Duffy

By: Willow13 , 12:02 AM GMT on May 04, 2008

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Okay, It's official! Duffy is dancing and that isn't a transmitter on his back, it's a receiver and Duffy is listening to the Kermit the Frog's version of an Octopus' Garden

http://www.wunderground.com/wximage/viewsingleimage.html?mode=singleimage&handle=Willow13&number=61 3&album_id=136&thumbstart=1&gallery=EDITORSPICK#slideanchor



May 3, 2009 --Last time Dylan "Called Home" ;) She is west of Key West, Florida. Track Dylan, and other sea turtles at www.seaturtle.org

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta
-Please click to keep us #1
http://www.jekyllisland.com/store/shopexd.asp?id=179 - buy it online
Sandy Davis, Inspiration/Steering Director
Richard Caton, Cover Art and Illustrations
Erik Munos, Jekyll Island Club Hotel Chef
Benjamin Lane Carswell, Foreword
Matthew Lamar Carswell, WebPage
Maud Trismen Tucker, Patron
Jan Caton, Mentor
Recipe Contributors from all over the World!




Good news about one of our favorite sea turtles, Dylan :)
For the Turtles,
Dorothy


Dylan’s back!

Believe it or not, Dylan is back on the map! As most of you probably know from following her tracking map on www.seaturtle.org, the last signal we received from her was on October 30, 2008. Well surprise, surprise…out of no where she transmitted 2 very good, high quality signals on Feb 25, 2009…in the Gulf of Mexico no less!


As explained in previous BLOGs, the loss of satellite transmission was probably due more to a problem with the transmitter (dead battery, broken antennae, internal malfunction and/or dislodged unit) rather than a problem with the turtle herself. Dylan has always been a feisty juvenile sea turtle and juveniles are known to be tough on their transmitters. So although we hope for 1-2 years of transmissions from any turtle we release with a transmitter, it was not a big surprise when she stoppped transmitting.

How did she get into the Gulf of Mexico from the east coast of Florida? Glad you asked! No, she didn’t cross over the peninsula by car, plane or train. Nor did she crawl over land. And it is highly unlikely that someone carried her. The most logical explanation is that she swam south along the east coast of Florida, around the keys and out into the Gulf. This migration may be the explanation as to why we haven’t received any good signals from her in a while. If she was traveling and spending a lot of time underwater, the transmitter wasn’t being allowed enough surface time to transmit a good signal.
So for now, she looks like she’s doing just fine, behavinglike a ‘normal’ sea turtle and going where sea turtles in her size class go. Let’s hope she keeps transmitting! Click here to check out Dylan’s tracking page.

Sincerely,
Stefanie Ouellette
Marine Field Programs Coordinator

georgiaseaturtlecenter.org

---previous entry---

Dylan is transmitting signals again!!!! Yippie!!!! She went south of Vero Beach and then she got in the Gulf Stream and she's coming north towards us :)

I'm watching T.S. Fay and thinking about the email Jeff Masters posted about sea turtles not nesting in locations where hurricanes hit. It would be interesting to see data on this. On Jekyll Island, we are recording one of our most prolific nesting seasons. Does that mean we are safe from a hurricane this year?

Fay cut short our nesting season, but it looks like we only lost 8% of the nests. Nearly half of all the nests had already hatched before Fay came along.

I have added a wonderful photo by Barrierislandgirl of the rare and most endangered of all the sea turtles, Kemp's ridley. We rescued several juvenile "cold-stunned" Kemp's ridley sea turtles last December. They were flown by private jet to the GA Sea Turtle Center to "winter" in safety so they could be brought back to health and later released in warm weather. See my photo of Tweety being released last Spring.

We still haven't "heard" from Dylan :(
Here an email from the Georgia Sea Turtle Center about the possible reasons.
****************
Hi Dorothy,
We have received both of your emails concerning Dylan. Sometimes it's a waiting game with the transmissions. In certain areas the signals can be jammed (i.e. Canaveral), the satellite orbits might be off, the seas could be very rough, not allowing signals to be transmitted, or the turtle might be spending a lot of time underwater, not allowing us to get very good signals.

Just as Bev's signal was 'lost' for a while, but started transmitting again recently. Just as Spitfire and Vida's signals were 'lost' for a time (coincidentally, the same time! but then again they were in the same 'area' as one another...),but again came back. Dylan's signal loss may be temporarily. Her most recent low-class 'hits' were on 8/7 and 8/8, and suggested that she was spending a LOT of time underwater, possibly resulting in bad satellite timing. Also, looking at her location, she IS near Canaveral....

