TERRAFORM MOON WITH EARTHS Co2

By: cyclonebuster , 4:27 PM GMT on December 18, 2010

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We are at 390 ppm Co2 now in Earths atmosphere. Why not restore it to 280 ppm Co2 like it was prior to the industrial revolution. If we were to shoot the moon with projectiles filled with (DRY ICE Co2) this could potentially Terra Form the moon. Solar powered rail guns could do the trick without creating more Co2. SEE:


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Use the "Rail Gun" which is solar powered to shoot Earths Co2 to the moon to reduce Co2 here on Earth to cool the planet back down to pre-industrial revolution temperatures. The rail gun would emit zero greenhouse gasses since it is solar powered. Simple right? What that would do to the moon is give it a chance to grow trees which create oxygen and thus we can introduce all kinds of life there and have a nice vacation spot to go to. Basically take a weapon of war and create life with it. You like?

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18. cyclonebuster
8:23 PM GMT on December 23, 2010
Quoting CybrTeddy:


No it wouldn't. We don't even know if Gliese 581g is even real yet its still unconfirmed its existence.


Really? Its next door neighbor may also have what it takes.

Alien planet may be in habitable zone after all
Gliese 581d has just-right distance range that can allow liquid water to exist The alien planet Gliese 581g has been getting a lot of attention recently as a possibly habitable world, but a case is building for its next-door neighbor as a good candidate for extraterrestrial life, too.

Gliese 581d, another planet discovered around the star Gliese 581, may well lie in the "habitable zone" of the star %u2014 that just-right distance range that can allow liquid water to exist %u2014 new atmospheric-modeling research suggests. The finding follows closely on the heels of a similar study, published earlier this year, that reached the same provisional conclusion. [ Tour of the planets around star Gliese 581.]

"The fact that two models find conditions for liquid water could exist, that strongly implies that it is possible," said the new study's lead author, Philip von Paris of the Institute for Planetary Research at the German Aerospace Center in Berlin. "It doesn't seem impossible to have life there."

The Gliese 581 system: Worlds of possibilities
Gliese 581 is a red dwarf located 20 light-years from Earth, just a stone's throw in the cosmic scheme of things. Astronomers have detected six planets orbiting the star.

Gliese 581g is about three times as massive as Earth, and it's likely a rocky world. It also lies right in the middle of the habitable zone, making it a prime candidate for liquid water and life as we know it %u2014 if the planet exists.

But some researchers question the analysis used to discover the planet, and say they cannot confirm 581g in follow-up studies. The planet's discoverers, however, are standing by their find.

The two planets on either side of 581g skirt the edges of the habitable zone and thus have inspired interest and intrigue since their discovery in 2007. Gliese 581g's interior neighbor, 581c, was once thought a good candidate for liquid water, but studies have shown that a greenhouse effect likely makes the planet too hot.
581d, on the other hand, orbits outside of 581g, far enough away that researchers first thought it too cold for life. But a strong greenhouse effect may warm 581d up substantially, perhaps enough to support liquid water, according to the new study.

Modeling an alien atmosphere
Gliese 581d is probably seven to eight times as massive as Earth, and astronomers suspect it's rocky like our home planet. The alien world's gravity is likely strong enough to hold onto an atmosphere, though researchers have yet to confirm and characterize 581d's air.

Von Paris and his team modeled the surface conditions that could result on 581d from several different types of atmosphere, using our own solar system as a guide. They assumed, for example, an atmosphere composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide and nitrogen %u2014 all of which are found in the air of the rocky planets Earth, Mars and Venus.

The research team ran simulations at different concentrations of carbon dioxide, mimicking the levels found in our solar system. Various runs assumed different amounts of CO2 mirroring the levels found on Earth now, on the early Earth and on Mars and Venus now.

The team's model also varied atmospheric pressure from low to high.

In the end, the researchers found that several of these atmospheric scenarios resulted in average surface temperatures above 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) %u2014 meaning Gliese 581d might well harbor liquid water.

A medium- or high-pressure atmosphere with 95 percent CO2 would do the trick, they found. So would a high-pressure one with just 5 percent CO2.

"I found it quite exciting that, even for the 5 percent carbon dioxide atmosphere, we obtained habitable conditions in one case," von Paris told SPACE.com.

Von Paris and his colleagues published their results in the November issue of the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Lots of caveats
Another atmospheric-modeling study published earlier this year also suggested that a strong greenhouse effect %u2014 driven by lots of CO2 %u2014 could make Gliese 581d warm enough for liquid water. Other research teams have reached similar conclusions over the past several years.

