Sandy: State by state impact forecasts

By: Angela Fritz , 11:43 PM GMT on October 28, 2012

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We're seeing impacts as far west as Ohio on Monday evening. Wind gusts of 64 miles per hour have been reported in Cleveland, Ohio, where the winds have also brought down trees on to power lines. Widespread power outages have been reported from the Northeast to Ohio and south to North Carolina.

For local storm warnings and advisories, check out the "Severe Weather" layer on Wundermap. Click your location to see the advisories in effect.

Maine

• Storm tide and surge: 1 to 2 feet of storm surge on top of tides.
Wind: 30 to 40 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 1 to 3 inches, with isolated amounts up to 5 inches
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday.
• Power outages: Spotty power outages are possible as wind takes down branches and trees.

Vermont/New Hampshire

Wind: 30 to 40 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. Gusts to 70 mph on exposed slopes and higher elevations. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening.
Rain: Widespread totals from 1 to 3 inches, with isolated amounts up to 5 inches
Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday.
Power outages: Spotty power outages are possible as wind takes down branches and trees.

Massachusetts

• Storm tide and surge: Up to 4 feet of storm surge on top of tides, with a 10-20% chance of surge exceeding 5 feet.

Storm tide forecast for Buzzards Bay, MA is 7-8 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Woods Hole, MA is 6-7 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Nantucket, MA is 6-7 feet.

Wind: Gusts up to 40 mph are still possible into Tuesday.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 1.5 to 3 inches, with isolated amounts up to 5 inches
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday.
• Power outages: Spotty power outages are possible as wind takes down branches and trees

Rhode Island

• Storm tide and surge: 4 to 5 feet of surge is possible on top of tides, with a 10-20% chance of surge exceeding 5 feet.

Storm tide forecast for Newport, RI is 8-9 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Providence, RI is 10-11 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Block Island, RI is 7-8 feet.

Wind: 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening
• Rain: Widespread totals from 1.5 to 3 inches, with isolated amounts up to 5 inches
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday.
• Power outages: Spotty power outages are possible as wind takes down branches and trees

Connecticut

• Storm tide and surge: 6 to 9 feet of surge is possible on top of tides, with a 60% chance of surge exceeding 5 feet west of Bridgeport. Surge will be worse as you move west along the Connecticut coastline.

Storm tide forecast for New London, CT is 8-9 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Bridgeport, CT is 14-15 feet.

Wind: 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening
• Rain: Widespread totals from 1.5 to 3 inches, with isolated amounts up to 5 inches
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday.
• Power outages: Power outages are possible as wind takes down branches and trees

New York

• Storm tide and surge:
Long Island Sound -- 6-7 feet on top of tide with a 50% chance of exceeding 7 feet. Storm tide forecast for Port Jefferson is 13-14 feet.
Manhattan -- 4-5 feet on top of tide with a 40% chance of exceeding 7 feet.
Staten Island -- 4-5 feet on top of tide with a 60% chance of exceeding 7 feet.

Storm tide forecast for Montauk, NY is 7-8 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Port Jefferson, NY is 13-14 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Kings Point, NY is 12-13 feet.
Storm tide forecast for The Battery, NY is 9-10 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Bergen Pt, NY is 10-11 feet.

Wind: Long duration, damaging winds expected. 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 80 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and night.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 2 to 4 inches, with isolated amounts up to 6 inches, especially in the higher elevations. 1 to 2 inches PER HOUR are expected where the heaviest rain bands set up.
• Inland Flooding: Widespread urban flooding is expected Monday and into Tuesday. Fast-responding streams are expected to flood, as well. The flooding will be exacerbated by blockages in storm drains as well as rising storm tide.
• Power outages: Power outages are possible, even likely, as wind takes down branches and trees.

Pennsylvania

• Storm tide and surge: 1 to 2 feet of surge is possible on top of tides, with a 30-40% chance of surge exceeding 3 feet.