We will just have to wait patiently and see what happens! The possibility of going out to look for her is not realistic. The resources are not there, but more importantly, it would be like looking for one particular snake somewhere in all the cornfields of Iowa. She's underwater somewhere in a few thousand square miles of ocean, only comes to the surface rarely, and even if when she comes to the surface it takes a full minute for her transmitter to send a burst so there's no way to really "look" for her or to triangulate on her signal (unless she ends up behind a barrier island or up a river, then it becomes remotely possible because we have a much smaller and defined area to look in and her movements are limted...). Does that make sense?

I hope this explanation helps! We'll keep an eye on her tracking and see what happens! Thank you for your concern.

Sincerely,
The GSTC Staff

Georgia Sea Turtle Center
214 Stable Road
Jekyll Island, Georgia 31527
Office: (912) 635-4444
Fax: (912) 635-4004
www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org



I hope she is ok!!!!! I've read the FAQ, so I know all the things that can go wrong with the transmitters, but I miss her signals :(

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta


http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :)


It's been more than a week since we have received any information about Dylan, our most famous sea turtle friend, and ambassador for sea turtles all over the world. Dylan is a Loggerhead Sea Turtle. Her scientific name is Caretta caretta. I hope she is ok. Please keep her in your thoughts and prayers for a safe journey.

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta





Dylan continues to be our Star :) I'm so happy for her swimming free in the Big Blue! I went to say goodbye to her the day before she was released. She looked at me with those beautiful eyes that always leaves me in awe! I watch her tracking satellite everyday. It was scary when it seemed she was stuck behind Cumberland Island. Now she is well on her way to wherever she is going :) She was swept up in the Gulf Stream and traveled north for about 20 miles, then she must have thought ... WHOA, I want to go SOUTH and she made her way out of the Gulf Stream and swam over to just north of Cape Canaveral! I'm so excited for her! I get this wonderful feeling that she is having so much fun exploring and being a free swimming sea turtle.

To see where Dylan is today, go to http://www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org/ and click on Track Dylan Online! This morning, Dylan was south of Orlando, and swimming towards the Gulf Stream, again. It will be interesting to see if she gets in the Gulf Stream again or just hangs around the edge and eats from the smorgasbord spinning out. I don't know if that is really what is happening at the edge of the Gulf Stream or not ;) ... maybe it's like in Finding Nemo ...

Just had to share this :) It's a turtle impersonating Kermit the Frog :)




The release was June 30 on Jekyll Island at the beach in front of the Convention Center at approximately 11:00 am.

Good Morning America aired the release, bringing national coverage to Dylan, the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, and the plight of sea turtles everywhere!

For the Turtles,

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta
-Please click to keep us #1
Sandy Davis, Inspiration/Steering Director
Richard Caton, Cover Art and Illustrations
Erik Munos, Jekyll Island Club Hotel Chef
Benjamin Lane Carswell, Foreword
Matthew Lamar Carswell, WebPage
Maud Trismen Tucker, Patron
Jan Caton, Mentor
Recipe Contributors from all over the World!

It's the moment we've all been waiting for and the time has finally come to say 'good-bye'..but in a good way! Dylan is very healthy, eating live prey with vigor, and truly an absolutely beautiful sea turtle. It is time for her to join the wild population! Please join us in celebrating this wonderous occasion!

As you may know Dylan, was a straggler sea turtle when she hatched from the egg and has been an ambassador for her species for the last 10 years, first on Jekyll Island at the Tidelands Nature Center, then the Georgia Aquarium and for the last year at the GSTC. The GSTC staff feels Dylan has been a great representative of sea turtle education and conservation and hopefully will continue to spread the word about the plight of the sea turtle and the marine ecosystem.

Please accept our sincere apology for the confusion and various changes in release dates over the past few weeks, but we wanted to be sure everyone involved in Dylan's life in captivity was able to be a part of her release. We thank you for your continued support, patience and understanding. We are also very excited to tell you that Dylan’s release will be a special highlight on Good Morning America!

Here is the latest information:
Pre-release Info:
Dylan will be receiving her flipper tags, PIT tag and a satellite transmitter on June 29, approximately 3pm. If you are at the Center, you will be able to view this through our Treatment Room Window!

Release Info:
The release is now scheduled and being planned for June 30. She will be released on Jekyll Island at the beach in front of the Convention Center at approximately 11:00 am. There will be a roped off area for public viewing on a first come, first serve basis.

Good Morning America will be taping the release, which will be aired later in the week, bringing national coverage to Dylan, the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, and the plight of sea turtles everywhere!

