Total Lunar Eclipse in April

By: Susie77 , 12:32 PM GMT on March 31, 2014

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Total lunar eclipse for the Americas on night of April 14-15







Total lunar eclipse in 2004 by Fred Espenak


Tonight for April 14, 2014












The red planet Mars shines close to the full moon all night long.
The very bright red planet Mars shines close to the full moon on the night of the April 14-15 eclipse.
Above photo is a 2004 lunar eclipse by Fred Espenak.
Oftentimes, the full moon appears coppery red during a total lunar
eclipse because the dispersed light from all the Earth’s sunrises and
sunsets falls on the face of the moon. Thus the term Blood Moon
can be and is applied to any and all total lunar eclipses. However,
this term seems to have special significance in Christian culture in
2014, as a remarkable series of total lunar eclipses – a tetrad
– begins. The first one is April 14 or 15 (depending on your time
zone). On that night, the brilliant “star” near the April full moon is
the red planet Mars. They’ll be near each other as the eclipse takes
place, and indeed, as seen from around the world, all night long. North
America is in a good place to see this eclipse, by the way, and all
four eclipses of the lunar tetrad. Follow the links below to learn more
about the April 14-15, 2014 total lunar eclipse:
Details on the total lunar eclipse on April 14-15.
Who will see the partial lunar eclipse on April 14-15?
Eclipse times in Universal Time
Eclipse times for North American time zones
Eclipse calculators give eclipse times for your time zone
What causes a lunar eclipse?
What is a Blood Moon?
How to photograph a lunar eclipse by eclipse master Fred Espenak
Track the moon every night throughout the year using EarthSky’s lunar calendar!
Worldwide map of April 14-15, 2014, total lunar eclipse
Worldwide map of the April 14-15, 2014, total lunar eclipse. View larger, courtesy of NASA Eclipse Web Site
View larger.
| Worldwide map of the April 14-15, 2014, total lunar eclipse. Map courtesy NASA Eclipse Web Site
The moon passes through Earth's very light penumbral shadow before and after its journey across the dark umbral shadow
During
a lunar eclipse, the moon always passes through Earth’s very light
penumbral shadow before and after its journey through Earth’s dark
umbral shadow.
Details on the total lunar eclipse of April 14-15.
The April 2014 full moon passes directly through Earth’s dark (umbral)
shadow. The total part of the April 14-15 eclipse lasts nearly 1.3
hours. A partial umbral eclipse precedes totality by over an hour, and
follows totality by over an hour, so the moon takes a little more than
3.5 hours to completely sweep through the Earth’s dark shadow on the
night of April 14-15.
North and South America, plus islands of the Pacific (such as Hawaii)
are in the best position worldwide to watch the total eclipse of the
moon on the night of April 14-15. Elsewhere around the world, New
Zealand can watch the total eclipse shortly after sunset on April 15,
and the eastern part of Australia can see the total eclipse, at least in
part, starting at sunset on April 15.
A very light penumbral eclipse comes before and after the dark
(umbral) stage of the lunar eclipse. But this sort of eclipse is so
faint that many people won’t even notice it. The penumbral eclipse would
be more fun to watch from the moon, where it would be seen as a partial
eclipse of the sun.
Who will see the partial lunar eclipse of April 14-15?
A partial lunar eclipse may be visible in the haze of morning dawn
from the extreme western portion of Africa, before sunrise on April 15. A
partial lunar eclipse can also be observed from Japan, far-eastern
Russia, eastern Indonesia and central Australia, starting at sunset on
April 15.
The moon passes through the Earth's shadow from west to east. The yellow line represents the ecliptic- Earth's orbital plane projected onto the dome of sky. The moon crosses the ecliptic at the moon's ascending node, going from south to north.
On April 14-15, 2014, the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow from west to east. The yellow line represents the ecliptic-
Earth’s orbital plane projected onto the dome of sky. The moon crosses
the ecliptic at the moon’s ascending node, going from south to north.
Eclipse times in Universal Time
Partial umbral eclipse begins: 5:58 Universal Time (UT)

Total eclipse begins: 7:07 UT

Greatest eclipse: 7:46 UT

Total eclipse ends: 8:25 UT

Partial umbral eclipse ends: 9:33 UT
How do I translate Universal Time to my time?
Eclipse times for North American time zones.
Eastern Daylight Time (April 15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 1:58 a.m. EDT on April 15

