Sandy tied for 2nd largest tropical cyclone since 1988

By: Angela Fritz , 12:18 AM GMT on October 28, 2012

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Hurricane Sandy is now the 2nd largest tropical cyclone in the Atlantic since 1988, tied with Hurricane Lili of 1996. Sandy's tropical storm-force winds now extend 450 nautical miles from the center on the northeast side of the hurricane. This is a very, very large storm, and I suspect the #1 spot (Olga of 2001) is in jeopardy, as well.

Top 12 Largest Atlantic Tropical Cyclones

These sizes were determined using the Extended Best Track dataset (Demuth et. al 2006).

Name, Year: Radius of tropical storm-force winds (nautical miles)

1. Olga, 2001: 600
2. Lili, 1996, 450
2. Sandy, 2012: 450
3. Tanya 1995: 400
3. Irene 1999: 400
3. Igor, 2010: 400
4. Wilma, 2005: 375
5. Felix, 1995: 360
5. Michael, 2000 360
5. Irene, 2005: 360
5. Florence, 2006: 360


High resolution MODIS visible satellite image of Hurricane Sandy on October 27, 2012.

Angela

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21. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
11:43 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
angelafritz has created a new entry.
20. linuxtech
8:09 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting linuxtech:

Very Interesting. Can someone point me to some power outage probability maps?
We are in the Northern Neck, the northern most peninsula near Chesapeake Bay in VA, and I am wondering if the power outages will be as bad as Isabel where we were out for almost 14 days.


Dr Master's posted a link and it's hard to tell where we are on the map. I think we are in the 28-45% probability area.
http://releases.jhu.edu/2012/10/27/hurricane-sand y-10-million-could-lose-power/

I think the probability is higher. This is a rural area with lot of trees, and lots of pine trees... Anybody know probabilities based on tropical force winds? Probabilities based on hurricane force gusts?
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2
19. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
3:52 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
Sandy's wind field is continuing to expand today. The tropical storm-force winds are still 450 nautical miles from center in the northeast quadrant, but have increased to 300 nautical miles in the southeast and southwest quadrants, as well. That puts Sandy's diameter at 750 n. miles (or 863 statute miles), which is the driving distance between Boston, Mass. and Charlotte, North Carolina!
18. Gwenivar55
2:50 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
So, I understand that this is a record for October, but a similar storm that happened in September 1938 in New England which actually looks similar in track once it got to the east coast is the un named New England Hurricane or the Long Island Express. It took mostly the same track and killed 682 people and cost 308 million in damage wiping out huge amounts of trees and roads and buildings all over New England. It was moving a lot faster and back then they had no warning, but heavy and wide destruction occurred, yet no one ever wants to talk about it. So there have been bad ones like this and sadly people tend to forget about the possibility of a mega-storm then become complacent and then people die. So sad that the mayor of NY has to be so flippant about what is coming right at him.
Member Since: October 28, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
17. pcola57
2:16 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting ProfRichardHeade:
There are bigger recorded storms that hit the US coastline, the last really large one was in 1949 - but everyone seems to have forgotten it. There were others in 1927, 1893 and even before that. Oh, yes, sorry, they don't fit the pattern....


Is that so?..
Sure would love to see that verifiable data for a comparison ProfRichardHeade.. :)
Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6838
16. ProfRichardHeade
2:12 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
There are bigger recorded storms that hit the US coastline, the last really large one was in 1949 - but everyone seems to have forgotten it. There were others in 1927, 1893 and even before that. Oh, yes, sorry, they don't fit the pattern....
Member Since: October 28, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
15. pcola57
2:10 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting linuxtech:
Very Interesting. Can someone point me to some power outage probability maps?

We are in the Northern Neck, the northern most peninsula near Chesapeake Bay in VA, and I am wondering if the power outages will be as bad as Isabel where we were out for almost 14 days.

Why is Irene listed twice?



The first Irene wasn't retired ..
Thanks Angela for the blog up-date and stats..
Amazing.. :)
PS..I don't have a power grid link..possibly someone may post one yet..
Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6838
14. WeitraLord
1:17 PM GMT on October 28, 2012
Hurikan Sandy LIVE-Stream with open Chat: http://www.qicknews.de/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=39&t =398#p3307

Link
Member Since: September 28, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3
13. linuxtech
6:56 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Very Interesting. Can someone point me to some power outage probability maps?

We are in the Northern Neck, the northern most peninsula near Chesapeake Bay in VA, and I am wondering if the power outages will be as bad as Isabel where we were out for almost 14 days.

Why is Irene listed twice?

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2
12. OracleDeAtlantis
5:28 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Thanks for sharing the info., and the great pic!
Member Since: August 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 525
11. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
4:05 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting jntkwx:

My mistake. Thanks for the clarification.


No problem.

There are many different ways to do this calculation. I'm going to stick with nautical miles and radius (instead of diameter) since it's the most straightforward.
10. jntkwx
3:27 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting angelafritz:


Thanks! That is the conversion from nautical to statute miles.

My mistake. Thanks for the clarification.
Member Since: January 2, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2
9. mexicane
2:25 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Question- Does the guy in previous threads who said his risk management company is forecasting for this storm to generate only 2-5 billion in insurance claims have his resume utd? Because it will probably do about that much before it even makes landfall.
Member Since: August 28, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
8. Angela Fritz , Atmospheric Scientist (Admin)
1:41 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Quoting jntkwx:
It's surpassed Lili. The 8pm 10/27/12 intermediate advisory says tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 520 miles.