Such work, while intriguing, remains provisional and speculative. Von Paris and his team looked to our own solar system for guidance, but their model is based on educated guesses.

"The problem, of course, is that you don't know anything about the atmosphere," von Paris said.

Astronomers aren't even sure that Gliese 581d is a rocky planet, like Earth or Mars or Venus. They think it is, based on its size, but further research will be needed to confirm this.

While von Paris is the first to mention such caveats and unknowns, he's excited by the possibility that 581d could support liquid water %u2014 especially since the universe is so vast and the hunt for alien planets is still in its infancy. While astronomers have detected more than 500 alien worlds, the first one was discovered less than 20 years ago, in 1992.

"Gliese 581 is our next-door neighbor, among the 100 nearest stars," von Paris said. "My point of view is, this kind of implies that such planets may be reasonably common."

Link

Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
17. cyclonebuster
6:09 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting MichaelSTL:


It is also worth noting that Mars has such a thin atmosphere because the solar wind literally rips it away, due to the lack of a magnetic field (or more accurately, one like Earth's which completely surrounds the planet).


If not then we can still use the Co2 as a propellant for spaceships to go to the inner solar system.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
15. cyclonebuster
5:56 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Use the "Rail Gun" which is solar powered to shoot Earths Co2 to the moon to reduce Co2 here on Earth to cool the planet back down to pre-industrial revolution temperatures. The rail gun would emit zero greenhouse gasses since it is solar powered. Simple right? What that would do to the moon is give it a chance to grow trees which create oxygen and thus we can introduce all kinds of life there and have a nice vacation spot to go to. Basically take a weapon of war and create life with it. You like?
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
14. CybrTeddy
5:48 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting cyclonebuster:


It would get a chance to survive where the shines and where it becomes dark like on gliese 581g.

Link


No it wouldn't. We don't even know if Gliese 581g is even real yet its still unconfirmed its existence.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23626
13. cyclonebuster
5:46 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting CybrTeddy:


You'll have to also increase the rotation of the moon to near 24 hours for any plant life to survive. You'll have to get it a magnetic sphere to protect it from radiation from the soon, which means you'll have to increase the core temperature of the moon.


It would get a chance to survive where the shines and where it becomes dark like on gliese 581g.

Link
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
12. CybrTeddy
5:12 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting BoudreauxThibodeaux:
wat


You forgot the 'h'.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23626
10. CybrTeddy
5:06 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting BoudreauxThibodeaux:
Take that apostrophe out of the word "mean's".
You don't use apostrophes in non-possessive plural words.


Okay Grammar Nazi.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23626
8. CybrTeddy
5:03 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting cyclonebuster:


Shoot them onto the surface where they rupture and it leaks out that way it should stay near the surface.


You'll have to also increase the rotation of the moon to near 24 hours for any plant life to survive. You'll have to get it a magnetic sphere to protect it from radiation from the soon, which means you'll have to increase the core temperature of the moon.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23626
6. cyclonebuster
5:01 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting cyclonebuster:


Shoot them onto the surface where they rupture and it leaks out that way it should stay near the surface.


Then we can give the soil nutrients plants some seeds grow some trees make some oxygen.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
5. cyclonebuster
4:59 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Quoting CybrTeddy:
Terraforming the moon is not possible with current technology as you'd have to pump to much C02 into the lunar orbit to first create an atmosphere. THEN you have to add to the atmosphere with C02 gases and then you also have to remember.. atmospheres aren't entirely made up of C02. Not possible at all now adays. Take thousands of years. Atleast Mars has an atmosphere which is why its considered a prime terraforming target. Take Io for example, that has been pumping out volcanic gas for thousands of years and it still only has a faint atmosphere.


Shoot them onto the surface where they rupture and it leaks out that way it should stay near the surface.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396
3. CybrTeddy
4:48 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
Terraforming the moon is not possible with current technology as you'd have to pump to much C02 into the lunar orbit to first create an atmosphere. THEN you have to add to the atmosphere with C02 gases and then you also have to remember.. atmospheres aren't entirely made up of C02. Not possible at all now adays. Take thousands of years. Atleast Mars has an atmosphere which is why its considered a prime terraforming target. Take Io for example, that has been pumping out volcanic gas for thousands of years and it still only has a faint atmosphere.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23626
1. cyclonebuster
4:34 PM GMT on December 18, 2010
img src="">
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20396

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