Are the changes in the Arctic messing with our weather? Analysis

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 9:20 PM GMT on January 26, 2014

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Are the changes in the Arctic messing with our weather? Analysis

In the last blog, I promised an analysis of why I conclude that what is happening in the Arctic makes it to my list of the big-ticket items of the past year.

I want to start with the work of Jennifer Francis and her collaborators. Professor Francis gave an excellent seminar in my department last week, which can be viewed here. This seminar uses as a foundation the paper Francis and Vavrus (2012), Evidence linking Arctic amplification to extreme weather in mid-latitudes. There is a whole set of coherent and convergent evidence that documents the changes in the Arctic. There is an increase in temperature, which is much greater in the Arctic than at lower latitudes and in the tropics (Polar or Arctic amplification). This has led to large changes in Arctic sea ice and springtime snow cover. There has been a lengthening of the growing season and an increase in activity in the northern forests – the greening of the Arctic (200 blogs ago, Getting Ready for Spring 5).

In the past, roughly, 15 years, there has been an observed change in the of the Arctic sea-level atmospheric pressure (see previous blog). The pressure is slightly higher, which leads to a weakening of the stream of air that flows around the North Pole. I wrote a tutorial about this in Wobbles in the Barrier. Also in the past decade there have been a number of researchers, for example, Liu et al. (2012) who in Impact of declining Arctic sea ice on winter snowfall – noted circulation patterns that have “ … some resemblance to the negative phase of the winter Arctic oscillation. However, the atmospheric circulation change linked to the reduction of sea ice shows much broader meridional meanders in midlatitudes and clearly different interannual variability than the classical Arctic oscillation.”

These papers lead to a few questions. Are the changes in the Arctic sea-level pressure a direct consequence of local changes in the Arctic, or are they more closely related to changes in global circulation patterns? Are changes in the Arctic sea-level pressure causing changes in weather in the middle latitudes? Are the differences we have seen in the past 15 years indicative of a climate-change related differences in weather patterns? Is what we have traditionally called the Arctic Oscillation changing?

Trenberth and Fasullo are following the heat of the warming earth, with the primary goal of understanding of how much heat is contributing to warming the Earth’s surface air temperature versus how much is going to heating the ocean and melting ice and snow. Their focus is on approximately the past 15 years. Therefore, they pay attention to known ways that the atmosphere and ocean vary (Some previous tutorials: Still Following the Heat and Ocean, Atmosphere, Ice and Land). Trenberth and Fasullo document the strong influence of the 1997-1998 El Nino. El Nino typically has a large effect on global temperature. The 1997-1998 El Nino was especially large. Trenberth and Fasullo show that the temperature in the atmosphere and oceans still remembers the 1997-1998 El Nino. They also examine the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which is characterized by sea surface temperature differences being above (or below) average in the north-central Pacific while they are below (or above) in the north and east Pacific near the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf of Alaska. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation has been in a pattern of being cooler than average in the north and east Pacific since the 1997-1998 El Nino. Trenberth and Fasullo document a pattern that spans the globe, and the changes in the Arctic are part of that pattern. Conversely, their analysis would suggest that the global aspects of circulation pattern are too large to be caused by changes in the Arctic – it just takes too much energy.

What might be a scientifically based difference between whether changes in the Arctic are part of a global pattern or caused by the loss of sea ice changing the absorption and reflection of solar energy is to some extent not relevant to the question about weather patterns over the U.S. My experience in scientific controversies of this nature is that there are usually both global and local pieces to the puzzle. Further, changes in the U.S. weather could be directly linked to changes in the Arctic as well as to global patterns. In both the Trenberth and Fasullo and the Francis and Vavrus (2012) analysis there are consequential changes in jet stream pattern which is strongly influential to weather in the U.S. and, in fact, all of the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

It’s not surprising that changes in the polar jet stream, the river of air that meanders around the North Pole, would have a profound effect on weather in the U.S. The waves that make up the weather systems of winter storms, for example, draw their energy from the environment that forms the jet stream. The jet stream steers these storms. In classes on dynamical meteorology, students learn that what is going on at the jet stream is often better information for forecasting weather than what is going on at the surface. Though there is a direct link between the jet stream and weather systems, the path of cause and effect in the changes in the Arctic, changes in the jet stream and changes to extreme events in the U.S. is not easy to map.