- The above info was copied from the blog


About Spitfire:

Spitfire, a rescued Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta), was released back into the Atlantic Ocean. Spitfire's bio - He has been rambunctiously swimming about his tank and eating everything in site since his arrival. He came to us from the Marine Science Center in Volusia County Florida on December 3. 2007. He originally stranded October 1, 2007 off the coast of Daytona, Florida. Spitfire was floating and unable to dive correctly. After his rehabilitation, Spitfire had a satellite Tracking device attached to his carapace. Good Luck to Spitfire. Follow his travels in the Big Blue http://www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta

-Please click to keep us #1

This is an absolutely beautiful cookbook with an original watercolor painting of Jekyll Island on the cover. The delightful divider illustrations are whimsical, funny, and entertaining! The page fillers which are used when extra space is left on a recipe page are adorable sea turtle hatchlings with the most interesting facts about the Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle. No, we are not cooking turtles, we are cooking to save the turtles. Some of the recipes donated have been in families for generations. Some are recipes sought after diligently and persistently whenever they are served. Contributors from all over the world donated their very best recipes to make this truly an outstanding cookbook that will surely become a staple with cooks of all ages and abilities. These recipes are tried and true favorites. This award winning book has been selected by Morris Press (largest publisher of cookbooks in the nation) as one of the 10 best cookbooks of 2005.

