Wobbles in the Barriers: Arctic Oscillation (4)

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 4:22 PM GMT on October 14, 2013

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Wobbles in the Barriers: Arctic Oscillation (4)

This is a continuation of my series on the Arctic Oscillation / North Atlantic Oscillation. Links to background material and previous entries are at the end.

In the last entry I suggested that if you were on a bridge overlooking a swiftly flowing creek then you would notice that twigs floating in the water did not move across the current. They are carried downstream along the edge of the current. The purpose of that comparison was to demonstrate how fast-moving, concentrated flows have the effect of isolating one side of the creek from the other. This is true in the creek, and it is also true about jet streams in the atmosphere.

One way to understand the Arctic Oscillation is to think of it as the variation of an atmospheric jet stream. For the Arctic Oscillation the jet stream of interest is the southern edge of vortex of air that circulates around the North Pole (see previous entry). Air inside the vortex often has characteristics different from air outside it. Intuitively for the Arctic, there is colder air on the side toward the pole. If you look at trace gases, like ozone, they are different across the edge of the vortex. The takeaway idea is that the edge of the vortex is a barrier. It’s not a perfect barrier, but the air on one side is largely separated from the air on the other side. In this blog, I describe the difference between a strong and a weak vortex – which is the same as the difference between the positive and negative phases of the Arctic Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation.



Figure 1: This figure is from the point of view of someone looking down from above at the North Pole (NP). Compare this perspective to Figure 1 in previous blog. This represents a strong, circular vortex centered over the pole, which encloses cold air, represented as blue. The line surrounding the cold air is the jet stream or the edge of the vortex.

Figure 1 shows an idealized schematic of the North Pole as viewed from above. This is the strong vortex case, when there is exceptionally low pressure at the pole. Low pressure is associated with counterclockwise rotation in the Northern Hemisphere. This direction of rotation is called cyclonic. This strong vortex case is the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. During this phase, the vortex aligns strongly with the rotation of the Earth, and there are relatively few wobbles of the edge of the vortex – the jet stream. I drew on the figure two points, X and Y. In this case, the point X is hot and the point Y is cold. It is during this phase when it is relatively warm and moist over, for example, the eastern seaboard of the United States.

Figure 2 compares a strong vortex and a weak vortex. In both cases, the circulation around a central point is counterclockwise or cyclonic. However, in the weak vortex case, the vortex does not align as strongly with the rotation of the Earth and there are places where the edge of vortex extends southwards. The vortex appears displaced from the pole; it is not centered over the pole.



Figure 2: Examples of a strong, circular vortex and a weak, more wavy vortex. See text for a more complete description.

Whether the vortex is stronger or weaker is determined by the atmospheric pressure at the pole. In the winter, an important factor that determines the circulation is the cooling that occurs at polar latitudes during the polar night.

What determines the waviness or wobbles at the edge of this vortex? The structure at the edge of vortex is strongly influenced by several factors. These factors include the structure of the high-pressure centers that are over the oceans and continents to the south of jet stream. One could easily imagine a strong high-pressure center over, for example, Iceland, pushing northward at the edge of the vortex. This might push a lobe of air characteristic of the middle latitude Atlantic Ocean northward. Since the edge of the vortex is something of a barrier, this high-pressure system would distort the edge of the vortex and, perhaps, push the vortex off the pole. This would appear as a displacement of the vortex and its cold air over, for example, Russia. If the high grew and faded, then this would appear as wobbles of the vortex.

Other factors that influence the waviness at the edge of the vortex are the mountain ranges and the thermal contrast between the continents and the oceans. The impact of mountains is easy to understand. Returning to the creek comparison used above, the mountains are like a boulder in the stream. The water bulges around and over the boulder; the air in the atmosphere bulges around and over the mountain ranges. The Rocky Mountains in the western half of North America are perfect examples of where there are often wobbles in the atmospheric jet stream.