We have seen observations from Francis and Vavrus and Liu et al. (2012) that suggest large meanders in the jet stream. Both of these papers suggest that the scale of these meanders is unprecedented and does not fit easily into the framework we have used historically to describe the Arctic Oscillation - the primary way we describe correlated variability between the Arctic and the middle latitudes. In addition to the Arctic Oscillation, another characteristic we use to describe mid-latitude weather is blocking. Blocking describes a pattern of atmospheric flow, perhaps a particular configuration of the jet stream. Blocking slows or stops the normal west-to-east movement of storms around the Earth. Here is a nice description of blocking. Blocking is most common with high pressure, and high pressure is associated with the northern meanders of the jet stream. Note, blocking is associated with the meanders in the jet stream, but large meanders do not always mean that our definition of “block” is fulfilled. Blocking patterns are difficult to predict on a case-by-case basis. Blocking patterns are known to be associated with droughts, floods, heat waves and cold snaps. Therefore, when we look to a way that changes in the jet stream might change the weather over the U.S. we logically look a changes in blocking, which will discussed more fully in next blog.

r

Cold Weather in Denver: Climate Change and Arctic Oscillation (8)

Climate Change and the Arctic Oscillation 2

Climate Change and the Arctic Oscillation 1

Wobbles in the Barriers

Barriers in the Atmosphere

Behavior

Definitions and Some Background

August Arctic Oscillation presentation

CPC Climate Glossary “The Arctic Oscillation is a pattern in which atmospheric pressure at polar and middle latitudes fluctuates between negative and positive phases.”





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Quoting 339. overwash12:
Climate will change whether man is here or not. Always has and always will. Subtle changes in Sun's output and we go up or down,dramatically. We may contribute some,but then again,we probably always will.
I'm just curious. Is there anything - any event or any research - that would persuade you that AGW is real, is caused by all the CO2 mankind is putting into the air, and will have very serious consequences ? If so, what is that event or research r discovery?

Thanks.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 341. FLwolverine:
The explanation may be in the second paragraph of the executive summary:

"Global mean surface temperatures rose rapidly from the 1970s, but there has been little further warming over the most recent 10 to 15 years to 2013. This has prompted speculation that human induced global warming is no longer happening, or at least will be much smaller than predicted. Others maintain that this is a temporary pause and that temperatures will again rise at rates seen previously."

This report seems like a rebuttal to the "if you can't explain the pause....." crowd of deniers.

I think that that job should be beneath the dignity of the Met Office.

And I will note that "little additional warming" is not the same thing as a "pause".
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 340. Birthmark:

Only your first sentence is really true...and even it is irrelevant.

The Sun's output at the latest minimum was the lowest in over one hundred years, yet we're still warming. The maximum is pathetic, yet we're still warming. In fact, solar output generally was declining while the temperature was increasing rapidly. The Sun isn't responsible for the current warming.
I thought Yoboi cleared that up about the no warming debate? LOL
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Quoting 333. Birthmark:
....... I'm still at a loss as to why they bother to "explain" it since it is over an insignificant time period.
The explanation may be in the second paragraph of the executive summary:

"Global mean surface temperatures rose rapidly from the 1970s, but there has been little further warming over the most recent 10 to 15 years to 2013. This has prompted speculation that human induced global warming is no longer happening, or at least will be much smaller than predicted. Others maintain that this is a temporary pause and that temperatures will again rise at rates seen previously."

This report seems like a rebuttal to the "if you can't explain the pause....." crowd of deniers.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 339. overwash12:
Climate will change whether man is here or not. Always has and always will. Subtle changes in Sun's output and we go up or down,dramatically. We may contribute some,but then again,we probably always will.

Only your first sentence is really true...and even it is irrelevant.

The Sun's output at the latest minimum was the lowest in over one hundred years, yet we're still warming. The maximum is pathetic, yet we're still warming. In fact, solar output generally was declining while the temperature was increasing rapidly. The Sun isn't responsible for the current warming.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 338. NYBizBee:


Little by little these once in 20 year storms are every year or two now, very real that we are past thinking a change in climate is not happening. We have changed and continue to.
Climate will change whether man is here or not. Always has and always will. Subtle changes in Sun's output and we go up or down,dramatically. We may contribute some,but then again,we probably always will.
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Quoting 336. Birthmark:

But we won't keep our current climate very much longer.


Little by little these once in 20 year storms are every year or two now, very real that we are past thinking a change in climate is not happening. We have changed and continue to.
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337. yoboi
Quoting 302. Birthmark:

Let me ask why you posted that, if I may? I have a suspicion that I'd like to confirm or eliminate. Thanks.


Just trying to educate the world.....
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2442
Quoting 335. overwash12:
If it happens in Aug. we would be in trouble,Bigtime. No produce,we will be fine with our current climate!

But we won't keep our current climate very much longer.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 334. Birthmark:

Again, when it does that in August you might (or might not) have something. Otherwise...happy winter!
If it happens in Aug. we would be in trouble,Bigtime. No produce,we will be fine with our current climate!
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Quoting 330. overwash12:
It paused at my house,21 degrees with 8" of snow!LOL

Again, when it does that in August you might (or might not) have something. Otherwise...happy winter!
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 331. Physicistretired:


Cochise didn't bother to read his own link, Birthmark. S/he only read the title.

Well, it repeats "pause" in the report, but I can't find a pause anywhere in the data or the report --aside from a claim of a pause. They then go through a laundry list of possible contributing factors, none of which are a surprise to anyone.

