time of this satellite image, Hurricane "Emily" was a very powerful 155 mph category four storm. Less than 4 1/2 hours thereafter, it achieved its maximum intensity of 160 mph/929 mb. In doing so, it became the first known category five H ever known to have developed within the Atlantic Basin prior to the month of August.

ALL U.S. TROPICAL STORM LANDFALLS:

Note: These totals combine both Tropical Storm and Hurricane landfalls (i.e. all named storms).

3 = 1916 (1 H/1 MH) and 2005 (1 H/1 MH).

2 = 1901 (1 H), 1908 (1 H), 1933 (1 H), 1936 (1 H), 1959, and 1979 (1 H).

1 = 1866, 1870, 1872, 1874, 1878, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1891, 1896, 1899 (Aug. H), 1909 (MH), 1912, 1919, 1926, 1931, 1934, 1937, 1943, 1946, 1948, 1954, 1960, 1970, 1978, 1981, 1985, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2006, 2008, and 2010.

Note: Storm #2 of 1899 also made a U.S. landfall as a H in August, as well as a TS in July.

ALL U.S. HURRICANE LANDFALLS:

2 = 1916 (1 MH), 1959, and 2005 (1 MH).

1 = 1866, 1870, 1886, 1887, 1891, 1896, 1901, 1908, 1909 (MH), 1926, 1933, 1934, 1936, 1943, 1979, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2003, and 2008.

ALL U.S. MAJOR HURRICANE LANDFALLS:

1 = 1909, 1916, and 2005.



This is a visible satellite image of the most intense "July" TC to ever make landfall along the U.S. shoreline. This particular image of Hurricane "Dennis" was taken at 2:15 pm CDT on July 10, 2005-just 10 minutes prior to its eye coming ashore. At landfall, it had a MSW of 120 mph and a lowest central pressure of 946 mb.

INTERESTING FACTS:

1) All Atlantic Basin Tropical Storms:

a) Total number of Atlantic basin tropical storms: There were a total of 114 "July" TS or STS systems that developed in the Atlantic Basin during the 161 year period of 1851-2011. These figures equate to one "July" TS formation every 1.41 years.

The aforementioned total accounts for 3 "June" TC's that achieved TS intensity (for the first time) during the month of July. Of these, one went on to become a MH, as well.

Also, there were 7 "June" TC's of either TS or H intensity that at least retained TS intensity into the month of July. They are storm #1 of 1857 (TS), storm #3 of 1886 (H), storm #2 of 1933 (H), storm #1 of 1975 (TS Amy), storm #2 of 1981 (TS Bret), storm #2 of 2003 (TS Bill), and storm #1 of 2010 (H Alex).

There were also 5 additional "July" Tropical cyclones that didn't achieve TS intensity until August. Of these, 4 achieved hurricane intensity-two of which went on to become a "major" hurricane in the month of "August".

b) Total number of Atlantic basin hurricanes: There were a total of 54 TC's that achieved hurricane (H) intensity during the month of July for the aforementioned 161 year period. That equates to one July H every 2.98 years on average.

c) Total number of Atlantic basin "major" hurricanes: There were a total of 8 TC's that ultimately achieved "major" hurricane intensity at some point during the month of July. This would constitute a statistical mean of one July MH traversing some portion of the Atlantic Basin every 17.9 years.

The aforementioned figures account for the one "June" TC that also achieved MH intensity (for the first time) during the month of July.

d) The most intense July hurricane: Hurricane Emily of 2005 currently holds the record as the most intense July hurricane to ever develop in the Atlantic Basin. It achieved category five intensity around 8 pm EDT on July 16, 2005. At the time, it contained a MSW of 160 mph and a corresponding BP of 929 mb. Hurricane Dennis (also of July 2005) is a close second with a category four intensity of 150 mph and 938 mb (was as low as 930 mb at one point).

e) The most recent July tropical storm: There were three seperate tropical storms that developed during the 2011 H season. Two of the three tropical storms (TS Bret and TS Cindy) almost achieved minimal H intensity and maxed out with a MSW of 70 mph. TS Don formed on July 27 and achieved its maximum intensity of 50 mph over the western Gulf of Mexico very late on July 28. As TS Don closed in on the south Texas shoreline, it encountered increasing vertical wind shear and wrapped very dry air into its circulation. As a result, tropical storm Don had weakened to a 35 mph tropical depression by the time it crossed the south TX. coastline (near Baffin Bay, TX.) very late on July 29.

