Why Vertical Instability has been low during 2011 North Atlantic Season

By: Tropicsweatherpr , 11:20 PM GMT on October 22, 2011

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As we have seen during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season,it has been not a normal season in terms of systems developing and mantaining for a longer time like some of those brief tropical storms that formed.But the question is what caused the dry air in the mid levels to be prevalent?
Vertical instability is obviously an atmospheric phenomenon. So wouldn't one expect that it would change very rapidly because the weather changes rapidly? Its not like sea surface temperature anomalies, which one would expect to remain fairly unchanged over the span of weeks or months (the high amount of energy it takes to heat or cool water). But the graph clearly shows that the vertical instability over both the Caribbean and Tropical Atlantic has been below average for the whole year. Could it be due to positions and intensities of pressure systems such as Bermuda high?

Let's have a good discussion about this.



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6. SPLbeater
3:49 PM GMT on November 18, 2011
i figured somethin was up when the storms would get large, then lose their intesity. Ophelia stayed relatively small, and she kept stregthening until wind shear got to her. Katia and Irene got really large, and lost their orginazation
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
5. Tropicsweatherpr
6:55 PM GMT on November 01, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
I think the extreme drought in both east Africa & TX/OK areas contributed. These haboobs that stir up with a front..when each one sweeps into the GOM instability zeros out.


That is a good point that you make about this.Let's see what occurs in the next few months and watch those areas.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 15368
4. Skyepony (Mod)
1:23 PM GMT on November 01, 2011
I think the extreme drought in both east Africa & TX/OK areas contributed. These haboobs that stir up with a front..when each one sweeps into the GOM instability zeros out.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 267 Comments: 40469
3. Ztapedoc
12:50 AM GMT on October 27, 2011
It is interesting in that recently I've noticed that cold fronts coming down from the US are penetrating all the way down to Cuba and Haiti. This is something that I thought was normal for later in mid-November.

Will we reach the Greek names? I don't think so, unless the western Caribbean/GOM starts getting active and there is no indication that is going to happen.

Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 22
2. Tropicsweatherpr
11:41 PM GMT on October 22, 2011
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I'm not entirely sure what has caused the Vertical Instability across the Atlantic basin to be so low, but I do know this: Vertical Instability has been the #1 reason why storms haven't lasted long, and why they haven't become strong.


Agree with that 100%.It has been for sure an unusual season.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 15368
1. TropicalAnalystwx13
11:32 PM GMT on October 22, 2011
I'm not entirely sure what has caused the Vertical Instability across the Atlantic basin to be so low, but I do know this: Vertical Instability has been the #1 reason why storms haven't lasted long, and why they haven't become strong.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 33583

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About Tropicsweatherpr

I am a tropical weather enthusiastic as I live on hurricane alley.

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