It appears to be a report for the sake of a report.

EDIT: After going through the actual data (elsewhere), I've found their "pause." I'm still at a loss as to why they bother to "explain" it since it is over an insignificant time period. I mean, why not start in late 2007 and explain the return of rapid temperature increase?

From 2007.8 to present:
GISTEMP Trend: 0.141 0.485 C/decade (2%u03C3)
NOAA Trend: 0.129 0.475 C/decade (2%u03C3)
HADCRUT4 Trend: 0.104 0.440 C/decade (2%u03C3)
RSS Trend: 0.158 0.941 C/decade (2%u03C3)
UAH Trend: 0.288 0.945 C/decade (2%u03C3)

Looks like the "pause" ended in late 2007, no?
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 317. Cochise111:
For those of you on this blog who continue to deny that there has been no warming for at least 15 years, here's a paper from the UK Met office. How will you spin this? The spin in semantics has already begun with warmists calling the cessation in warming a "pause," but since warmists' climate models have been almost 100% wrong in predicting "climate change", how do we know that the extremely little amount of warming that occurred prior to the "pause" has not halted completely?

Link



For the thousandth time, SURFACE temps. If you ignore the ocean you are cherry picking. All the data sets show increase in SURFACE temperature, just not significant at the 95% level, but you wouldn't get that anyways since you are using 15 years.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3688
Quoting 328. Birthmark:

What pause would that be? lol


Cochise didn't bother to read his own link, Birthmark. S/he only read the title.
Member Since: December 21, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 231
Quoting 328. Birthmark:

What pause would that be? lol
It paused at my house,21 degrees with 8" of snow!LOL
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Quoting 325. FLwolverine:
Remember, "we the people" elect those guys.
I have a gut feeling that is not happening.
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Quoting 317. Cochise111:

What pause would that be? lol
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 325. FLwolverine:
Remember, "we the people" elect those guys.
Yeap,then the big corporations do em' in!
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Quoting 321. cyclonebuster:


Why is Alaska hotter than Alabama now?


Pine beetles?
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Quoting 322. overwash12:
Almost all politicians are hypocrites,I have no use for them. Except to waste my tax money!
Remember, "we the people" elect those guys.
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Quoting 321. cyclonebuster:


Why is Alaska hotter than Alabama now?
JETSTREAM!
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Quoting 309. BaltimoreBrian:
No results found for gore "I used to believe in democracy".

What a lying piece of crap that link is.
You expected more from the Heartland Institute?

No, I didn't think you did.
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Quoting 318. Cochise111:


More likely billions, while he has a mansion in Tennessee that uses more than $2500 a month in electricity and another $8.5 million dollar home in Montecito, CA. Can you say "hypocrite"?
Almost all politicians are hypocrites,I have no use for them. Except to waste my tax money!
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Quoting 304. iceagecoming:
Deep South Deep Freeze: Buses sent to pick up stranded motorists
By Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN
updated 2:21 AM EST, Wed January 29, 2014




STORY HIGHLIGHTS

NEW: 4,500 students will spend the night in Hoover, Alabama, schools
NEW: Atlanta's mayor urges drivers to stay off streets for 24 hours
NEW: More than 3,200 flights have been canceled, FlightAware says
At least 5 were killed in weather-related traffic accidents in Alabam
a


Strangely no mention of global warming or climate change !!!





Are you affected by the frigid weather? Send CNN iReport your photos and video of ice, snow and sleet if you can do so safely.






Atlanta (CNN) -- [Breaking news update 2:23 a.m. ET Wednesday]

(CNN) -- Officials in Hoover, Alabama, were sending buses early Wednesday morning to pick up stranded motorists.

In the first run, two school buses were sent to transport as many as 100 people to local shelters, said Rusty Lowe of the Hoover fire department.

The buses will make several runs.

[Breaking news update 1:08 a.m. ET Wednesday]




About 50 Atlanta school children were still stuck on buses early Wednesday morning.

The students had gotten on buses to get home shortly after noon Tuesday, but treacherous road conditions coupled with gridlocked traffic has made it impossible.

Kimberly Willis Green, spokeswoman for Atlanta Public Schools, said she did not have an estimate on the number of children stuck in Atlanta schools overnight.

Atlanta-based Home Depot opened up 26 stores in Alabama and Georgia for stranded travelers.

Spokesman Stephen Holmes said some of those who sought shelter spent time watching movies in store break rooms.

"At one store, they even opened up an indoor garden area to be a quiet area to open for reading," he said.

[Last update 10:37 p.m. ET Tuesday]

Ice and snow bring chaotic commutes to much of South

(CNN) -- Cars stuck in ditches beside icy roads. Thousands of children stranded at schools that parents can't reach. Drivers camped out at gas stations with no way to get home.

As a winter storm slammed into a broad swath of the South on Tuesday, authorities warned drivers to stay off the streets.

