Okie Global Warming Fact of the Day

Truthout Doing better on Global warming /Arctic reporting

By: arcticmelt, 4:51 PM GMT on March 31, 2014

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/22790-the-vanish ing-arctic-ice-cap

An Arctic largely devoid of ice, giant methane outbursts causing tsunamis in the North Atlantic, and global sea levels rising by several meters by mid-century sound like the stuff of science fiction.

But to a growing number of scientists studying Anthropogenic Climate Disruption (ACD/climate change), these dramatic predictions are very real possibilities in our not-so-distant future, thanks to the vanishing Arctic ice cap, which is continuing its rapid decrease in both volume and area.
"The polar bear is us." - Patricia Romero Lankao, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Arctic sea ice researchers are predicting that sea ice will no longer last through summers in the next couple of years, and even US Navy researchers have predicted an ice-free Arctic by 2016. Whichever year the phenomenon begins, it will be the first time humans have existed on Earth without year-round sea ice in the Arctic, and scientists warn that this is when "abrupt climate change" passes the point of no return.

Updated: 4:54 PM GMT on March 31, 2014

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Arctic ice record low for Feb

By: arcticmelt, 4:49 PM GMT on March 31, 2014

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/arctic-sea-ice-s its-at-record-low-for-mid-february-17093

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New study shows major increase in West Antarctic glacial loss

By: arcticmelt, 12:17 PM GMT on March 29, 2014

http://phys.org/news/2014-03-major-west-antarctic-g lacial-loss.html

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Paul Beckwith and Arcticmelt/cold weather connection

By: arcticmelt, 9:17 PM GMT on March 25, 2014

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nI4iC7k7OTE&feature =youtu.be

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Arctic Sea ice Breakuing up Faster

By: arcticmelt, 7:48 PM GMT on March 25, 2014

robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/03/24/arctic-sea -ice-breaking-up-as-heat-anomaly-spikes-to-4-21-de grees-celsius-above-average/

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Melting Greenland

By: arcticmelt, 1:10 PM GMT on March 19, 2014

Above, Peter Sinclair's interview from last summer with Dr. Alun Hubbard in Kangerlussuaq. Hubbard described how a GPS device deep in the ice sheet’s interior was beginning to show significant movement.
Newly published evidence continues the story.

Nature Climate Change:

Abstract: .. Here, we show that the northeast Greenland ice stream, which extends more than 600 km into the interior of the ice sheet, is now undergoing sustained dynamic thinning, linked to regional warming, after more than a quarter of a century of stability. This sector of the Greenland ice sheet is of particular interest, because the drainage basin area covers 16% of the ice sheet (twice that of Jakobshavn Isbræ) and numerical model predictions suggest no significant mass loss for this sector, leading to an under-estimation of future global sea-level rise. The geometry of the bedrock and monotonic trend in glacier speed-up and mass loss suggests that dynamic drawdown of ice in this region will continue in the near future.

Kitasap Sun/AP:

Stability in the rapidly changing Arctic is a rarity. Yet for years researchers believed the glaciers in the frigid northeast section of Greenland, which connect to the interior of the country’s massive ice sheet, were resilient to the effects of climate change that have affected so much of the Arctic.

But new data published Sunday in Nature Climate Change reveals that over the past decade, the region has started rapidly losing ice due to a rise in air and ocean temperatures caused in part by climate change. The increased melt raises grave concerns that sea level rise could accelerate even faster than projected, threatening even more coastal communities worldwide.

“North Greenland is very cold and dry, and believed to be a very stable area,” said Shfaqat Khan, a senior researcher at the Technical University of Denmark who led the new study. “It is surprisingly to see ice loss in one of the coldest regions on the planet.”

The stability of the region is particularly important because it has much deeper ties to the interior ice sheet than other glaciers on the island. If the entire ice sheet were to melt which would take thousands of years in most climate change scenarios sea levels would rise up to 23 feet, catastrophically altering coastlines around the world.

Sea levels have risen 8 inches globally since the start of the 1900s, and current projections show that figure could rise another 3 feet by the end of this century.