Storm tide forecast for Philadelphia, PA is 8-9 feet.

Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 70 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 4 to 10 inches, with the highest amounts mainly from Philadelphia metro southward. Heavy rain is expected to begin Sunday night, with the heaviest occurring Monday night into Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday. RIver flooding is possible.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind takes down branches and trees.

West Virginia

Wind: 30 to 40 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday.
Rain: Rainfall up to 4 inches though Tuesday.
Inland Flooding: Significant small stream flooding is possible.
Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind and snow takes down branches and trees.
Snow: Blizzard warnings are in effect for the mountain regions of the state, where up to 3 feet of snow could fall in the highest elevations.

New Jersey

• Storm tide and surge: 4 to 5 feet of surge is possible on top of tides, with a 30-50% chance of surge exceeding 7 feet. Surge will be worse as you move north along the New Jersey coastline.

Storm tide forecast for Sandy Hook, NJ is 10-11 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Atlantic City, NJ is 9-10 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Cape May, NJ is 9-10 feet.

Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 70 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 4 to 10 inches. Heavy rain is expected to begin Sunday night, with the heaviest occurring Monday night into Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday. RIver flooding is possible.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind takes down branches and trees.

Delaware

• Storm tide and surge: 4 to 5 feet of surge is possible on top of tides, with a 20% chance of surge exceeding 6 feet.

Storm tide forecast for Reedy Point, DE is 8-9 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Lewes, DE is 9-10 feet.

Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 70 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 4 to 10 inches. Heavy rain is expected to begin Sunday night, with the heaviest occurring Monday night into Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Significant urban and small stream flooding is possible, which could linger into Tuesday. RIver flooding is possible.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind takes down branches and trees.

Maryland and Washington D.C.

• Storm tide and surge: 4 to 5 feet of surge is possible on top of tides on the ocean coast, with a 10-20% chance of surge exceeding 6 feet.
Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast, and will also be stronger along the ridges.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 3 to 6 inches, with locally higher amounts, especially in the D.C. metro. Heavy rain is expected to begin Sunday night, with the heaviest occurring Monday night into Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Moderate to major flooding is possible on the smaller creeks and streams. Flooding is also possible on the larger mainstream rivers beyond Tuesday.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind takes down branches and trees.
Snow: Blizzard warnings are in effect for the western mountain region of the state, where up to 3 feet of snow could fall in the highest elevations.

Virginia

• Storm tide and surge: 2 to 4 feet of surge is possible on top of tides on the ocean coast.

Storm tide forecast for Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, VA is 6-7 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Wachapreague, VA is 7-8 feet.
Storm tide forecast for Kiptopeke Beach, VA is 6-7 feet.

Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast, and will also be stronger along the ridges.
• Rain: Widespread totals from 3 to 6 inches, with locally higher amounts, especially in the D.C. metro. Heavy rain is expected to begin Sunday night, with the heaviest occurring Monday night into Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Moderate to major flooding is possible on the smaller creeks and streams. Flooding is also possible on the larger mainstream rivers beyond Tuesday.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind takes down branches and trees.

North Carolina

• Storm tide and surge: 2 to 4 feet of surge is possible on top of tides.

Storm tide forecast for Duck Pier, NC is 7-8 feet.

Wind: 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday. Wind speeds will increase closer to the coast, and will also be stronger along the ridges.
• Rain: An additional 1 to 3 inches possible overnight Sunday.
• Inland Flooding: Flood threat is tapering off as Sandy moves north.
• Power outages: Sporadic power outages are possible as wind breaks branches off trees.