"This is a very dangerous situation," Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said. "People need to stay at home. They need to stay there until conditions improve."

Motorists in major metropolitan areas including Atlanta sat trapped in gridlock as schools and offices shut down, unleashing hordes of vehicles onto slushy roadways.

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed urged residents to stop driving for at least a day to give crews a chance to clean up.

"The next 24 hours, I really need folks to stay home," he told CNN affiliate WSB. "Go home, give us some time."

While Northerners may laugh at their Southern friends' panic over a dusting of snow, the threat is real: With relatively few resources to battle snow and ice, public works crews may have a difficult time keeping up with any significant accumulation.
Students get snow day, start snow fight
Cold air pummels parts of the country
Wind chills hit 40 below
Rare snow phenomenon rolls up in Ohio
More freezing temperatures!

Add to that the fact that millions of Southern drivers aren't used to driving on snow or ice, and things got messy -- fast.

Snowflakes like you've never seen them before

Students stuck at schools

In Alabama, where freezing rain made driving perilous, at least five people were killed in weather-related traffic accidents Tuesday, state Department of Public Safety spokesman Sgt. Steve Jarrett said.

Bentley declared a state of emergency and said he had activated 350 National Guard troops to help respond to the storm. Emergency officials warned drivers to stay off the roads and urged people stuck in their cars to stay inside.

"The weather right now, the temperatures and the wind chill, if you step out of your car, are very dangerous," said Art Faulkner, the state's director of emergency management.

In Birmingham, Melanie Wilson tried to drive after she got a message that her children's school was closing Tuesday morning.

"Immediately, I almost had an accident," she said. "The school buses were at the bottom of our hill and you could tell the drivers were not sure they should try to make it up the hill. We're not sure where the ball was dropped. We heard it was going to be a light dusting with little accumulation."

She ditched her car after it spun out on a steep hill, and trudged through the snow to pick up her children and make it home safely.

"The children enjoyed it," she said. "It was beautiful, a winter wonderland. It was lovely except for worrying about everybody else who can't get home to their families."

Governor: Teachers will take care of kids

The severe weather has forced 4,500 students to spend the night in various school buildings in Hoover, Alabama. And there were 800 students stuck in schools in Birmingham, Alabama, officials said.

"Staff is staying with them, feeding them," Birmingham City Schools Superintendent Craig Witherspoon said. "High schools are showing movies."

Bentley urged parents who are unable to reach their children to remain calm.

"I know the anxiety there," he said. "I want to reassure all the parents that if you trust your teacher to take care of your child during the day, they will be taken care of tonight."

At the Alabama Waldorf School, about 20 students were spending the night at a nearby home late Tuesday after state officials urged parents not to drive in the snow.

"They're doing really well," Administrator Lisa Grupe said. "They're just having an extended play date. ... We all looked like ducks walking in the snow together."

On Twitter, a second-grade teacher said there were still about 150 students and 50 staff members stranded at Greystone Elementary School in Hoover, Alabama, because of "horrible" road conditions there.

Not that they were all complaining.

"Very exciting day," teacher Carol McLaughlin tweeted late Tuesday afternoon. "... The kids are being real troopers. : ) I think they think it's an adventure." McLaughlin, even posted a picture of some kids out playing in the snow.

Traffic gridlock traps motorists

In the Atlanta suburbs, school buses were stuck in traffic for hours. Hundreds of students were stranded at schools waiting for their parents to pick them up.

Commutes that normally take minutes became nightmarish treks that lasted for hours.

CNN affiliate WSB captured dramatic footage of parents reuniting with children after being stuck on a school bus for hours.

In downtown Atlanta, streets were clogged as cars became trapped in gridlock after at least an inch of snow had fallen.

"Government, schools, and business closing at the same time and releasing everybody out into the city was a mistake that we all were a part of," Reed told WSB.

For one stranded motorist -- it really was a situation of life and death.

Police in the Atlanta suburb of Sandy Springs said an officer helped a woman give birth on the side of Interstate 285.

Traffic jams on snow-covered roads had stopped the woman from making it to the hospital and blocked paramedics from reaching her.

That's when a police officer stepped in, helping deliver the baby girl Tuesday evening, Capt. Steve Rose said.

As snow, sleet and freezing rain pelted much of the state, authorities warned of dangerous driving conditions and said the roads would likely get worse. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency as the storm hit.

"I'm about to lose my mind, literally," one woman trapped in traffic told WSB. "It's horrible."

Mhari Patterson tried to make the 10-mile commute to her home outside Atlanta, but gave up after six hours, when she arrived at a RaceTrac gas station parking lot. There were about 80 other cars waiting out the storm there, she said.

"All of the area roads are frozen," she said. "There is no way to get home."

Until things clear up, Patterson said she planned to spend the night at the gas station.

Airlines cancel flights

The storms also snarled air travel across the country.