Figure 3: This figure is from the point of view of someone looking down from above at the North Pole (NP). This represents a weak, wavy, wobbly vortex displaced from the pole. The vortex encloses cold air, represented as blue. The line surrounding the cold air is the jet stream or the edge of the vortex. (definition of vortex)

Figure 3 shows an idealized schematic of the North Pole as viewed from above. This is the weak vortex case, when the low pressure at the pole is not as low as average and the pressure is much higher than the strong vortex case of Figure 1. This weak vortex case is the negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation. During this phase, the alignment of the vortex with the rotation of the Earth is less prominent, and there are wobbles of the edge of the vortex – the jet stream. In this case, the point X is cold and the point Y is hot. It is during this phase where it is relatively cool and dry (but potentially snowy) over, for example, the eastern part of the United States.

These figures help to explain the prominent signal of the Arctic Oscillation discussed in the earlier entries (specifically, this blog). That is, when the vortex is weak and wobbly, then there are excursions of colder air to the south and warmer air to the north. This appears as waviness and is an important pattern of variability - warm, cold, warm, cold.

The impact of the changes in the structure of edge of the vortex does not end with these persistent periods of regional warm and cold spells. The edge of the vortex or the jet stream is also important for steering storms. Minimally, therefore, these changes in the edge of the vortex are expected to change the characteristics of how storms move. Simply, if the edge of the vortex has large northward and southward extensions, then storms take a longer time to move, for example, across the United States from the Pacific to the Atlantic Oceans. In the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation they just whip across. In the negative phase, the storms wander around a bit. A more complete discussion of this aspect of the role of the Arctic Oscillation will be in the next entry. (Note use of dramatic tension and the cliffhanger strategy of the serial.)

r

Previous entries:

Barriers in the Atmosphere
Behavior
Definitions and Some Background

August Arctic Oscillation presentation

CPC Climate Glossary “The Arctic Oscillation is a pattern in which atmospheric pressure at polar and middle latitudes fluctuates between negative and positive phases.”

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Just chatting with a fellow gardener who hailed from Western Montana. He asserts things have changed significantly for the warmer in the past ten years and whereas before no one grew vine ripened tomatoes in his region, in the past ten years it has become possible. Just one datapoint.

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The mosquito flew long after dinosaurs went extinct, and its meal was probably blood from a dino descendant.


WASHINGTON — In a steamy tropical forest 46 million years ago, a prehistoric mosquito bit a critter, drew blood and was blown into a lake in what is now the northwestern state of Montana. Belly full, she died and sank.


Link
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Quoting 53. Cochise111:
So, if the MWP was much warmer than today's climate, and it was a world-wide event, just how can CO2 be responsible for warmth when CO2 levels were over 100 ppm lower in the MWP? Another inconvenient fact for the warmists to explain.

Link
So if Hockey Shtick and Goddard's site and Watts' sites went down permanently, you'd have absolutely nothing to do, would you?

Anyway:

--The MWP wasn't global.

--A "paper" from the fossil fuel-funded SPPI and CO2 Science isn't a paper as in "peer-reviewed" or "refereed" or "credible"; it's a one-sided opinion piece. And putting one's faith into anything that "paper" has to say is akin to reading a "paper" from the local biker gang that details how healthy smoking crystal meth is, then picking up the pipe...

Sorry, Koch-ise; you've been fooled yet again. Doesn't that ever get old?
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13442
Sea level in the 5th IPCC report

What is happening to sea levels? That was perhaps the most controversial issue in the 4th IPCC report of 2007. The new report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out now, and here I will discuss what IPCC has to say about sea-level rise (as I did here after the 4th report).

Let us jump straight in with the following graph which nicely sums up the key findings about past and future sea-level rise: (1) global sea level is rising, (2) this rise has accelerated since pre-industrial times and (3) it will accelerate further in this century. The projections for the future are much higher and more credible than those in the 4th report but possibly still a bit conservative, as we will discuss in more detail below. For high emissions IPCC now predicts a global rise by 52-98 cm by the year 2100, which would threaten the survival of coastal cities and entire island nations. But even with aggressive emissions reductions, a rise by 28-61 cm is predicted. Even under this highly optimistic scenario we might see over half a meter of sea-level rise, with serious impacts on many coastal areas, including coastal erosion and a greatly increased risk of flooding.