Some recent research has suggested that Greenland’s ice loss may slow, but not all researchers agree. Jason Box, a glaciologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, said the new study presented a novel analysis of the region and that other factors such as soot could contribute to even more rapid melt in Greenland and other parts of the Arctic.

“These new measurements show that the sleeping giant is awakening and suggest given likely continued Arctic warming that it’s not going back to bed,” Box said in an email.

Greenland houses 680,000 cubic miles of ice in its ice sheet, which stretches up to 3 miles thick in some places and covers roughly three-quarters of the island. Glaciers stretch from this frozen mass in all directions, eventually meeting the sea. In the past 20 years, some of these glaciers, particularly in the southeast and northwest, have dumped ever increasing amounts of ice into the ocean. That water has accounted for more than 15 percent of global sea level rise over that period.

Since the mid-1960s, climate change has helped drive average air temperatures up about 3.6F across the Arctic, more than double the increase compared to midlatitudes. The rise in air temperatures has fueled a tumultuous decline in sea ice, which has also helped warm the region’s ocean waters. Around parts of Greenland, ocean surface temperatures rose 1.8-3.6F between 1990-2011.

While the northwest and southeast section of Greenland have dramatically lost ice, researchers believed the northeast section was holding its ground. From 1978-2003, that was true, but ice loss has accelerated rapidly since mid-2003.

The Zachariae glacier has long acted as a sentinel on the northeast coast of the island, keeping ocean waters at bay from a 370-mile long stream of ice that stretches into the heart of Greenland’s massive ice sheet.

But a series of unusually warm summers around 2003 started to trigger glacial melt. At the same time, a spike in ocean surface temperatures also helped melt sea ice that normally acts as a buttress for the Zachariae and other glaciers in northeast Greenland. Without reinforcement, the glaciers suddenly started to draw down more ice from on high and retreat faster.

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Melting Greenland

By: arcticmelt, 12:47 PM GMT on March 19, 2014

From Climate Crocks Peter Sinclair:Above, Sinclair's interview from last summer with Dr. Alun Hubbard in Kangerlussuaq. Hubbard described how a GPS device deep in the ice sheet’s interior was beginning to show significant movement.
Newly published evidence continues the story.

Nature Climate Change:

Abstract: .. Here, we show that the northeast Greenland ice stream, which extends more than 600 km into the interior of the ice sheet, is now undergoing sustained dynamic thinning, linked to regional warming, after more than a quarter of a century of stability. This sector of the Greenland ice sheet is of particular interest, because the drainage basin area covers 16% of the ice sheet (twice that of Jakobshavn Isbræ) and numerical model predictions suggest no significant mass loss for this sector, leading to an under-estimation of future global sea-level rise. The geometry of the bedrock and monotonic trend in glacier speed-up and mass loss suggests that dynamic drawdown of ice in this region will continue in the near future.

Kitasap Sun/AP:

Stability in the rapidly changing Arctic is a rarity. Yet for years researchers believed the glaciers in the frigid northeast section of Greenland, which connect to the interior of the country’s massive ice sheet, were resilient to the effects of climate change that have affected so much of the Arctic.

But new data published Sunday in Nature Climate Change reveals that over the past decade, the region has started rapidly losing ice due to a rise in air and ocean temperatures caused in part by climate change. The increased melt raises grave concerns that sea level rise could accelerate even faster than projected, threatening even more coastal communities worldwide.

“North Greenland is very cold and dry, and believed to be a very stable area,” said Shfaqat Khan, a senior researcher at the Technical University of Denmark who led the new study. “It is surprisingly to see ice loss in one of the coldest regions on the planet.”

The stability of the region is particularly important because it has much deeper ties to the interior ice sheet than other glaciers on the island. If the entire ice sheet were to melt which would take thousands of years in most climate change scenarios sea levels would rise up to 23 feet, catastrophically altering coastlines around the world.

Sea levels have risen 8 inches globally since the start of the 1900s, and current projections show that figure could rise another 3 feet by the end of this century.