Spitfire (Willow13)
Spitfire, a rescued Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta), was released back into the Atlantic Ocean. Spitfire's bio - He has been rambunctiously swimming about his tank and eating everything in site since his arrival. He came to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center on Jekyll Island from the Marine Science Center in Volusia County Florida on December 3. 2007. He originally stranded October 1, 2007 off the coast of Daytona, Florida. Spitfire was floating and unable to dive correctly. After his rehabilitation at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, Spitfire had a satellite Tracking device attached to his carapace. Good Luck to Spitfire. Follow his travels in the Big Blue http://www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org
Spitfire
Spitfire (Willow13)
Spitfire, a rescued Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta), was released back into the Atlantic Ocean. Spitfire's bio - He has been rambunctiously swimming about his tank and eating everything in site since his arrival. He came to us from the Marine Science Center in Volusia County Florida on December 3. 2007. He originally stranded October 1, 2007 off the coast of Daytona, Florida. Spitfire was floating and unable to dive correctly. After his rehabilitation, Spitfire had a satellite Tracking device attached to his carapace. Good Luck to Spitfire. Follow his travels in the Big Blue http://www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org
Spitfire
Helping Hands (Willow13)
Spitfire, a rescued Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta), was released back into the Atlantic Ocean. Spitfire's bio - He has been rambunctiously swimming about his tank and eating everything in site since his arrival. He came to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center on Jekyll Island from the Marine Science Center in Volusia County Florida on December 3. 2007. He originally stranded October 1, 2007 off the coast of Daytona, Florida. Spitfire was floating and unable to dive correctly. After his rehabilitation at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, Spitfire had a satellite Tracking device attached to his carapace. Good Luck to Spitfire. Follow his travels in the Big Blue http://www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org
Helping Hands
Kermit and Tweety (Willow13)
Tweety is a Kemp's Ridley, the most endangered of all the Sea Turtles. Kermit is a Green Sea Turtle. Tweety and Kermit have been at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center since their rescue from the cold waters off the coast of Massachusetts. Today is their lucky day because they will have a second chance to live in the ocean and grow to be adult sea turtles.
Kermit and Tweety
Green Sea Turtle (Willow13)
This is Kermit :) Kermit is a Green Sea Turtle. Kermit is one of two "cold-stunned" turtles brought to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center last December from Massachusetts. Today, because of the care given to him at the GA Sea Turtle Center, Kermit has a second chance to grow up in the Big Blue Ocean.
Green Sea Turtle
Sea Turtles Released (Willow13)
This shows the volunteers holding up the posters with the sea turtle's names, with autographs and best wishes by their devoted fans. The turtles are being carried out past the breaking waves to be gently released into the Big Blue :)
Sea Turtles Released
Farewell (Willow13)
DEVOTED SEA TURTLE FANS!
Farewell
Farewell (Willow13)
Tweety is a Kemp's Ridley, the most endangered of all the Sea Turtles. Kermit is a Green Sea Turtle. Tweety and Kermit have been at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center since their rescue from the cold waters off the coast of Massachusetts. Today is their lucky day because they will have a second chance to live in the ocean and grow to be adult sea turtles.
Farewell
Goin' Home (Willow13)
Tweety is a Kemp's Ridley, the most endangered of all the Sea Turtles. Kermit is a Green Sea Turtle. Tweety and Kermit have been at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center since their rescue from the cold waters off the coast of Massachusetts. Today is their lucky day because they will have a second chance to live in the ocean and grow to be adult sea turtles.
Goin' Home
Diamond Back Tarrapin (SunsetSailor)
This little guy was on my road, attempting to get to the tidal river near by. I helped him to safety. About 3 inches long, he may have been a layover for the winter from a hatching last year.
Diamond Back  Tarrapin
Look Out! Turtles Crossing (Willow13)
Have you ever seen a sign for turtles crossing the road? Well, there are two on the way to Jekyll Island, one at each end of the causeway. The turtles are Diamondback terrapins coming up out of the marsh to lay their eggs on high ground. They don't know about roads, so we have to watch out for them.
Look Out! Turtles Crossing
Terrapin Xing (Willow13)
This is one of the new signs to help people watch out for Diamondback Terrapins. From May - July, the turtles seek high ground to lay their eggs. Unfortunately when the high ground is a causeway to an island, a lot of turtles are in danger if people do not watch out for them.
Terrapin Xing
Caretta caretta (Willow13)
Dylan is a nine year old Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) living at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center. When the water warms up this Spring, Dylan will be released to her ocean home.
Caretta caretta
Caretta caretta (Willow13)
Dylan is a nine year old Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) living at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center. When the water warms up this Spring, Dylan will be released to her ocean home.
Caretta caretta
Dylan's Enrichment (Willow13)
This is Dylan chasing her block of ice. Inside the ice Dylan knows she will find yummy Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle food! Dylan is learning to be a wild sea turtle. This way of feeding challenges and exercises her as she chases the ice around her tank. Dylan also eats live crabs which are a natural part of a loggerhead's diet. When Dylan is released next year she will be well prepared for life on her own in the Big Blue :) We have a cookbook we published to help raise the funds to care for these magnificent animals. It's called, Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta. If you go to this website, www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 you will find links to a wealth of information about the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and all the wonderful turtles in our care. Be sure and go to the blog www.gstc.blogspot.com to get all the latest information on our new arrivals - 5 young Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and 2 young Kemp's Ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) - the most endangered of all the sea turle species. The 7 young sea turtles were rescued after being "cold-stunned" and stranded up north. They arrived at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center yesterday!
Dylan's Enrichment
Ice Block Beware! (Willow13)
This is Dylan sneaking up from below on her block of ice. Inside the ice Dylan knows she will find yummy Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle food! Dylan is learning to be a wild sea turtle. This way of feeding challenges and exercises her as she chases the ice around her tank. Dylan also eats live crabs which are a natural part of a loggerhead's diet. When Dylan is released next year she will be well prepared for life on her own in the Big Blue :)We have a cookbook we published to help raise the funds to care for these magnificent animals. It's called, Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta. If you go to this website,www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 you will find links to a wealth of information about the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and all the wonderful turtles in our care. Be sure and go to the blog www.gstc.blogspot.com to get all the latest information on our new arrivals - 5 young Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and 2 young Kemp's Ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) - the most endangered of all the sea turle species. The 7 young sea turtles were rescued after being "cold-stunned" and stranded up north. They arrived at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center yesterday!