Airlines on Tuesday canceled more than 3,100 flights within, into or out of the United States, with hundreds each at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Houston's George Bush International Airport, Chicago O'Hare International Airport and Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, according to FlightAware.com, which tracks cancellations due to both weather and mechanical problems.

It wasn't just the South shuddering. Midwesterners and others more accustomed to bitter weather are, too.

All told, about 140 million people in 34 states were under some sort of winter weather warning or advisory, from snow and ice to bitterly cold wind chills, according to CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller.

Sleet and freezing rain began falling early Tuesday in East Texas, which along with Louisiana, was the first area to be affected by the winter storm.

"This town is shutting down," New Orleans cab driver August Delaney said.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu declared a state of emergency and warned residents to stay off the roads.

Robert Latham, the state's emergency management director, warned residents to expect power outages as well.

"We're looking at a part of the state that has a large number of pine trees," Latham said. "I can tell you that as ice accumulates on pine trees, limbs will break. Trees will fall. Power will be out."

A rough commute

It usually takes Krystle Venuti Moore 10 minutes to drive home from her job at a mall in Kennesaw, Georgia. On Tuesday, it took her five hours, even though there wasn't much snow.

It's quite a change from how storms were handled in her native New Hampshire, where she lived until she was 15.

"My family thinks it's hilarious," she said.

There was one perk in the lengthy commute: "watching the community and people helping each other out."

She saw high school students on ATVs offering rides to stranded motorists. And someone pushed her car when it got stuck.

But it wasn't all positive. She saw drivers foul up traffic as they spun out after driving too fast, and even when she got close to home, she had to park a mile away and walk.

The worst part?

Normally in five hours, "I could have driven to Florida," she said, "someplace warm."


Unfortunately this is what is in store.


Deep Freeze Recap: Coldest Temperatures of the Century for Some - weather.com








Why is Alaska hotter than Alabama now?
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20427
Quoting 317. Cochise111:
For those of you on this blog who continue to deny that there has been no warming for at least 15 years, here's a paper from the UK Met office. How will you spin this? The spin in semantics has already begun with warmists calling the cessation in warming a "pause," but since warmists' climate models have been almost 100% wrong in predicting "climate change", how do we know that the extremely little amount of warming that occurred prior to the "pause" has not halted completely?

Link
Just how many times do you plan to ask this same question? The answer isn't going to change. Surface warming hasn't climbed as fast over the past decade and a half because that heat is being buried at sea. And there it sits...

But I'll tell you what: how about you put your money where your mouth is? Now, the next El Nino will see the release of some of that sequestered oceanic heat back to the atmosphere, leading to what I believe will be--probably by a substantial margin--the warmest year ever recorded on the planet. If, as you claim, scientists are wrong and that heat isn't being stored, the next El Nino will be no different than others we've had in the past, probably not even as warm as the 98 event. Given that, you should have no problem backing up that claim with a few dollars, right? So what do you say? $500? $1,000? $10,000? The next year recognized as an El Nino one by NOAA will be the warmest year every measured on the planet.

Deal?
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Quoting 318. Cochise111:


More likely billions, while he has a mansion in Tennessee that uses more than $2500 a month in electricity and another $8.5 million dollar home in Montecito, CA. Can you say "hypocrite"?


Surprised you didn't say 'he has a beach front house, which proves he doesn't believe sea levels are rising'.

One of my fav denier inanities, that one.
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Quoting 313. ColoradoBob1:
”This winter, we’ve experienced a 20 year cold snap for the US. The Arctic is now experiencing a 44,000 year heat wave”

—Robertscribbler



Average summer temperatures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic during the last 100 years are higher now than during any century in the past 44,000 years….

Since radiocarbon dating is only accurate to about 50,000 years and because Earth’s geological record shows it was in a glaciation stage prior to that time, the indications are that Canadian Arctic temperatures today have not been matched or exceeded for roughly 120,000 years, Miller said.

“The key piece here is just how unprecedented the warming of Arctic Canada is,” said Miller…. “This study really says the warming we are seeing is outside any kind of known natural variability, and it has to be due to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.”


Link
Member Since: August 13, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2783
Polar Vortex Ripped in Half by Anomalous Jet Stream, High Arctic Experiencing 32 Degree F Above Average Temperatures Over Broad Region

Link
Member Since: August 13, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2783
DaveFive,

Modifying a comment is tricking on this blog. I often have similar issues.

This is what I do: when reposting a modified comment, I insert additional hard returns between each paragraph, and the hit 'Submit'. That seems to do the trick for me.

Hope that helps.
Member Since: December 21, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 231
”This winter, we’ve experienced a 20 year cold snap for the US. The Arctic is now experiencing a 44,000 year heat wave”

—Robertscribbler
Member Since: August 13, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2783
Regarding heating homes (I'm a bit late to the party):

We have an outstanding example of how to heat our homes (and run our businesses) on renewable energy. These things are already being accomplished in Denmark.