Some recent research has suggested that Greenland’s ice loss may slow, but not all researchers agree. Jason Box, a glaciologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, said the new study presented a novel analysis of the region and that other factors such as soot could contribute to even more rapid melt in Greenland and other parts of the Arctic.

“These new measurements show that the sleeping giant is awakening and suggest given likely continued Arctic warming that it’s not going back to bed,” Box said in an email.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by greenman3610
Filed in Crock of the Week

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Yale.warm river water melts Arctic ice

By: arcticmelt, 1:46 PM GMT on March 12, 2014

http://e360.yale.edu/digest/warm_river_water_plays_ major_role_in_arctic_sea_ice_melt_study_finds/4093 / e360 digest

06 Mar 2014: Warm River Water Plays Major
Role in Arctic Sea Ice Melt, Study Finds

Click to Enlarge
Arctic river water
NASA
Warm river water entering Arctic Ocean
Relatively warm water flowing into the Arctic Ocean from rivers contributes significantly to Arctic sea ice melt each summer, a phenomenon that will intensify as the region warms, according to NASA researchers. The river discharge not only melts coastal sea ice, it also has a wider climate impact as it creates more open water, which is darker than ice and absorbs more heat from sunlight. As these NASA images show, when water from Canada's Mackenzie River flowed into the Beaufort Sea in the summer of 2012, average surface temperature of the open water rose by 6.5 degrees C (11.7 degrees F) after the pulse of river water. Flow from the Mackenzie raised sea surface temperatures as far as 350 kilometers (217 miles) from the coast. "These watersheds undergo continental warming in summertime, unleashing an enormous amount of energy into the Arctic Ocean,"

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Record low Arctic Sea ice for this time of year..Oh,Oh

By: arcticmelt, 12:50 PM GMT on March 12, 2014

http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2014/03/has-the-des cent-begun.html
The situation is dire, given that methane concentrations have risen strongly following an earthquake that hit the Gakkel Ridge on March 6, 2014, as illustrated by the image below.CLICK TO SEE and El Nino coming possibly..Oh Oh

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Methane-producing microbe blooms in permafrost thaw

By: arcticmelt, 9:47 PM GMT on March 10, 2014

http://phys.org/news/2014-03-methane-producing-micr obe-blooms-permafrost.html#jCp In time with the climate warming up, parts of the permafrost in northern Sweden and elsewhere in the world are thawing. An international study published in Nature Communications describes a newly discovered microbe found in the thawing permafrost of a mire in northernmost Sweden. There it flourishes and produces large amounts of greenhouse gases.

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Study:Arctic Amplifying Feedbacks much worse than thought

By: arcticmelt, 6:45 PM GMT on March 08, 2014

http://robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/02/20/amp lifying-feedbacks-and-the-arctic-heat-scream-study -finds-polar-albedo-falling-at-twice-expected-rate -added-heat-equal-to-25-of-co2-forcing/
Amplifying Feedbacks and the Arctic Heat Scream: Study Finds Polar Albedo Falling at Twice Expected Rate, Added Heat Equal to 25% CO2 Forcing Globally, 4 Times Human Forcing Locally

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Calif drought,Arcticmelt &Jet Stream

By: arcticmelt, 3:39 PM GMT on March 08, 2014

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/03/07/3370481 /california-drought/ Climatologist Who Predicted California Drought 10 Years Ago Says It May Soon Be ‘Even More Dire’

By Joe Romm on March 7, 2014 at 12:26 pm:
In general, most climate scientists say that — severe drought is much more than just a reduction in precipitation. After a political scientist unjustifiably labeled his mainstream views “zombie science,” the President’s Science Advisor, Dr. John P. Holdren, explained in an extended debunking how climate change worsens Western droughts even if it doesn’t reduce precipitation (see here and below).

First, though, as Joe Romm reported, scientists a decade ago not only predicted the loss of Arctic ice would dry out California, they also precisely predicted the specific, unprecedented change in the jet stream that has in fact caused the unprecedented nature of the California drought. Study co-author, Prof. Lisa Sloan, told me last week that, “I think the actual situation in the next few decades could be even more dire that our study suggested.”

