Mid of Germany

Storms in Germany June 20th

By: barbamz, 4:34 PM GMT on June 21, 2013


This is a very (!) impressive video of the kind of weather which we had yesterday in parts of Germany. Video was taken in Bavaria (Straubing)

I just had a phone call to my parents, living 45 miles away from my place in southern Hassia. They've experienced a very frightening and very sudden sort of weather explosion yesterday night, downing trees and flooding the basement. Though I gave them a general warning earlier I couldn't warn them of this particular cell because it - as I saw in real time on radar - developed from one moment to the other right over their heads. My mother says she saw a lot of little watersprouds dancing on the flooded street in front of their house during this downburst. She never saw anything like this and she was shaking from fear. - Today my brother in law was busy with his chain saws to clean up the damage in their garden.


This video was taken ca. 55 miles south of my place at Mannheim. Parts of this storm system reached my city Mainz an hour later. A member of a german weather blog managed it to take an impressive photo though it already was quite dark.

Severe thunderstorms have crossed Germany yesterday night, but sparing my city Mainz, only sending some heavy wind gusts and some rains. At other places damage was much worse, but weather is calming down now.

Summarizing reports with a beautiful photo gallery (nice pics of lightnings!) on Spiegel English:

Lightning, Floods, Debris: Thunderstorms Hammer Germany

EuroNews video has some dramatic impressions from Switzerland and France:

Heavy rains continue devastation in Switzerland and France
21/06 00:05 CET

BBC weather video (from yesterday) explains what happened: What a scorcher...

Updated: 6:06 PM GMT on June 21, 2013

Permalink

Walk with me around the volcano lake

By: barbamz, 5:36 PM GMT on June 02, 2013

"Eifel" is the Yellowstone Park of Germany. Volcanic activity is dormant now, but the last eruption happened only 10.000 years ago. Especially beautiful are the so called "maars", a specific sort of crater lake:

Quoting wikipedia:
"A maar is a broad, low-relief volcanic crater that is caused by a phreatomagmatic eruption, which is an explosion caused by groundwater coming into contact with hot lava or magma. A maar characteristically fills with water to form a relatively shallow crater lake. The name comes from the local Moselle Franconian dialect of Daun, where it is in turn derived from Latin mare (sea). Maars are shallow, flat-floored craters that scientists interpret as having formed above diatremes as a result of a violent expansion of magmatic gas or steam; deep erosion of a maar presumably would expose a diatreme. Maars range in size from 60 to 8,000 m (200 to 26,000 ft) across and from 10 to 200 m (33 to 660 ft) deep, and most are commonly filled with water to form natural lakes. Most maars have low rims composed of a mixture of loose fragments of volcanic rocks and rocks torn from the walls of the diatreme."

Below some pictures I took this weekend (May 30th to June 2nd, 2013) walking around the three maars near Schalkenmehren and Daun. There are a lot of beautiful views from the rims of those old craters.


The whole picture: Schalkenmehren and it's lake with the yellow of broom in the foreground.


Our favourite hiking trail around the lake of Schalkenmehren: Changing views at every corner.


Old apples and jung blossoms: Lawns with fruit trees down to the Maar of Schalkenmehren/Eifel/Germany.


Sunspot at the shore of the maar of Schalkenmehren.


There are three lakes in a row near the town of Daun/Eifel. This is a view down to the "Gemuendener Maar".





Old framework building in the village of Schalkenmehren at the shore of it's own "maar"

Updated: 8:05 PM GMT on June 06, 2013

Permalink

About barbamz

I'm Barbara in Germany (Mainz), and I'm interested in weather already for decades.