Winter Storm Athena moves into Northeast

By: Angela Fritz , 9:09 PM GMT on November 07, 2012

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Powerful Winter Storm Athena moved up the eastern seaboard Wednesday, with its center a few hundred miles east of the New Jersey coast by the mid-afternoon. Winter Weather Advisories are posted from northeast Maryland through Maine in anticipation of several inches of snow by the time the storm exits the area. Coastal flood warnings and wind advisories are also posted for the same areas that were hit by Sandy last week.


Severe Weather Alerts for Winter Storm Athena

Athena is bringing a variety of intense weather conditions to the coast from Maryland through Massachusetts:

Wind

Athena has strengthened considerably over the past few days as it utilized the warm waters of the Gulf Stream to deepen significantly. This, in turn, has created very power winds for the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

Some notable wind gusts are:

67 mph near Cuttyhunk, MA
60 mph near Dunn Landing, NY
62 mph near Vineyard Haven, MA
54 mph near Fairhaven, MA
54 mph near Cut Bank, MA
51 mph near Plum Island, NY
50 mph East Falmouth, MA

Elevated Water Levels

Because of the intense winds blowing water toward the coast, water levels have been elevated beyond normal from New Hampshire through Virginia. Some notable water levels ABOVE NORMAL at 3:40 pm ET. include:

2.5 feet at Battery Park, NY
2.5 feet at Atlantic City, NJ
2.1 feet at Kings Point, NY
2 feet at Quonset Point, RI
2.7 feet at Bergen Point West Reach, NY

IMPORTANT NOTE: We have installed a live storm surge layer on the WunderMap so you can track the elevated water levels as they happen. You can find that here.

Rain and Snow

Since Athena is a nor'easter-type storm, it is pulling cold air southward into the Northeast. Afternoon temperatures from Maine through northern Pennsylvania and New Jersey were in the 30s. This cold air produced areas of heavy snow, with the heaviest snowfall reported in Connecticut. Snowfall reports ending 2:40 PM ET:

4.5" at Clintonville, CT
3.5" at Brookfield, CT
3.0" at Monroe, CT
3.0" at New Fairfield, CT
3.0" at Ridgefield, CT
3.0" at North Brandford, CT

Weather Underground has a number of webcams in Connecticut that are recording the snow as it happens. Take a look here.

Here are a few webcam shots of note.








Rain is also falling from Delaware through Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts. A few weather stations in southern New Jersey have reported over 1 inch of rain thus far, while numerous weather stations from New Jersey through Long Island have tallied over a half inch of rain thus far.

The official HPC precipitation forecast is calling for over an inch of precipitation as far north as eastern Maine.

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4. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
3:42 AM GMT on November 08, 2012
angelafritz has created a new entry.
3. vis0
11:47 PM GMT on November 07, 2012
REPOST from my crappy blog)

FIRST as to naming WINTER or better described NON TROPICAL storms since
we are not in winter. i think its a good idea, BUT NOT (feminine or
feminine mythical) NAMES.  NAMES are for warm core/Tropical storms.
(explain below using ancient type thinking that might offend some as to
the gender explanation but understand its used as a way of explains
science as ancients used feminine & masculine parables to explain
the body's to universes inner workings.



Cold core storms or storms that FIRST BEGIN as cold core should receive
either only numbers with its descriptive title as SuperStorm 01 of 2012,
Super Storm 02 of 2013, Super Storm 03 of 2013 etc or  a masculine type
title i.e. military numbering yet using laymen terms using Greek
lettering AND THE FIRST GREEK ALPHA NUMBER should be 3 LETTERS after the
last used by Tropical storms in that year in case any late tropical
activity occurs.  Tony last used letter T name as to Tropical formations
therefore the next lettered name would begin with V, W, Alpha,  (Q, U,
X, Y, and Z not used)  Therefore if one uses the example i/others share,
Athena should be "2012/13 October Beta" or "2012/13 Atlantic Beta"
instead of Athena or MASCULINE alphabetical Greek mythology names
instead of Athena





The reason for an ancient train of thought is cold core represent the
Male i.e. more cold heart-ed (ITS NATURE/HER RULES, i'm only a "gopher")
and we use the last name as its ID as its western culture and other
cultures were usually the male name that is last (sir name) therefore IF
A TROPICAL BETA FORMED this year it would be TS BETA (FIRST AND ONLY
NAME IS BETA = feminine)while the cold core version would be the 
"2012/13 October Beta" (THE SIR NAME/LAST NAME is BETA.



These are just example i leave it to the pros to hash it out (TALK,
SHARE IDEAS) just THINK SERIOUSLY as John Hope  (May goodness bring
peace to his soul, one of a handful of people i look up to) I THINK
would of ,peace
Member Since: December 15, 2006 Posts: 247 Comments: 422
2. vis0
10:51 PM GMT on November 07, 2012
One worry that i have not heard of, is ifn salt is used this might add corrosion to areas where underground wires were safe i.e. being covered by several feet of earth/soil. Now the salt will be "more concentrated" as it reaches the wires. Hopefully rain will lower the salt concentration. If one wants more info/updates on what i call the ml-d please read my blog at weatherunderground, but always come back to the PROS as here at Angela's or at Dr. Jeff Masters as they;ll have the best up2date info & help.
Member Since: December 15, 2006 Posts: 247 Comments: 422

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About angelafritz

Atmospheric Scientist here at Weather Underground, with serious nerd love for tropical cyclones and climate change. Twitter: @WunderAngela

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