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66. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
6:32 PM GMT on October 30, 2012
angelafritz has created a new entry.
65. shaunlevi
3:15 PM GMT on October 30, 2012
Really appreciate the great coverage provided throughout the storm.
Member Since: October 30, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
64. SandyCheeks13
3:29 AM GMT on October 30, 2012
Hey, I was wondering, will the flooding going as far as into East Elmhurst and Jackson Heights in Queens? I really need this question answered. :<
Member Since: October 30, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 7
63. nosambor
12:33 AM GMT on October 30, 2012
Angela,
Thank you for your FREE service to the world. Don't let the malcontents bother you. You folks are doing a wunderful job.
Rob
Member Since: February 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1
62. sailmonger
10:43 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting Sallmander:
Angela

West Virginia is a state, is in the hurricane area and is being heavily impacted. According to you blobs we do not exist. What shoddy "reporting"



West Virginia

• Wind: 30 to 40 mph with gusts up to 60 mph. The strongest winds will occur Monday afternoon and evening and into Tuesday.
• Rain: Rainfall up to 4 inches though Tuesday.
• Inland Flooding: Significant small stream flooding is possible.
• Power outages: Power outages are likely as wind and snow takes down branches and trees.
• Snow: Blizzard warnings are in effect for the mountain regions of the state, where up to 3 feet of snow could fall in the highest elevations.
Member Since: September 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
61. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
9:38 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting jsmarkley:
Angela,

What kind of effect is Sandy going to have on Buffalo, NY? Looks like it's going to be a tropical depression by the time it hits.

I commute by bicycle, only 3 miles, but wondering if the wind is going to be big enough factor that I should take the bus.


I would take the bus, if only because of the rain!
60. jsmarkley
9:19 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Angela,

What kind of effect is Sandy going to have on Buffalo, NY? Looks like it's going to be a tropical depression by the time it hits.

I commute by bicycle, only 3 miles, but wondering if the wind is going to be big enough factor that I should take the bus.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
59. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
8:38 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting masmith0512:
Ms. Fritz,
You and your staff are doing just fine. I am certain the weather underground, as well as all other news outlets are doing all you can. As a truck driver, I depend alot on the information you provide, and just wanted you to know.. I appreciate what you do for all of us.



Stay safe out there!
58. ANetTow
8:29 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Look again. West Virginia is listed between Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Quoting Sallmander:
Angela

West Virginia is a state, is in the hurricane area and is being heavily impacted. According to you blobs we do not exist. What shoddy "reporting"
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
57. masmith0512
8:28 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Ms. Fritz,
You and your staff are doing just fine. I am certain the weather underground, as well as all other news outlets are doing all you can. As a truck driver, I depend alot on the information you provide, and just wanted you to know.. I appreciate what you do for all of us.

Quoting angelafritz:


Im sorry you feel this way. Given all that's going on, we chose to focus on what will likely be the hardest-hit states with the most life-threatening impacts. I will add a West Virginia outlook for you, which will include snow -- a very interesting result of this storm.
Member Since: October 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
56. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
8:17 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting Sallmander:
Angela

West Virginia is a state, is in the hurricane area and is being heavily impacted. According to you blobs we do not exist. What shoddy "reporting"


Im sorry you feel this way. Given all that's going on, we chose to focus on what will likely be the hardest-hit states with the most life-threatening impacts. I will add a West Virginia outlook for you, which will include snow -- a very interesting result of this storm.
55. Jetson78
5:53 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Thanks for the West Virginia report. I am keeping tabs on my parents there.

So far just a little snow on the rooftops and grass in So. WV.

Drew
Member Since: February 16, 2003 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
54. kellya2mi
5:13 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
We're seeing some high winds here in SE Michigan too. Not shocking when you see the size of this thing!
Member Since: June 24, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
53. Sallmander
4:58 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Angela

West Virginia is a state, is in the hurricane area and is being heavily impacted. According to you blobs we do not exist. What shoddy "reporting"
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
52. sunmoon
4:51 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Great presentation of the impacts of the storm,thank you for that.
Member Since: May 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
51. Izzn
4:46 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Nicely done! Hoping you can add something about OHIO soon, we are getting kind of breezy here and the entire Northeast part of the state is one giant mud pit already. Keep up the good work and thank you for this info!
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
50. Nrf2Baby
3:19 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
My brother is in Vermont....Can you provide a state update for Vermont please?