Ice Block Beware!
Ice Block Beware! (Willow13)
This is Dylan sneaking up from below on her block of ice. Inside the ice Dylan knows she will find yummy Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle food! Dylan is learning to be a wild sea turtle. This way of feeding challenges and exercises her as she chases the ice around her tank. Dylan also eats live crabs which are a natural part of a loggerhead's diet. When Dylan is released next year she will be well prepared for life on her own in the Big Blue :)We have a cookbook we published to help raise the funds to care for these magnificent animals. It's called, Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta. If you go to this website,www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 you will find links to a wealth of information about the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and all the wonderful turtles in our care. Be sure and go to the blog www.gstc.blogspot.com to get all the latest information on our new arrivals - 5 young Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and 2 young Kemp's Ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) - the most endangered of all the sea turle species. The 7 young sea turtles were rescued after being "cold-stunned" and stranded up north. They arrived at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center yesterday!
Ice Block Beware!
Dylan's Enrichment (Willow13)
This is Dylan chasing her block of ice. Inside the ice Dylan knows she will find yummy Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle food! Dylan is learning to be a wild sea turtle. This way of feeding challenges and exercises her as she chases the ice around her tank. Dylan also eats live crabs which are a natural part of a loggerhead's diet. When Dylan is released next year she will be well prepared for life on her own in the Big Blue :)We have a cookbook we published to help raise the funds to care for these magnificent animals. It's called, Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta. If you go to this website,www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 you will find links to a wealth of information about the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and all the wonderful turtles in our care. Be sure and go to the blog www.gstc.blogspot.com to get all the latest information on our new arrivals - 5 young Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and 2 young Kemp's Ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) - the most endangered of all the sea turle species. The 7 young sea turtles were rescued after being "cold-stunned" and stranded up north. They arrived at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center yesterday!
Dylan's Enrichment
Last bite! (Willow13)
And it's only a small piece of ice. She finished off the yummy morsels frozen in the large block of ice and now Dylan's enrichment is completed for today :) Don't forget to check out, Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta, www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 -Please click to help us be #1 in most "Hits". 100% of the profit goes to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center for the care of these magnificent animals, our ambassadors of the oceans. For the Turtles, THANK YOU!
Last bite!
Nap Time : ) (Willow13)
After chasing her block of ice filled with yummy treats, Dylan looks very sleepy in this photo!
Nap Time : )
Peek-a-Boo (Willow13)
Sea turtles only have to come up to breathe about every 5 minutes, but when they are sleeping, they can stay under water for as long as 30 minutes. Dylan likes to come up to see her visitors and she will hold her head above the water long enough to make eye contact before going back below the surface. In this photo she is playing Peek-a boo with me :) Looking for a last minute gift? You can adopt Dylan or any of the Georgia Sea Turtle Center turtles! Here's the info from the website: georgiaseaturtlecenter.org/adoptaturtle.html "Now you can "adopt a turtle," and for only $50, you can contribute to that turtle's rehabilitation. When that turtle is released, you will be able to track the turtle online and know that you helped to make him/her healthy enough to go back home! Or, you can adopt a turtle that has already been release, helping to pay for the research we are conducting so we can help sea turtles all over the world! If you adopt a turtle while the turtle is a current patient, you receive: A. In-house 1.Official Certificate of Adoption 2.Letter from Turtle 3.5x7 photo of turtle 4.Name listed on website adoption page 5.Weekly Update and photo (via email-pdf) until turtle is released or expires 6.Advance notice of potential release date (when applicable) B. Upon release of adopted patient: 1.Entrance to VIP area at release for 2 people 2.Link to satellite tracking (if available) If you adopt an already released & satellite tagged turtle while the turtle is a current patient, you receive: 1.Official Certificate of Adoption 2.Letter from Turtle 3.5x7 picture of turtle 4.Name listed on website adoption page 5.Link to satellite tracking To adopt a turtle, call the Center at 912-635-4444."
Peek-a-Boo
I See You! (Willow13)
Making eye contact with a sea turtle is awesome! It's so amazing, it makes me speechless!
I See You!
Kemp's ridley release (Barrierislandgirl)
Another exciting release of endangered Kemp's ridleys sea turtles today! Magnificent little creatures. A really great thing is that we had media attend the release! Every bit of education is a boon to their survival!
Kemp's ridley release
Turtle Nest Check Beach Patrol (SunsetSailor)
The guy in blue just checked out turtle nests in the dunes just above the high water line.
Turtle  Nest Check Beach Patrol
Gustav and Sea Turtle nests (Barrierislandgirl)
High surf from Hurricane Gustav floods a Pensacola Beach sea turtle nest which was due to hatch September 11 and a storm-tossed piling sets atop the nest.
Gustav and Sea Turtle nests
Hey There (myhomeisinheaven)
Now may the Lord of peace himself give you peace at all times and in every way. The Lord be with all of you. ~Paul
Hey There
Preparing for Ike (Barrierislandgirl)
Remember what this nest looked like on September 1 during Gustav?! Washed over and covered with a piling, it managed to survive and there is activity in the nest! Hopefully they will survive the night.
Preparing for Ike
()
sea turtle (sb)
sea turtle
()
Duffy, the Loggerhead (Caretta caretta)Sea Turtle returns to the Big Blue! (Willow13)
A great day for two Loggerhead Sea Turtles to go back to their ocean home. Find out how to track them online at www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org
Duffy, the Loggerhead (Caretta caretta)Sea Turtle returns to the Big Blue!
Enjoying the first sunny day in several days! (Craiglowry25)
I took this photo with a 500mm lens. This common snapper was very far away. The really was as large as he looks. This photo is not a crop!
Enjoying the first sunny day in several days!
Mud turtle laying eggs (rebel13)
We call these mud turtles but I could be wrong. I didn't realize there were so many variations of mud turtle. This lady was twice the size of any I've seen but they are usually in the muckiest part of the swamp with just the tip of the nose out of the water so difficult to see. The odds are some varmint will find the eggs before they hatch.
Mud turtle laying eggs
Duffy waves Bye-Bye (Willow13)
Information from the www.georgiaseaturtlecenter.org site ---
Duffy waves Bye-Bye
Mug Shot.... (JasonMac78)
...the turtles wouldn't come out of the water,so I zoomed in close for a mug shot,maybe a little too close? The turtles are in the murky wetlands of Sugar Hollow Park.
Mug Shot....
Sea Turtles (Olbetsy)
mating
Sea Turtles
A Large Female Trachemys scripta elegans (Craiglowry25)
Enjoying the sun on a beautiful day in Chicago
A Large Female Trachemys scripta elegans