Thanks! That is the conversion from nautical to statute miles.
7. frecklespugsley
1:33 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
The oldest record is from 1995. How long have we been recording this data?
Member Since: February 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 48
6. jntkwx
1:32 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
It's surpassed Lili. The 8pm 10/27/12 intermediate advisory says tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 520 miles.
Member Since: January 2, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2
5. Slamguitar
1:08 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Truly a unique storm in so many ways! Thank you Angela!
Member Since: July 2, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1183
4. Astrometeor
12:37 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Should easily break that tie and become the lone storm in second place, maybe get first but that would be hard to do.
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 101 Comments: 10326
3. CybrTeddy
12:30 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Beast of a hurricane in terms of size.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24161
2. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
12:29 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
Special weather statement for:
=new= Greater Sudbury and vicinity
=new= Kirkland Lake - New Liskeard - Temagami
=new= Manitoulin - Blind River - Killarney
=new= North Bay - West Nipissing.

First significant snowfall of the season possible
Monday.
------------------------------------------------- --------------------
==discussion==

A large and powerful fall storm that is expected to affect
Southern Ontario is also threatening to spread snow into parts of
Northeastern Ontario for Monday.

Significant snowfall amounts of 10 to 15 cm or more are quite
possible on Monday. In addition strong northerly winds may also
result in very low visibility in blowing snow in areas where the
temperature remains at or below freezing.

Snowfall amounts will depend on the exact track and intensity of
The storm itself as it moves closer to the regions on Monday. They
will also depend on the temperature, as areas where the temperature
stays just above freezing may receive some of the precipitation in
the form of rain or a rain-wet snow mix.

The public is advised to monitor future forecasts and warnings as
warnings may be required or extended.

END/OSPC



Special weather statement for:
City of Toronto
Windsor - Essex - Chatham-Kent
Sarnia - Lambton
Elgin
London - Middlesex
Simcoe - Delhi - Norfolk
Dunnville - Caledonia - Haldimand
Oxford - Brant
Niagara
City of Hamilton
Halton - Peel
York - Durham
Huron - Perth
Waterloo - Wellington
Dufferin - Innisfil
Grey - Bruce
Barrie - Orillia - Midland
Belleville - Quinte - Northumberland
Kingston - Prince Edward
Peterborough - Kawartha Lakes
Stirling - Tweed - South Frontenac
Bancroft - Bon Echo Park
Brockville - Leeds and Grenville
City of Ottawa
Gatineau
Prescott and Russell
Cornwall - Morrisburg
Smiths Falls - Lanark - Sharbot Lake
Parry Sound - Muskoka
Haliburton
Renfrew - Pembroke - Barry's Bay
Algonquin
Burk's Falls - Bayfield Inlet.

Wet, windy and wild weather likely beginning late Monday.


------------------------------------------------- --------------------
==discussion==
The remnants of hurricane Sandy will probably arrive late Monday as a
large and powerful post tropical fall storm over Southern Ontario.
It will likely track from the Atlantic ocean across the mid Atlantic
states then take an unusual path towards the Lower Great Lakes.

If the storm curves towards the Eastern Seaboard, which a consensus
of numerous computer weather models continues to suggest, there is
little doubt the Northeastern United States will take the brunt of
the storm. There is also the potential for significant impacts
In Southern and Eastern Ontario too. Significant rainfall appears
likely late Monday into Tuesday. Strong and gusty winds will also
accompany this storm if it takes this path. The storm will likely
weaken later Tuesday and on Halloween, but it will remain cool, damp
and may still be somewhat windy for the trick or treaters.

A narrow band of wet snow is possible over the Haliburton Highlands
and the higher ground southwest of Georgian Bay. It may be the first
measurable snowfall of the season if temperatures flirt with the
freezing mark, but it doesn'T appear to be significant at this time.

A complicating factor is the presence of a stalled front now over
Southern Ontario. Moisture-laden post-tropical storms interacting
with fronts can produce significant rainfall. Persistent rain is
forecast near this front for Sunday and Monday leading up to the
arrival of Sandy. It may amount to 20 to 30 mm or more over this
period, especially across Niagara, southcentral Ontario and north to
Georgian Bay. An additional 30 to 50 mm is expected with Sandy with
excessive amounts of 50 to 100 mm indeed quite possible. The
Forecast track would also produce widespread 50 to 70 km/h strong
winds across Southern Ontario beginning later Monday. Severe gusts
To 100 km/h are also likely, as well as storm force winds on the
Great Lakes. The combination of sodden ground, strong winds and some
residual leaves on trees will likely lead to areas of power outages
due to fallen limbs and some downed trees on snapped wires.

It is important to put this storm in perspective. The main reason it
continues to receive considerable press is the forecast intensity by
various weather models, as well as the heavily-populated
Northeastern United States that would feel its greatest impact. Many
weather models continue to forecast the storm achieving an
unprecedented low central pressure as it comes ashore late Monday.
Generally speaking, the lower the pressure: the more intense the
winds and rain around the storm. Even if the computer models are
overdoing the strength of this storm, it may still be a memorable
wind-blasted soaker of a fall storm to reckon with.

Rainfall and wind warnings may be issued by Monday morning for parts
of Southern and Eastern Ontario as this event draws closer and its
exact path and intensity become less uncertain.

More information can be found in the WOCN31 CWHX tropical cyclone
information statement updated by the Canadian Hurricane Centre of
Environment Canada.

The public is advised to monitor future forecasts and warnings as
warnings may be required or extended.

END/ASHTON/KUHN/OSPC
.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 173 Comments: 54283
1. Caneguy
12:20 AM GMT on October 28, 2012
interesting indeed. Thanks Angela!
Member Since: August 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 12

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About angelafritz

Atmospheric Scientist here at Weather Underground, with serious nerd love for tropical cyclones and climate change. Twitter: @WunderAngela

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