Earth Weather / Space Weather

Fun with Google

By: Susie77, 3:57 PM GMT on August 30, 2006

Here's something weather-related... finally.... kinda.... Go to Google and type in Florida hurricanes. Look at the ads that pop up on the right of the results page. Did you know that you can buy a hurricane at Ebay? Wow. What will you do with *yours*? ;-)

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Aurora!

By: Susie77, 2:44 PM GMT on August 29, 2006

The last couple of nights have been busy for aurora viewers in the Fairbanks area. Here is a shot from the SALMON aurora cam from last night:



You can find the cam at:

SALMON Aurora Cam

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Vote for your favorite

By: Susie77, 4:40 PM GMT on August 28, 2006

Once again, nothing to do with weather per se, but still involves looking up.... kinda. ;)



Most Amazing Galactic Images

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Rain again!

By: Susie77, 5:49 PM GMT on August 27, 2006

Woke up to the sounds of something going clink clink clink -- instantly thought one of the parrots had escaped during the night and was eating the house. But it was rain on the exhaust vent in the bathroom -- been so long had forgotten what it sounded like. Sounds good!

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Rain!

By: Susie77, 2:59 PM GMT on August 26, 2006

Ooooh, an inch in the gauge this morning! Thank you, gods.

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Milky Way

By: Susie77, 5:58 PM GMT on August 25, 2006

Sometimes I get tired of earthly weather and focus on the night skies instead. This article discusses the lovely Milky Way and why this time of year is good for viewing it. At the bottom there are some great links that explain astronomy in terms that even I can understand.


Summer Milky Way

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Goodbye, Pluto

By: Susie77, 2:16 PM GMT on August 24, 2006

He's been demoted....


Pluto No Longer a Planet

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Back to school

By: Susie77, 2:58 PM GMT on August 23, 2006

Yay, the kids went back to school this week! No more messes to clean up around the house! No more expensive snacks added to the grocery list! No more thumping around while I'm trying to sleep! I LOVE school!

PS--Mine are 19 and 20 -- lol -- yours? ;-)

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Cool Predator

By: Susie77, 8:30 PM GMT on August 19, 2006

Found this wicked lady lurking in one of the houseplants by the front door.... who needs bug spray when you have friends like this? :-)

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Aurora cams

By: Susie77, 3:50 PM GMT on August 18, 2006

Here's a couple of aurora cams for those of us who can't see the Lights from our locales:


Salmon River cam


Aurora Cam


Both of these cameras are located near Fairbanks, inside the auroral oval.

Updated: 5:45 PM GMT on August 18, 2006

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Incoming Geomag Storm

By: Susie77, 4:58 AM GMT on August 18, 2006

MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY WATCH
Issued: 19:30 UTC on 17 August 2006
Solar Terrestrial Dispatch
www.spacew.com


VALID BEGINNING AT: 21:00 UTC ON 18 AUGUST
VALID UNTIL: 24:00 UTC (6 pm EDT) ON 20 AUGUST

HIGH RISK PERIOD: 19 AUGUST (UTC DAYS)
MODERATE RISK PERIOD: 18-21 AUGUST

PREDICTED ACTIVITY INDICES: 8, 30, 20, 12 (18 AUG - 21 AUG)

POTENTIAL MAGNITUDE OF MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY: MODERATE

POTENTIAL DURATION OF THIS ACTIVITY: MAIN BELT = 12-18 HOURS
MINOR BELT = 18-24 HOURS

ESTIMATED OPTIMUM OBSERVING CONDITIONS: NEAR / PRIOR TO LOCAL MIDNIGHT

EXPECTED LUNAR INTERFERENCE: NIL TO LOW

OVERALL OPPORTUNITY FOR OBSERVATIONS FROM MIDDLE LATITUDES: FAIR

AURORAL ACTIVITY *MAY* BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM...
(THIS LINE IS VALID *ONLY* IF FAVORABLE STORM CONDITIONS OCCUR)

SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA TO IDAHO TO MONTANA TO SOUTH DAKOTA TO MINNESOTA
TO WISCONSIN TO MICHIGAN TO DARK-SKY SITES OF NEW YORK TO MAINE.

ACTIVITY *MAY* ALSO BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM...
(THIS LINE IS VALID *ONLY* IF FAVORABLE STORM CONDITIONS OCCUR)

SCOTLAND TO DENMARK TO NORWAY TO SOUTHERN SWEDEN TO FINLAND TO NORTHERN
RUSSIA.

SOUTHERN NEW ZEALAND MAY ALSO SPOT PERIODS OF ACTIVITY.