f) The most recent "July" huricane: Hurricane Dolly of 2008 is the most recent "July" hurricane to develop in the Atlantic basin. It became a hurricane around 4 pm CDT on July 22, 2008. At the time, it was located about 165 nm ESE of Brownsville, TX, in the Gulf of Mexico. It would go on to achieve a maximum intensity of 100 mph/963 mb at 9 am CDT on July 23, before coming ashore as a moderate category one hurricane on South Padre Island, TX-at 120 pm CDT on the same day.

g) The longest period without a "July" tropical storm: The two longest periods of consecutive years without a TC developing anywhere in the Atlantic Basin-during the month of July-were 1852-1859 and 1879-1886. In addition, 88 out of the 161 hurricane seasons (55%) in the historical record, didn't have a TS form during the entire month of July.

h) The most tropical storms to develop in one season: The 2005 Atlantic Basin hurricane season was definitely the most prolific for "July" TC formations-with 5.

1) The most hurricanes to develop in one season: The 1966 and 2005 Atlantic basin hurricane seasons hold the record for spawning the most hurricanes-during the month of July-with 3 each, respectively.

j) The most "major" hurricanes to develop in one season: The 2005 H season holds the record for spawning the most "major" hurricanes-during the month of July-with 2.

2) All U.S. Tropical Storm Landfalls:

a) Total number of U.S. tropical storm strikes: There were 53
July TS or STS systems
that made a U.S. landfall (or strike) during the aforementioned 161 year year period. This equates to one July TS landfall per 3.04 years. Moreover, a full 46.5% of all July Atlantic Basin storms made landfall in the U.S. This is a reflection of the primary breeding grounds (for this time of year) being located in such close proximity to the U.S. coastline.

b) Total number of U.S. hurricane strikes: There were 26 hurricanes that made a direct strike on the U.S. coastline during the month of July. This equates to one land falling July hurricane every 6.2 years. Furthermore, a full 48.1% of all July Atlantic basin hurricanes struck the U.S. coastline.

c) Total number of U.S. "major" hurricane strikes: There were 3 "major" hurricanes that made landfall in the U.S. during the month of July. They are the 1909 "Velasco" TX category three storm, 1916 Mississippi category three, and category three hurricane Dennis of 2005. This equates to a "major" U.S. land falling hurricane every 53.6 years.

d) The most intense U.S. TC landfall: Hurricane Dennis of 2005 currently holds the record as the most intense TC to make a U.S. landfall during the month of July. It struck the Florida Panhandle between Pensacola Beach and Navarre Beach as a 120 mph/946 mb category three hurricane. The 1916 Mississippi category three is a very close second on the list at 120 mph/950 mb at the time of its landfall in the U.S.

e) The most recent U.S. hurricane strike: Hurricane Dolly of 2008 is the most recent hurricane to have made landfall on the U.S. shoreline in July. It made landfall on South Padre Island, about 15 nm SE of Port Mansfield, TX at 120 pm EDT on July 23, 2008. At landfall, it was a category one hurricane with a MSW of 85 mph and a BP of 967 mb.

f) The most recent U.S. tropical storm strike: TS Bonnie of 2010 is the most recent July TC of TS intensity to make a U.S. landfall. It came ashore near Elliot Key, Fl. as a weakening 40 mph TS at 930 am on July 23.

g) The longest period without a "July" U.S. tropical storm strike: The longest periods of consecutive years without a land falling U.S. TS-during the month of July-include 1851-1866, 1879-1886, 1902-1908, 1920-1926, 1961-1970, 1971-1978, and 1986-1994. The most recent "July" TS (or H) to make a U.S. landfall was TS Bonnie in 2010 (as noted above).

h) The most tropical storms to make a U.S. landfall in one season: The 1916 and 2005 H seasons had the most land falling Tropical storms-for the month of July-with 3 each, respectively.

i) The most hurricanes to make a U.S. landfall in one season: The 1916, 1959, and 2005 Atlantic basin hurricane seasons lead the way for U.S. hurricane landfalls-during the month of July-with 2 each, respectively.

j) The most "major" hurricanes to make a U.S. landfall in one season: The 1909, 1916, and 2005 H seasons each had 1 U.S. land falling hurricane that came ashore at MH intensity.

FUTURE BLOG ENTRIES:

I will post additional blog entries (similar to this one) for the other respective months of a calendar year. With that in mind, the next entry should be a thorough examination of the entire climatological record for "August" TC's in the Atlantic Basin.

As always, thank you so much for taking the time to read and/or post in my blogs. I hope each one of you have a great rest of the day!:)

Most sincerely,
Tony

Updated: 6:39 AM GMT on February 03, 2013

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