In 2011, renewable energy sources produced 40.7% of their entire domestic electrical energy output.

It gets better. Denmark is currently on track to generate 50% of their electricity from renewables by 2020, and 100% by 2050.

All while actually growing their GDP.

We already know how to heat homes with electricity. We just need to learn how to do that with renewable energy. I'm sure the Danes would be most pleased to help us out there. Those who claim it 'can't be done' don't have to look any farther than Denmark.

Side note: one of the coolest websites I've seen in a while - a realtime view of Denmark's power generation.

It's hard not to notice how much energy Denmark is actually exporting to Norway, Germany, and Sweden today (because they can't use all the energy they're creating right now).

Link
Member Since: December 21, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 231
Quoting 310. Neapolitan:
If I didn't know better, I'd say someone has a wee bit of a crush. Hey, here's a little something to hang on your bedroom wall:

Neapolitan image
And what would the caption say" I've made millions off you suckers" Ha Ha!
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Quoting 308. MisterPerfect:
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
Gore
If I didn't know better, I'd say someone has a wee bit of a crush. Hey, here's a little something to hang on your wall:

Neapolitan image

;-)
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No results found for gore "I used to believe in democracy".

What a lying piece of crap that link is.
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Gore: Reduce African Women’s Fertility to Limit Global Warming

James M. Taylor, J.D.
January 28, 2014

Global warming activist Al Gore told the World Economic Forum “making fertility management ubiquitously available” is key to the future of civilization and efforts to limit global warming. Gore said such efforts to manage African women’s fertility were important in his desire to reduce the growth of human population.



Gore complained there will be more Africans than either Chinese or Indians by mid-century and more Africans than Chinese and Indians combined by the end of the century.

A common refrain among environmental activists is that increasing human population is harmful and there should be less people on the planet. In furtherance of this goal, some environmental activists have praised China’s “one child” policy even as it encourages infanticide, especially against female babies.



Gore freely acknowledges in his 2006 movie, “An Inconvenient Truth,” that he no longer believes in democracy because democratic decisions have not comported with his global warming alarmism.

“I used to believe in democracy,” said Gore near the end of his movie, after complaining about the forces he believes have united to block global warming activism.



Link
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Deleted
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Quoting 304. iceagecoming:
>




That is an excellent report on the arctic weather. I don't have any warm weather extreme temperatures to share with you for California today, because all the temperatures were in the 50s and 60s. A little bit cooler. Thank you for sharing the east coast arctic weather report.

Sincerely,
Dave
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Quoting 304. iceagecoming:

When it does that in the same areas in August then truly we'll have an ice age coming.

Until then...the warming continues.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Deep South Deep Freeze: Buses sent to pick up stranded motorists
By Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN
updated 2:21 AM EST, Wed January 29, 2014




STORY HIGHLIGHTS

NEW: 4,500 students will spend the night in Hoover, Alabama, schools
NEW: Atlanta's mayor urges drivers to stay off streets for 24 hours
NEW: More than 3,200 flights have been canceled, FlightAware says
At least 5 were killed in weather-related traffic accidents in Alabam
a


Strangely no mention of global warming or climate change !!!





Are you affected by the frigid weather? Send CNN iReport your photos and video of ice, snow and sleet if you can do so safely.






Atlanta (CNN) -- [Breaking news update 2:23 a.m. ET Wednesday]

(CNN) -- Officials in Hoover, Alabama, were sending buses early Wednesday morning to pick up stranded motorists.

In the first run, two school buses were sent to transport as many as 100 people to local shelters, said Rusty Lowe of the Hoover fire department.

The buses will make several runs.

[Breaking news update 1:08 a.m. ET Wednesday]




About 50 Atlanta school children were still stuck on buses early Wednesday morning.

The students had gotten on buses to get home shortly after noon Tuesday, but treacherous road conditions coupled with gridlocked traffic has made it impossible.

Kimberly Willis Green, spokeswoman for Atlanta Public Schools, said she did not have an estimate on the number of children stuck in Atlanta schools overnight.

Atlanta-based Home Depot opened up 26 stores in Alabama and Georgia for stranded travelers.

Spokesman Stephen Holmes said some of those who sought shelter spent time watching movies in store break rooms.

"At one store, they even opened up an indoor garden area to be a quiet area to open for reading," he said.

[Last update 10:37 p.m. ET Tuesday]

Ice and snow bring chaotic commutes to much of South

(CNN) -- Cars stuck in ditches beside icy roads. Thousands of children stranded at schools that parents can't reach. Drivers camped out at gas stations with no way to get home.

As a winter storm slammed into a broad swath of the South on Tuesday, authorities warned drivers to stay off the streets.

"This is a very dangerous situation," Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said. "People need to stay at home. They need to stay there until conditions improve."