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33. SunsetSailor
2:26 PM GMT on January 25, 2013
Just found you a new sea turtle pic from the current photo galleries.
"FOR THE TURTLES"
Member Since: June 22, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 2218
32. ronni9
4:45 PM GMT on April 20, 2009




JUST STOP BY TO SAY ----------


MySpace Graphics


\\\\\ COME BY AND SEE ME SOME TIME /////

R9
Member Since: December 3, 2007 Posts: 5 Comments: 850
31. Willow13
3:36 PM GMT on March 09, 2009
Here is some good news about one of our favorite sea turtles, Dylan :-)
For the Turtles,
Dorothy


Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta
http://www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 -Please click to keep us #1
http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :-)
Recipe Contributors from all over the World!


Here is a note from Stefanie Ouellette
Marine Field Programs Coordinator at the GSTC


Dylan’s back!

Believe it or not, Dylan is back on the map! As most of you probably know from following her tracking map on www.seaturtle.org, the last signal we received from her was on October 30, 2008. Well surprise, surprise…out of no where she transmitted 2 very good, high quality signals on Feb 25, 2009…in the Gulf of Mexico no less!

As explained in previous BLOGs, the loss of satellite transmission was probably due more to a problem with the transmitter (dead battery, broken antennae, internal malfunction and/or dislodged unit) rather than a problem with the turtle herself. Dylan has always been a feisty juvenile sea turtle and juveniles are known to be tough on their transmitters. So although we hope for 1-2 years of transmissions from any turtle we release with a transmitter, it was not a big surprise when she stoppped transmitting.

How did she get into the Gulf of Mexico from the east coast of Florida? Glad you asked! No, she didn’t cross over the peninsula by car, plane or train. Nor did she crawl over land. And it is highly unlikely that someone carried her. The most logical explanation is that she swam south along the east coast of Florida, around the keys and out into the Gulf. This migration may be the explanation as to why we haven’t received any good signals from her in a while. If she was traveling and spending a lot of time underwater, the transmitter wasn’t being allowed enough surface time to transmit a good signal.
So for now, she looks like she’s doing just fine, behavinglike a ‘normal’ sea turtle and going where sea turtles in her size class go. Let’s hope she keeps transmitting! Click here to check out Dylan’s tracking page.

Sincerely,
Stefanie Ouellette
Marine Field Programs Coordinator
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
30. Willow13
2:40 PM GMT on March 09, 2009
Dylan is in the Gulf of Mexico!!!!

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta


http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :)

Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
29. shoreacres
3:11 AM GMT on January 08, 2009
Hi, Dorothy,

Just a note to let you know my little tumble-turtle is doing just fine. The bleeding stopped, and he's eating and there's no evidence of infection or internal injury. The shell was intact, apart from a hairline on one edge that got fiberglassed (that just cracks me up).

I finally made the effort to find Dylan's link, but I'm putting that aside because I have chores to do tonight, don't you know! But now I can come back and keep an eye on things. I loved it when I had an osprey nest in my blog - amazing what we can do.
Member Since: October 4, 2004 Posts: 205 Comments: 15288
28. surfmom
10:43 AM GMT on December 26, 2008
I stumbled in here -- having seen your post early this AM -- WOW -- just loved your story (houseboat) I've got two boys as well -- and always have the camera -- we laughed and say their every move has been documented.
Raising them in FL turn me into quite different person then the city girl I was -- we live outdoors.

Most especially intrigued and enjoyed your work w/the sea turtles!!! Wonderful story to ready and wake up too! How is Dylan?
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
27. sugarsand
2:26 AM GMT on December 26, 2008
Willow
Your turtle and Newfie photos are great. Thanks for sharing.
Member Since: September 13, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 2953
26. Willow13
8:33 PM GMT on September 08, 2008
Hi Laura :)

Yes, we are so fortunate to be able to go with our released rescues by way of the satelite transmitter and know that they are swimming freely as nature intended. It's such a wonderful feeling to know that they are safe, too! I was so worried when I didn't hear from Dylan for weeks. There is something around NASA that blocks the signals, so she was fine :) It would be fun for us to have her come back to visit us on Jekyll Island, but since she is still a juvenile, she won't come ashore to nest for probably 25 years! A sea turtle reaches maturity at around 35 years of age and Dylan is only 10 years old.

Thanks for the congrats on the AC ... I can't believe I almost didn't upload that picture.