Thanks and prayers are being sent for everyone in the area!

Babs
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
49. vermonner
2:50 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Thank you for being rational and laying down the science end of things. I am here because of the Jim Cantore's of the world . I can't take the hyperbole much longer. I stopped watching any televised coverage yesterday when I heard the words "11 foot wall of water"....
Member Since: February 2, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
48. Trotman
2:45 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
We're in Chesapeake, VA, some 30 miles from the Atlantic Coast of Virginia Beach. So far, so good, lots of rain, some wind gusts, but the power is still on! Glad that ol' Sandy is sliding by. Thoughts and prayers for all in the path up North! Hang in there everyone, sunnier days are ahead . . .
Member Since: February 4, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
47. Gurney1
2:39 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Your info is great but New Hampshire,where I have family, has been left out.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
46. Lou24
2:35 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Whenever there is bad weather, there is so much information out there. I have learned over time that you guys are the very best, most accurate and most reliable source of information that there is. Please keep up the great work and thank you.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
45. PHILnVA
1:53 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Great information... I moved to the Virginia area about 18 months ago from the central east coast of Florida. During the hurricane seasons there I always relied on WU for the most up to date and user friendly information. I thought I left all this hurricane stuff in Florida. After being hit with 3 hurricanes in 2004 back to back, I am done breathing the hurricane dust... Stay safe everyone...
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
44. weatherdanzer
1:51 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting angelafritz:
Maine impacts are listed at the top of this blog.


Thanks!
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1
43. Toripony
12:28 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting Chazman1944:
I have friends that just moved to White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. Are they still predicting huge amounts of snow there?

Chad, I'be been monitoring my hometown area there; they are now under a blizzard warning. However, most of that will occur above 2500 feet which is just a little above WSS. My life experience there is that your friends will suffer high winds and power outages, but only a few inches of snow in town and a few hours of travel problems. The Dry Creek dam controls flooding in WSS. Storm damage will probably be worse in nearby Lewisburg.
Member Since: June 29, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 1
42. johndjr
12:03 PM GMT on October 29, 2012
Gotta 'ditto' previous comments. Weather Underground does a fantastic job - the only place I go to for weather info, and particularly in weather like this. Keep up the good work!
Member Since: May 5, 2003 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
41. Chazman1944
11:59 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
I have friends that just moved to White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. Are they still predicting huge amounts of snow there?
Member Since: October 4, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
40. 5705
11:10 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
McKean County at the 1600' level gets spared most of the time, except for power outages. However, we are going to be belted from the east, west and north.
We have many relatives in NYC/NJ low-lying areas. They are evacuating,but the surges, plus the full tide and the full moon are going to wreak havoc on their homes. Please pray for all the people in the direct path of Sandy.
Thank you.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
39. HeldenMommy
10:59 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Just another thank you... I am stuck far from my family in NJ. Being so worried- you can't know how valuable this site and all the information is to me.

Thank you all for doing what you do!
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
38. ellllen
10:44 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
hope they evacuated the homeless people and the pets / animals also
Member Since: May 11, 2003 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
37. Tingate
9:38 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
What a fantastic summary of Sandy. Thank you, I have family and friends in the potential impact zone, so the information is very informative. From the Gold Coast Australia stay safe.
Member Since: September 18, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
36. XYRSSIE
9:19 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Thank you for your brilliant weather updates. I'm a Brit and my daughter is currently out in North Carolina and it makes all the difference to me to know what is happening with the weather at the moment. Your forecasts are so clear and easy to understand without any dumbing down. Well done.

Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
35. dan1083
5:05 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Your precise info and insight weather-wise is why so many of us out here come to WU! I wish WU had a cable channel. You win hands down over the Weather Channel! Keep up the good work!
Member Since: August 13, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
34. Christopher C. Burt , Weather Historian
4:46 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Excellent round up of the latest warnings state-by-state! I guess now we just wait and see just exactly when and where the storm makes its turn to the west and whether or not it intensifies. It's going to be long night (and day Monday) for millions along the East coast.
Member Since: February 15, 2006 Posts: 289 Comments: 273
33. guldenshowiz
4:46 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Angie - "exacerbated" spelled correctly and used in the appropriate meteorologic context is, like, awesome-sauce!! you go, sis-cephus! And blow east, Sandy.
Member Since: October 26, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
32. AllStar17
4:44 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting angelafritz:
Maine impacts are listed at the top of this blog.


New Hampshire??? Vermont??? I think you may have forgot.
Member Since: June 29, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 5300
31. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
4:19 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Maine impacts are listed at the top of this blog.
30. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
4:09 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting opus32:
I always turn to wunderground before heading out. Thanks!


You're welcome -- stay safe!
29. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
4:09 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting rpnc:
The North Carolina forecasts for wind, rain, inland flooding and power outages are actually an accidental copy of the forecasts for Virginia. The numbers were on the high side for what we expect here, and it puzzled me until I saw the reference to the DC Metro area!


Yes -- thank you!
28. opus32
4:03 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
I always turn to wunderground before heading out. Thanks!
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
27. ericbooth33
3:59 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting angelafritz:


You're very welcome!
this is eric booth
winter snow be head front south
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 13
26. bjc1138
3:40 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Thanks for this great resource! I'd also like to put my request in for WV info.
Quoting ShenandoahOaks:
Where is the information for West Virginia? The Eastern Panhandle of WV is as likely to have storm damage as are PA and western MD.
Member Since: July 16, 2006 Posts: 7 Comments: 0
25. rpnc
3:40 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
The North Carolina forecasts for wind, rain, inland flooding and power outages are actually an accidental copy of the forecasts for Virginia. The numbers were on the high side for what we expect here, and it puzzled me until I saw the reference to the DC Metro area!
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
24. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
3:22 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting S00NR1:
Angie Fritz! So good to see you're doing well. Great info on this page.

-- An old REU friend


Long time no talk! Hope you are well! :)
23. xlr8r
3:11 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Sandy is the size of the gulf of Mexico.
Member Since: June 2, 2005 Posts: 1 Comments: 1
22. bg888
3:01 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Just wanted to say *thank you* for information and not a lot of video. Can't stand watching a video waiting for the snippet of information I need, when I can just *read* it and know in an instant.

Especially in emergency situations, having textual information is a huge relief!

Thanks again!
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
21. ShenandoahOaks
2:40 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Where is the information for West Virginia? The Eastern Panhandle of WV is as likely to have storm damage as are PA and western MD.
Member Since: January 31, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
20. Auspicious
2:37 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Good stuff. Thank you. I would love to see Chesapeake Bay treated separately from the ocean coasts.
Member Since: August 8, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
19. kjwc
2:29 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting ThePineBaron:
KJWC-

Philly is on The Delaware River, which empties into Delaware Bay. The bay literally funnels storm surge into the river.


Ah, I see. Thanks.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1
18. Amazon135
2:11 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting CaptnDwt:
EstherD is Right On. You folks are setting the example for useful information.
Now --
Can you do the above for Maine and New Hampshire, please?
Thanks for all you do!


I second the request for NH and ME :)
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1
17. weatherdanzer
2:10 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Quoting CaptnDwt:
EstherD is Right On. You folks are setting the example for useful information.
Now --
Can you do the above for Maine and New Hampshire, please?
Thanks for all you do!


I'd like to second the request for similar info on NH and Maine seacoast, please.
Thanks for your efforts!
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1
16. Amazon135
2:10 AM GMT on October 29, 2012
Any chance we could get Southern Maine in there?

Love you guys!
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1

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About angelafritz

Atmospheric Scientist here at Weather Underground, with serious nerd love for tropical cyclones and climate change. Twitter: @WunderAngela