Motorists in major metropolitan areas including Atlanta sat trapped in gridlock as schools and offices shut down, unleashing hordes of vehicles onto slushy roadways.

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed urged residents to stop driving for at least a day to give crews a chance to clean up.

"The next 24 hours, I really need folks to stay home," he told CNN affiliate WSB. "Go home, give us some time."

While Northerners may laugh at their Southern friends' panic over a dusting of snow, the threat is real: With relatively few resources to battle snow and ice, public works crews may have a difficult time keeping up with any significant accumulation.
Students get snow day, start snow fight
Cold air pummels parts of the country
Wind chills hit 40 below
Rare snow phenomenon rolls up in Ohio
More freezing temperatures!

Add to that the fact that millions of Southern drivers aren't used to driving on snow or ice, and things got messy -- fast.

Snowflakes like you've never seen them before

Students stuck at schools

In Alabama, where freezing rain made driving perilous, at least five people were killed in weather-related traffic accidents Tuesday, state Department of Public Safety spokesman Sgt. Steve Jarrett said.

Bentley declared a state of emergency and said he had activated 350 National Guard troops to help respond to the storm. Emergency officials warned drivers to stay off the roads and urged people stuck in their cars to stay inside.

"The weather right now, the temperatures and the wind chill, if you step out of your car, are very dangerous," said Art Faulkner, the state's director of emergency management.

In Birmingham, Melanie Wilson tried to drive after she got a message that her children's school was closing Tuesday morning.

"Immediately, I almost had an accident," she said. "The school buses were at the bottom of our hill and you could tell the drivers were not sure they should try to make it up the hill. We're not sure where the ball was dropped. We heard it was going to be a light dusting with little accumulation."

She ditched her car after it spun out on a steep hill, and trudged through the snow to pick up her children and make it home safely.

"The children enjoyed it," she said. "It was beautiful, a winter wonderland. It was lovely except for worrying about everybody else who can't get home to their families."

Governor: Teachers will take care of kids

The severe weather has forced 4,500 students to spend the night in various school buildings in Hoover, Alabama. And there were 800 students stuck in schools in Birmingham, Alabama, officials said.

"Staff is staying with them, feeding them," Birmingham City Schools Superintendent Craig Witherspoon said. "High schools are showing movies."

Bentley urged parents who are unable to reach their children to remain calm.

"I know the anxiety there," he said. "I want to reassure all the parents that if you trust your teacher to take care of your child during the day, they will be taken care of tonight."

At the Alabama Waldorf School, about 20 students were spending the night at a nearby home late Tuesday after state officials urged parents not to drive in the snow.

"They're doing really well," Administrator Lisa Grupe said. "They're just having an extended play date. ... We all looked like ducks walking in the snow together."

On Twitter, a second-grade teacher said there were still about 150 students and 50 staff members stranded at Greystone Elementary School in Hoover, Alabama, because of "horrible" road conditions there.

Not that they were all complaining.

"Very exciting day," teacher Carol McLaughlin tweeted late Tuesday afternoon. "... The kids are being real troopers. : ) I think they think it's an adventure." McLaughlin, even posted a picture of some kids out playing in the snow.

Traffic gridlock traps motorists

In the Atlanta suburbs, school buses were stuck in traffic for hours. Hundreds of students were stranded at schools waiting for their parents to pick them up.

Commutes that normally take minutes became nightmarish treks that lasted for hours.

CNN affiliate WSB captured dramatic footage of parents reuniting with children after being stuck on a school bus for hours.

In downtown Atlanta, streets were clogged as cars became trapped in gridlock after at least an inch of snow had fallen.

"Government, schools, and business closing at the same time and releasing everybody out into the city was a mistake that we all were a part of," Reed told WSB.

For one stranded motorist -- it really was a situation of life and death.

Police in the Atlanta suburb of Sandy Springs said an officer helped a woman give birth on the side of Interstate 285.

Traffic jams on snow-covered roads had stopped the woman from making it to the hospital and blocked paramedics from reaching her.

That's when a police officer stepped in, helping deliver the baby girl Tuesday evening, Capt. Steve Rose said.

As snow, sleet and freezing rain pelted much of the state, authorities warned of dangerous driving conditions and said the roads would likely get worse. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency as the storm hit.

"I'm about to lose my mind, literally," one woman trapped in traffic told WSB. "It's horrible."

Mhari Patterson tried to make the 10-mile commute to her home outside Atlanta, but gave up after six hours, when she arrived at a RaceTrac gas station parking lot. There were about 80 other cars waiting out the storm there, she said.

"All of the area roads are frozen," she said. "There is no way to get home."

Until things clear up, Patterson said she planned to spend the night at the gas station.

Airlines cancel flights

The storms also snarled air travel across the country.

Airlines on Tuesday canceled more than 3,100 flights within, into or out of the United States, with hundreds each at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Houston's George Bush International Airport, Chicago O'Hare International Airport and Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, according to FlightAware.com, which tracks cancellations due to both weather and mechanical problems.