SYNOPSIS...

A minor solar flare associated coronal mass ejection (CME) is currently
enroute to the Earth. Impact is expected early on the 19th (UTC time, or late
evening / early morning hours of the 18th / 19th over North America). This
disturbance has the potential to produce periods of moderately strong auroral
activity over the high and upper middle latitude regions. Observations of
activity into the central mid-latitudes is less likely, but still notably
possible. The CME is expected to have swept up the heliospheric current
sheet, which will complicate the interaction that occurs with the Earth's
magnetic field when it arrives. As a result, it is a more difficult to
estimate the strength of the disturbance prior to its arrival. Periods of
minor to perhaps weak major auroral storming will be possible after the
disturbance arrives. At the present time, best estimates place it's arrival
sometime between approximately 00 UTC and 12 UTC on 19 August, with a central
estimate near 05 GMT.

This watch will remain valid through 24:00 UTC (6 pm EDT) on
20 August. It will be updated or allowed to expire at that time. For updated
information, visit: http://www.spacew.com/aurora/forum.html. For real-time
plots of current activity, visit: http://www.spacew.com/plots.html

PLEASE REPORT VALID OBSERVATIONS OF AURORAL ACTIVITY TO:
http://www.spacew.com/submitsighting.html


** End of Watch **

_______________________________________________
Aurorawatch mailing list
Aurorawatch@spacew.com
http://spacew.com/mailman/listinfo/aurorawatch

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Geomag storm!!!

By: Susie77, 6:34 PM GMT on August 17, 2006

This just into our space weather desk.....


"AURORA WATCH: An explosion on the sun yesterday (Aug. 16) hurled a coronal mass ejection (CME) toward Earth. The approaching cloud could spark a geomagnetic storm when it arrives, probably on August 18th. Sky watchers should be alert for auroras.


If a storm erupts, the best displays will be at higher latitudes: e.g., Alaska, Canada, and Scandinavia. However, auroras could descend to lower latitudes, too, spreading across northern-tier US states from Maine to Washington and elsewhere."



Space Weather

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More Planets????

By: Susie77, 7:31 PM GMT on August 16, 2006

We might have to change all the sky charts, representations of the solar system, etc. if this goes through ... twelve planets instead of nine, maybe more! Ah, science!

Twelve Planets?

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Summer Comes Inside

By: Susie77, 6:18 PM GMT on August 16, 2006

Weeds make a bouquet even lovelier, don't they?

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Solar Cycle

By: Susie77, 10:37 PM GMT on August 15, 2006

We're currently at the minimum point in the solar cycle... but there are signs that things are about to change!


Backwards Sunspot


We will get to see things like this during solar max.......




From (Shameless Plug Alert):


Photosymphony Productions

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Sun and Moon

By: Susie77, 3:58 PM GMT on August 15, 2006

Taken this morning....


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Awesome photography

By: Susie77, 5:14 AM GMT on August 15, 2006

Ran across this while looking at the forecast.... isn't it beautiful? What a shot.

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Rain

By: Susie77, 2:48 PM GMT on August 14, 2006

Half an inch in the rain gauge this morning -- whoo hoo! Looks like more on the way. I asked Koko to sing us a rain song the other day -- he's done well, hasn't he?

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Boomers!

By: Susie77, 4:53 AM GMT on August 14, 2006

Awesome lightning show on the way home from work tonight -- was surprised when I checked the radar to see how far away the closest storms were. Here's hoping for a good long rain tonight!

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First Signs of Fall

By: Susie77, 3:14 PM GMT on August 12, 2006

I've noticed a couple already -- the black birds have reunited into big flocks again (they separate into pairs during the breeding season). The monarchs are migrating. And Walmart has had back to school crap out for 3 wks. now.

Anyone else have any signs?

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Some late night humor

By: Susie77, 4:17 AM GMT on August 11, 2006

I know this isn't in the least bit weather-related, but it's just too freaking hilarious not to share. I personally dislike romance novels so found this site even funnier -- but even if you like them, you can't help but laugh. ;)

Romance Novels Parody

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Weather groupies

By: Susie77, 6:48 PM GMT on August 10, 2006

So what got you into liking weather so much you read blogs about it? ;)


My mom was terrified of storms. She would make us hide under the dining room table when a storm came up (no basement where we used to live in Tornado Alley, Ohio). I got my butt smacked but good for taking my little sister out strolling in a severe t-storm when I was 5 and she was 2. Funny how things you were taught to fear as a child can become a lifelong fascination instead! Now when a storm rolls through, am out there reveling in it. My dream vacation would be to go storm-chasing... too bad it costs so much and of course no guarantee you'll see a twister, let alone anything but cows n corn.