Total eclipse begins: 3:07 a.m. EDT

Greatest eclipse: 3:46 a.m. EDT

Total eclipse ends: 4:25 a.m. EDT

Partial eclipse ends: 5:33 a.m. EDT
Central Daylight Time (April 15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 12:58 a.m. CDT on April 15

Total eclipse begins: 2:07 a.m. CDT

Greatest eclipse: 2:46 a.m. CDT

Total eclipse ends: 3:25 a.m. CDT

Partial eclipse ends: 4:33 a.m. CDT
Mountain Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 11:58 p.m. MDT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 1:07 a.m. MDT on April 15

Greatest eclipse: 1:46 a.m. EDT

Total eclipse ends: 2:25 a.m. EDT

Partial eclipse ends: 3:33 a.m. EDT
Pacific Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 10:58 p.m. PDT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 12:07 a.m. PDT on April 15

Greatest eclipse: 12:46 a.m. PDT

Total eclipse ends: 1:25 a.m. PDT

Partial eclipse ends: 2:33 a.m. PDT
Alaskan Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 9:58 p.m. ADT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 11:07 p.m. ADT on April 14

Greatest eclipse: 11:46 p.m. ADT on April 14

Total eclipse ends: 12:25 a.m. ADT on April 15

Partial eclipse ends: 1:33 a.m. ADT on April 15
Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time (April 14, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 7:58 p.m. HAST on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 9:07 p.m. HAST on April 14

Greatest eclipse: 9:46 p.m. HAST on April 14

Total eclipse ends: 10:25 p.m. HAST on April 14

Partial eclipse ends: 11:33 p.m. HAST on April 14
Eclipse calculators give times of the April 14-15 lunar eclipse in your time zone
You have to be on the nighttime side of Earth while the lunar eclipse
is taking place to witness this great natural phenomenon. Of course,
people around the globe want to know whether the eclipse is visible from
their part of the world and at what time. Check out the two links
below, to find out if the eclipse is visible from your neck of the
woods. If so, these handy sites provide you with the local times of the
partial and total lunar eclipse (so no conversion is necessary):
Lunar eclipse computer courtesy of the US Naval Observatory
Eclipse calculator courtesy of TimeandDate
The yellow circle shows the sun's apparent yearly path (the ecliptic) in front of the constellations of the Zodiac. The gray circle displays the monthly path of the moon in front of the zodiacal constellations. If a new moon or full moon aligns closely with one of the moon's nodes, then an eclipse is in the works.
The yellow circle shows the sun’s apparent yearly path (the ecliptic) in front of the constellations of the Zodiac.
The gray circle displays the monthly path of the moon in front of the
zodiacal constellations. If a new moon or full moon aligns closely with
one of the moon’s nodes, then an eclipse is in the works.
What causes a lunar eclipse? A
lunar eclipse can only happen at full moon. Only then is it possible
for the moon to be directly opposite the sun in our sky, and to pass
into the Earth’s dark umbral shadow. Most of the time, however, the full
moon eludes the Earth’s shadow by swinging to the north of it, or south
of it. For instance, the March 2014 full moon swung south of the Earth’s shadow. Next month – in May 2014 – the full moon will swing north of the Earth’s shadow.
The moon’s orbital plane is actually inclined at 5o to the ecliptic
– Earth’s orbital plane. However, the moon’s orbit intersects the
ecliptic at two points called nodes. It’s an ascending node where it
crosses the Earth’s orbital plane going from south to north, and a
descending node where it crosses the Earth’s orbital plane, going from
north to south.
In short, a lunar eclipse happens when the full moon closely
coincides with one of its nodes, and a solar eclipse happens when a new
moon does likewise.
Bottom line: The eclipse of April 14-15, 2014 is the first in a
series of four eclipses – a lunar tetrad – all of which will be visible
from North America. Many will call it a Blood Moon. The bright reddish
“star” near the moon on that night is the planet Mars. Details of the
eclipse, and eclipse times, here.

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Sometimes I complain about the earthly weather, but mostly I like to post about astronomy and space events. Hope you enjoy the articles.

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