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
25. Willow13
8:13 PM GMT on September 08, 2008
Hi MNTornado,

Cold-stunned happens when a sea turtle travels too far north and the water temperature drops too quickly for the turtle to swim back to warmer waters. Luckily these sea turtles were rescued :)

Thank you so much for your interest!
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
24. SunsetSailor
12:15 PM GMT on September 08, 2008
Good Morning Dorothy,
I just checked on Dylan's ramblings over the weekend. I'm so glad you've heard from her. Aren't these critter cams wonderful. I've watched ospreys in Scotland and wild African animals at a watering hole, and now I've floated on the back of a sea turtle over a choral reef.
BTW - congrats on your 2nd AC.
Laura
Member Since: June 22, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 2218
23. MNTornado
6:26 AM GMT on September 08, 2008
Hi there Willow13,
I've never known anyone who works with turtles before. I am curious what is meant by "Cold Stuned"? Never heard that term before. Can you explain? Thank you.
Member Since: July 1, 2005 Posts: 154 Comments: 19314
22. Willow13
2:24 PM GMT on August 22, 2008
Hello shoreacres :)

Thank you so much! SunsetSailor does live nearby :) She is just as wonderful as her photos, too! I LOVE that pic of the Diamondback Terrapin! She looks so sweet and the folds in her neck look like a pretty head scarf ... oh! she's wearing a turtleneck!

Still no word from Dylan :(
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
21. shoreacres
11:12 AM GMT on August 22, 2008
Good morning!

Lovely new photos. And, I just noticed SunsetSailor's name on one of those pics - putting things together, I think you must be near one another. What a great photographer to have nearby to record some of these great (and small!) events.
Member Since: October 4, 2004 Posts: 205 Comments: 15288
20. Willow13
1:56 PM GMT on August 18, 2008
Good Morning!

I'm watching T.S. Fay and thinking about the email Jeff Masters posted about sea turtles not nesting in locations where hurricanes hit. It would be interesting to see data on this. On Jekyll Island, we are recording one of our most prolific nesting seasons. Does that mean we are safe from a hurricane this year?

I have added a wonderful photo by Barrierislandgirl of the rare and most endangered of all the sea turtles, Kemp's ridley. We rescued several juvenile "cold-stunned" Kemp's ridley sea turtles last December. They were flown by private jet to the GA Sea Turtle Center to "winter" in safety so they could be brought back to health and later released in warm weather. See my photo of Tweety being released last Spring.
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
19. Willow13
1:36 PM GMT on August 15, 2008
Thank you for writing shoreacres. When they look at you with those big beautiful eyes, you know the bond is forever :)

Still no word from Dylan ... here are some reasons from SEATURTLE.ORG

Satellite Tracking

This free resource is made possible by donations from seaturtle.org supporters - if you find the Sea Turtle Satellite Tracking Project helpful, consider making a donation today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Why did turtle X stop transmitting?

When turtles reach their foraging locations, they spend an even greater proportion of their time underwater and thus will transmit less frequently. Given transmissions can only be picked up during a few short windows each day, by chance this means that there may be periods of several days or longer with no transmissions received. As water temperatures cool, turtles may spend large amounts of time on the seabed effectively 'hibernating'; coming up for air after extended intervals, further exasperating the lack of data transmitted.

Eventually, however, all transmitters stop sending information. There are a whole suite of reasons why we might cease to receive transmissions from one of the turtles we are tracking:

1. Dead Battery: It appears from the results of most workers that few transmitters actually reach the end of their working battery life with some other factor being responsible for premature cessation of transmissions. In general transmitters will only actively try and send data to the satellite when the turtle is at the surface (see Saltwater Switch Failure below). Given that most turtles spend >97% of their time submerged and, even the smallest of transmitters have a battery life of some 20 days or more,most should last at least a year.
2. Attachment Failure: Sea turtles are known to like to hide under rocks and submerged reefs when resting and loggerhead turtles have even been observed 'scratching' their backs on these reefs, possibly to reduce often heavy barnacle loads. These behavioursmay dislodge the transmitter. Satellite transmitters typically do not float so when they are dislodged, they fall to the seabed and will not send anymore effective signals. Our attachment methods have improved greatly over the years and a transmitter can be expected to remain attached to a turtle for a year or morewhich is long enough for us to observe migratory routes and describe feeding locations.
3. Antenna Failure: Although turtles my not wholly dislodge their transmitter whilst undertaking back scratching and resting under rocky ledges, they may damage the antenna. Many turtle biologists feel that this is the number one reason for transmitter failure despite efforts to design more sturdy antennae.
4. Saltwater Switch Failure: To extend battery life all transmitters have a saltwater switch which is broken as the animal surfaces allowing economic use of battery life. A transmitter may become fouled with marine organisms, such as algae, which may temporarily inhibit the saltwater switch and cause the transmitter to be unable to recognize when the turtle is at the surface. If a more permanent attachment by a marine organism occurs, such as an encrusting coral species, mussels or barnacles, then transmission may be permanently inhibited, even though the batteries are not dead.
5. Turtle Mortality: Many turtles each year are captured in marine fisheries and a proportion are killed. Often these events can be identified as suddenly changing transmission frequency and location quality increase, often suggesting fast linear movements towards fishing harbours (i.e. movement of the fishing vessel). Transmitters with depth sensors or surface counters sometimes send data showing the transmitter at the surface. Undoubtedly, however, in a proportion of cases the capture event could occur when there are no satellites overhead and the transmitter is irretrievable damaged or discarded either with or separately from the turtle before a transmission indicating the capture can be received.
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
18. shoreacres
12:33 PM GMT on August 15, 2008
Good morning!