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Methane Clathrates/Arctic

By: arcticmelt, 9:09 PM GMT on March 06, 2014

http://arctic-news.blogspot.co.nz/2014/03/presentat ion-by-guy-mcpherson.html

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Ongoing Arctic Amplification

By: arcticmelt, 9:30 PM GMT on March 05, 2014

http://robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/03/05/sea -ice-loss-human-warming-places-earth-under-ongoing -fire-of-severe-weather-events-through-early-2014- likelihood-of-extremes-for-some-regions-increases- by-500/#comment-9111

Sea Ice Loss, Human Warming Places Earth Under Ongoing Fire of Severe Weather Events Through Early 2014, Likelihood of Extremes For Some Regions Increases by 500%

Heat overburden at the roof of our world. It’s a dangerous signal that the first, worst effects of human-caused climate change are starting to ramp up. And it’s a signal we are receiving now. A strong message coinciding with a world-wide barrage of some of the worst January and February weather extremes ever experienced in human reckoning.

An Ongoing Arctic Heat Amplification

Ever since December, the Arctic has been experiencing what could well be called a heat wave during winter-time. Average temperatures have ranged between 2 and 7 degrees Celsius above normal winter time readings (1979-2000) over the entire Arctic basin. Local readings frequently exceed 20 degrees Celsius above average over large zones that shift and swell, circulating in a great cloud of abnormal warmth around the roof of the world.

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NYT Revkin Abrupt Climate Change

By: arcticmelt, 1:39 PM GMT on March 03, 2014

http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/03/an-upd ate-on-risks-of-abrupt-jolts-from-global-warming/? _php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

Dot Earth - New York Times blog
Climate Change December 3, 2013, 11:00 am
An Update on Risks of Abrupt Jolts from Global Warming
By ANDREW C. REVKIN

In 2002, the National Academy of Sciences published “Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises,” a valuable report examining whether and how the building human influence on the climate system might lead to disruptive jolts. The most important finding, in a way, was that this was an area sorely in need of intensified research.

Most of the “monsters behind the door,” to use an apt phrase from Stephen W. Pacala of Princeton, were plausible rather than probable. There were signs they’d escaped before (evidence of past abrupt changes), but only faint scratching could be heard now.

Now there’s a new report from the Academy’s National Research Council. The title reflects advances in understanding: “Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.” The findings laid out below reinforce the reality that the biggest impacts of greenhouse-driven global warming still lie several generations in the future.

Given humanity’s focus on the near and now, the greatest challenge posed by global warming is figuring out how to spur meaningful changes in energy norms based on a risk with this time scale.

With that in mind, the new report also looks at abrupt change in societies as well as the climate system. Read more on that below from one of the authors.

This excerpt from a summary nicely summarizes the basic findings:

Abrupt change is already underway in some systems [summer Arctic sea ice and extinction rates], and large scientific uncertainties about the likelihood of other abrupt changes highlight the need for further research. However, with recent advances in understanding of the climate system, some potential abrupt changes once thought to be imminent threats are now considered unlikely to occur this century

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Abrupt Climate Change Now???

By: arcticmelt, 9:17 PM GMT on March 02, 2014

http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/comm entators/2272758/we_must_prevent_abrupt_climate_ch ange.html
Some say we are in abrupt Climate Change..who can argue things have changed not dramatically???How can we loose 75 % by volume of Arctic Ice in the past 30 years and not end up w dire events???

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Methane Mantle.Light

By: arcticmelt, 7:18 PM GMT on March 01, 2014

http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2014/02/mantle-meth ane.html

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Arctic/Jet stream Climate Crock of the week chimes in

By: arcticmelt, 5:32 PM GMT on March 01, 2014

http://climatecrocks.com/2014/03/01/the-weekend-won k-arctic-icejetstream-the-real-climate-debate/comm ent-page-1/#comment-51127

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About arcticmelt

Care about discussion of how to slow the dire effects of human caused Global Warming.Okla media no help/part of the problem