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Wanna see my cracks?

By: Susie77, 6:16 PM GMT on August 09, 2006

No, not those ones, and get yer mind outta the gutter!


We're over 9 inches behind in rainfall for the year. My poor, poor yard...... If you look closely, you can see little China people waving back at you.....







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Today's Holidays From Around the World

By: Susie77, 4:35 PM GMT on August 08, 2006

From GrannyMoon's Morning Feast:


"Ancient Romans celebrate the Eve of the FESTIVAL OF VENUS. The goddess of love & beauty is honored & invoked with prayers, love songs, libations, & passionate night-time lovemaking.


"Scotland: BURRYMAN FESTIVAL. A man in tight-knit suit & mask is covered from head to toe with burrs & strolls the streets of Linlithgow, collecting tribute from housewives. No one knows why.


"Pennsylvania, US: SNEAK SOME ZUCCHINI ONTO YOUR NEIGHBORS' PORCH NIGHT. Everyone knows why."


Hmmm, I think I begin to see where we got the stereotype of Italians as romantic, passionate people -- and the Scots as crabby dour people.... LOL.


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August Meteors

By: Susie77, 5:01 AM GMT on August 08, 2006

The full moon will be washing out the Perseids this year.... but we might get to see some 'earthgrazers'. They are actually better than 'regular' meteors -- longer, brighter, spectacular! (I saw the Leonid earthgrazers in 2000.) For more info, go here:


Viewing the Perseids

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Dog Days of August

By: Susie77, 6:08 PM GMT on August 07, 2006

Dog Days/Doyo - The Japanese call these the Dog Days, the most dangerous time of the year because of the heat which brings with it vermin and illness. The best way to stay healthy during this time is to eat lots of eels, whose slippery coolness is the proper antidote. -- Rufus, Anneli, The World Holiday Book, Harper San Francisco 1994



I am herewith donating all my eels to you so that you can stay cool and free from vermin. ;-)

Updated: 5:02 AM GMT on August 08, 2006

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Why I Garden

By: Susie77, 6:19 PM GMT on August 05, 2006

Swallowtail on zinnias.


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August Folklore

By: Susie77, 6:27 AM GMT on August 04, 2006

From GrannyMoon:

"At this time of the year, the star Vega (known to the Chinese as the Maiden) seems to cross the Milky Way (which the Chinese called the Bridge of Magpies) and join the star Altair (known as the Cowherd). The myth which explains these stellar movements tells about how the Cowherd and the Maiden were going to be wed. She was so happy she stopped weaving. The Sun-God ordered a flock of magpies to bridge the Heavenly River and ordered the Cowherd to cross to the other side. Now the two only meet once a year on this day, when the Magpies form a bridge for the Maiden to cross. But she cannot do so if it rains, so women pray for clear skies. They also ask the Maiden for skill in needlework and make offerings to her of cakes and watermelons."

[The author of this blog also gladly accepts offerings of watermelon and cake.]

The August night sky is also a time to see the annual Perseid meteor shower. What a wonderful time of year to haul a blanket outside well after dark, annoint yourself with bug repellant, lay back and gaze upon the majesty of the summer night sky! Even though August has just begun, in just a little while watching the night heavens, you can see a meteor streak by. For more on observing the Perseids shower, which peaks this year on 12 August, Sky and Telescope offers this advice:
The Perseids


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August Weather Lore

By: Susie77, 5:29 PM GMT on August 02, 2006

August brings the sheaves of corn; Then the harvest home is borne
...
Drie August and warm,
Doth harvest no harme
...
If the first week in August is unusually warm,
the coming Winter will be snowy and long.
...
For every fog in August,
There will be a snowfall in Winter.
...
If a cold August follows a hot July,
It foretells a Winter hard and dry
...
If corn husks are thicker than usual, a cold winter lies ahead.
Courtesy GrannyMoon's Morning Feast

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Lammas

By: Susie77, 4:55 PM GMT on August 01, 2006

Merry Lammas, all. May you have a bountiful 'second harvest' this first day of August.

From GrannyMoon's daily feast:
"The Greeks honor the first three days of August as a transition point in the year. Proverbs such as "August has come--the first step of winter," and "Winter begins in August, summer in March," reflect the sense of change which occurs on this quarter-day."

We can perceive the change in daylight now from solstice in June -- the sun is setting earlier, we are approaching fall.

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About Susie77

Sometimes I complain about the earthly weather, but mostly I like to post about astronomy and space events. Hope you enjoy the articles.

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