I had just missed this story somehow, but have read the whole thing with my morning coffee. They're all wonderful, but I thought Kermit especially beautiful. How wonderful that we have ways to track them now. It's even more wonderful that there are people willing to devote so much to helping them out. I have a friend here who is deeply involved with the manatees - as she says, with a smile, "I've grown closer to them than I am to most of my relatives." Thanks for a wonderful blog entry.
Member Since: October 4, 2004 Posts: 205 Comments: 15288
17. Willow13
2:12 AM GMT on August 10, 2008
I know what you mean, Breald! I cried, too. It's so amazing to have a turtle friend :)

Thank you, Sunrise from Germany, and thanks to all of you that have posted comments.

I haven't heard from Dylan since August 6, so please send her your best thoughts for safe travel and don't forget to click Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes, Cooking for Caretta caretta to put us in first place for most "hits".

For the Turtles,
Dorothy
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
16. breald
1:34 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
What a great story. I have tears in my eyes.
Member Since: May 28, 2008 Posts: 38 Comments: 5303
15. sunrise
1:24 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
Love this beauties and i wish them a long and safe life in the freedom of sea.
Have a good trip, Dylan and your turtle friends.
Thanks Dorothy for sharing the report with us.

Good luck from Germany
Member Since: July 30, 2003 Posts: 21 Comments: 48
14. Willow13
10:04 PM GMT on August 06, 2008
You are welcome and thank you for your kind words :)

For the Turtles,
Dorothy

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta
-Please click to keep us #1 - 100% of the profit from the sale of this cookbook goes to help the turtles :)
http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :)
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
13. ColoradoKat
3:47 AM GMT on August 06, 2008
Your blog warmed my heart! What marvelous
creatures and what wonderful people.
Thank you so much for sharing!!
Member Since: December 24, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4959
12. Willow13
3:29 AM GMT on August 06, 2008
Thank You So Much! I am so happy for Dylan!
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
11. CATAWIFE1
2:04 AM GMT on August 06, 2008
Thank you for sharing this, it was wonderful!!!
Member Since: September 13, 2006 Posts: 27 Comments: 1739
10. whitewabit (Mod)
1:54 AM GMT on August 06, 2008
Love the pictures and the work in returning these beautiful animals back into the wild...
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 361 Comments: 31280
9. catfuraplenty
7:13 AM GMT on June 30, 2008
Wonderful turtles and I love it that they eat my own personal saltwater menace, the jelly fish. :)

Thanks for posting this.
Member Since: May 7, 2006 Posts: 149 Comments: 3337
8. GardenGrrl
4:58 AM GMT on June 30, 2008
Hooray for the turtles!
Member Since: March 25, 2007 Posts: 250 Comments: 9337
7. Willow13
12:23 PM GMT on May 15, 2008
Thank You So Much :) The turtles thank you, too!

For the Turtles,

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta
- just clicking on the cookbook site helps the turtles! Also, 100% of the profit from the sale of this cookbook goes to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center.

http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :)
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
6. dragonflyF15
4:51 PM GMT on May 14, 2008
I love turtles and that was a really neat and inspiring blog. They are so beautiful!

Member Since: February 13, 2006 Posts: 193 Comments: 2151
4. Willow13
1:12 PM GMT on May 14, 2008
See Diamondback turtle hatchlings at the GEORGIA SEA TURTLE CENTER. click here => Link
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
3. Willow13
1:05 PM GMT on May 14, 2008
This is a photo of our former sign on the causeway. We now have new signs on the causeway. I'll try to get a photo today with my cell phone camera.
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719
2. auburn (Mod)
2:40 PM GMT on May 05, 2008
Very Cool...Thanks!
Member Since: August 27, 2006 Posts: 546 Comments: 50550
1. Willow13
11:44 AM GMT on May 05, 2008
The Georgia Sea Turtle Center did a WUNDERFUL job with the release of the three rehabilitated sea turtles :) There's always a great many people attending, so they were prepared for the crowd, and made sure everyone had a chance to bid farewell to these magnificent animals :) The signs they carried with their names printed were autographed by their loving fans!

For the Turtles,

Dorothy Lane Carswell, Writer/Editor
Jekyll Island's Treasured Recipes
Cooking for Caretta caretta

http://www.cookbooksforsale.com/displayCookbook.php?id=63760 -Please click to keep us #1
http://www.seaturtle.org/books/new/ Our cookbook featured :)
Member Since: September 16, 2003 Posts: 19 Comments: 2719

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