Hurricane Sandy One To Be Closely Monitored For All Along the US Eastern Seaboard

By: hurricaneben , 10:34 PM GMT on October 26, 2012

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The US Eastern Seaboard, from North Carolina to Maine, continue to anxiously prepare for a storm that could be unlike any other--maybe not that historic, but something quite unprecedented without a doubt. As Cuba & Jamaica continue to slowly recover from severe surge/wind damage which killed nearly 40 throughout the Caribbean, The Bahamas is finally seeing weather conditions slowly improve. The Florida East Coast has been (and is still) receiving some milder, but still significant, effects such as wind gusts over 50 MPH and minor coastal flooding but nothing considerable in terms of damage. Further up the coast, along the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast US, impacts may be a bit more significant impacts with winds as high as hurricane force and moderate coastal/inland flooding likely impacts--the system's center is forecast to come ashore Lower New Jersey area as an extratropical storm with winds of borderline hurricane-force so that's definitely enough to do some quite sustainable damage but how much impacts exactly is still unclear. Also inland higher elevations may see winter-storm to even blizzard conditions so a lot of hazards with Sandy--as more models come into a better agreement of Sandy merging with a trough of low pressure...generating a powerful storm for extratropical status.

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5. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
9:56 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
hurricaneben has created a new entry.
4. hurricaneben
9:36 PM GMT on October 27, 2012
Quoting gberet69:
Hi Ben
Here in mid-coast Maine we are as ready as we can be. The wife and I got a generator (4KW) last year and wood for the stove. Our only problem is our greenhouse that's attached to the house (passive solar).

Ron in Waldoboro


Looks like you're ready for the storm. Wish you and your wife a safe time riding out the storm. In Florida, the winds have gotten gusty but nothing too bad.
Member Since: May 15, 2009 Posts: 419 Comments: 679
3. hurricaneben
9:35 PM GMT on October 27, 2012
Quoting originalLT:
Hi Ben, as of Sat. morning, it sure looks like this storm will be of "historic" proportions. For me, in Stamford CT. they are saying, at least a 24 hour period of 50-70mph winds, with gusts over hurricane force. It is this extreme length of time of very strong winds that will do the damage. I'm sure I will lose power, just hope the giant oak tree I have, thats only 20ft to the East of my house, can stay up. It is huge, it's base has a 3 ft diameter, and is 60-70ft tall. Of course it still has half it's leaves on it which isn't good. Also we expect 5-10 inches of rain. After the storm, when I have power back, I'll report in. Tidal surge is not a problem for me, I am about 4 miles inland from Long Island sound , at an elevation of 155ft.


Yes while the winds itself aren't overly damaging, it's forecast to be prolonged so widespread power outages are a certainty. Good luck with your oak tree, hope it makes it, but it's your life and the life of your loved ones that matter the most. Stay safe.
Member Since: May 15, 2009 Posts: 419 Comments: 679
2. gberet69
9:23 PM GMT on October 27, 2012
Hi Ben
Here in mid-coast Maine we are as ready as we can be. The wife and I got a generator (4KW) last year and wood for the stove. Our only problem is our greenhouse that's attached to the house (passive solar).

Ron in Waldoboro
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 333
1. originalLT
1:11 PM GMT on October 27, 2012
Hi Ben, as of Sat. morning, it sure looks like this storm will be of "historic" proportions. For me, in Stamford CT. they are saying, at least a 24 hour period of 50-70mph winds, with gusts over hurricane force. It is this extreme length of time of very strong winds that will do the damage. I'm sure I will lose power, just hope the giant oak tree I have, thats only 20ft to the East of my house, can stay up. It is huge, it's base has a 3 ft diameter, and is 60-70ft tall. Of course it still has half it's leaves on it which isn't good. Also we expect 5-10 inches of rain. After the storm, when I have power back, I'll report in. Tidal surge is not a problem for me, I am about 4 miles inland from Long Island sound , at an elevation of 155ft.
Member Since: January 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7503

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About hurricaneben

Will devote this hurricane season to provide up-to-the-minute, basic information when a tropical system is threatening land. Both basins included.