It wasn't just the South shuddering. Midwesterners and others more accustomed to bitter weather are, too.

All told, about 140 million people in 34 states were under some sort of winter weather warning or advisory, from snow and ice to bitterly cold wind chills, according to CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller.

Sleet and freezing rain began falling early Tuesday in East Texas, which along with Louisiana, was the first area to be affected by the winter storm.

"This town is shutting down," New Orleans cab driver August Delaney said.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu declared a state of emergency and warned residents to stay off the roads.

Robert Latham, the state's emergency management director, warned residents to expect power outages as well.

"We're looking at a part of the state that has a large number of pine trees," Latham said. "I can tell you that as ice accumulates on pine trees, limbs will break. Trees will fall. Power will be out."

A rough commute

It usually takes Krystle Venuti Moore 10 minutes to drive home from her job at a mall in Kennesaw, Georgia. On Tuesday, it took her five hours, even though there wasn't much snow.

It's quite a change from how storms were handled in her native New Hampshire, where she lived until she was 15.

"My family thinks it's hilarious," she said.

There was one perk in the lengthy commute: "watching the community and people helping each other out."

She saw high school students on ATVs offering rides to stranded motorists. And someone pushed her car when it got stuck.

But it wasn't all positive. She saw drivers foul up traffic as they spun out after driving too fast, and even when she got close to home, she had to park a mile away and walk.

The worst part?

Normally in five hours, "I could have driven to Florida," she said, "someplace warm."


Unfortunately this is what is in store.


Deep Freeze Recap: Coldest Temperatures of the Century for Some - weather.com






Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Deleted
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 299. yoboi:

Let me ask why you posted that, if I may? I have a suspicion that I'd like to confirm or eliminate. Thanks.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 300. DaveFive:
Quoting 203. DaveFive:Solar is one way, wind power is another way to heat our homes. We will no longer need coal, gas, wood or oil, once all the communities in the world accepts the renewable energy sources that are available now, such as wind power and solar as well as other environmentally safe renewable resources.It's The Wave Of The Present As Well As The Future. Hello nymore, Well, they use to be a dream, but now a reality because many people are using both solar and wind power in their homes and businesses now and the recent past. Yes there are some positive and negative issues with solar and wind but, I did mention other environmentally safe renewable resources, I didn't specify what those were. For areas closer to the north and south pole like Alaska, Canada, Norway, Sweeden, Finland, Iceland, Greenland, Quebec, Russia, South Africa, Argentina, Chile, Tasmania and South Island New Zealand would be able to heat their homes with "Natural Gas". Most of our city buses run on clean natural gas and that's working very well, and that's if there is enough of that source available for the far future, or will it run out.Heat Lamps is another thing that has been used present and in the past to heat rooms (Usually small rooms) in homes as well as businesses. You can purchase that item at any hardware store, just place it on any overhead light bulb socket that has a power switch on the wall.Ceiling Fans is an excellent source which brings down the rising heat, so that way the heat will not escape.Insulate the walls and ceiling of your home and business so the heat (or any heat) will remain in the room much longer. Storm Windows keeps in any heat from escaping for a long period of time.I am sure in the near future, we will come up with some other ideas to heat our homes that must be environmentally safe of course.Sincerely,DaveFive



No natural gas or any other fossil fuel because we are already doomed for the next 1000 years even if we stopped burning now.... We have already exceeded 400ppm we need to back up to 300ppm to make a difference...
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20427
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299. yoboi
The C-word
Whatever it is, don't call it climate change. At least not yet. "It has nothing to do with climate change or global warming," Mass insisted.


James Overland, a weather researcher at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, agreed that it's too early to play the climate card.

"We know there are large changes going on in the Arctic," he told NBC News. "We'll be putting more energy into the Arctic, 20 or 30 years from now. We think the potential for a linkage is there, and some people think they're starting to see some of that now. But most scientists are fairly skeptical that we can prove there's an effect already."


Link
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2442
Quoting 296. BaltimoreBrian:
Jeez birthmark you would think. I wonder how many articles and papers I've linked ;)

And you didn't even make a claim!

Ack! You're the anti-nymore that was foretold!!
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 295. Birthmark:

Carbon credits?
Carbon credits?

I don't need no stinkin' carbon credits!
If the carbon credits are in this form I would accept them ;)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Jeez birthmark you would think. I wonder how many articles and papers I've linked ;)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 292. yoboi:



I will give you some carbon credits if you come help me run crawfish traps.....

Carbon credits?

Carbon credits?

I don't need no stinkin' carbon credits!
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 293. nymore:
Where should I send the penny. I believe I am over paying but what the hell.

BTW 564,000 results in 0.27 seconds. What a burden you must carry. ROFFL

Over half a million results and you can't link one of them. Strange. Seems like it would be easier to provide a supporting link than dodge and burden shift.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469

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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.