Fig. 1. Past and future sea-level rise. For the past, proxy data are shown in light purple and tide gauge data in blue. For the future, the IPCC projections for very high emissions (red, RCP8.5 scenario) and very low emissions (blue, RCP2.6 scenario) are shown. Source: IPCC AR5 Fig. 13.27.


More »
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3128
So, if the MWP was much warmer than today's climate, and it was a world-wide event, just how can CO2 be responsible for warmth when CO2 levels were over 100 ppm lower in the MWP? Another inconvenient fact for the warmists to explain.

Link
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Well we have some here saying the world will ice over in 20 yrs and to run for your life and now we have this...... As long as trillions of tons of C02 is being pumped into the Earth's atmosphere per day....

Why cause such false alarm is beyond my understanding.....I really try to have an open mind about all this but then post like that bring me back to reality.....keep overhyping events people are starting to laugh.....If you would just provide the science without the overhype the message might be heard....
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Quoting 48. Neapolitan:
"Trillions of tons per day"?
Say what?

Well that's rather high...
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Quoting 34. BaltimoreBrian:
After all that it just cited 2 science papers. One supporting global warming, and one global cooling SkulDouggery said he had a page full of science papers from the 1970s predicting global cooling and there was just one.

ONE

Wow.

Not surprising. We've had literature reviews done before that have shown the vast majority of papers have predicted warming, not cooling, even back in the 1970s.

It's a zombie myth that, at best, came from a handful of poor media articles misinterpreted by people with less-than-stellar critical thinking skills.
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Quoting 33. BaltimoreBrian:
a fair answer tramp96. Incomplete but fair.

It was right before I was going to sleep on my phone. I was trying
to give you an idea where I was coming from not write a paper
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Quoting 45. EllenPettit:

Ehem. I think it is pretty clear that the current drought conditions in TX--along with New Mexico anD Colorado--and the neighboring states are among the worst in history.

And it will only get worse, much worse. As long as trillions of tons of C02 is being pumped into the Earth's atmosphere per day, it is very hard to say whether or not things will ever get back to normal. I don't think I'd necessarily say GW is over. But you could dream, right? ;-)
"Trillions of tons per day"?

Say what?

You've been repeatedly corrected in the past on this sort of inane statement, yet here you are again talking the same worthless nonsense. I guess it's true what they say: some people never learn...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13442
Quoting 45. EllenPettit:

Ehem. I think it is pretty clear that the current drought conditions in TX--along with New Mexico anD Colorado--and the neighboring states are among the worst in history.

And it will only get worse, much worse. As long as trillions of tons of C02 is being pumped into the Earth's atmosphere per day, it is very hard to say whether or not things will ever get back to normal. I don't think I'd necessarily say GW is over. But you could dream, right? ;-)



Care to provide any evidence?????
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
From Rabett Run:

"Al Gore has taken a lot of abuse for prematurely being against climate change over the years. One of the sillier ones was for a bit of artwork that appeared on the cover of his latest book %u201COur Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis%u201D with Gore's comment



When you unfold the cover, the image you see if the earth as we know it today with its deep blue oceans, rich soil, and green forests. This side of the cover reveals an artist%u2019s rendering of an earth where unchecked global warming has wreaked havoc. We are at a crossroads. We must choose which earth will be home to future generations.


He would, perhaps have done better to run the image past Kerry Emanuel first, but of course, the jackals pounced.

Well, these days there are three pretty big storms out there, on the other side of the earth, Cyclone Phailin which set a new record for Indian Ocean cyclones, has struck India, Typhoon Nari worked over the Philippeans and another is building up behind it and Typhoon Whipha is out there, strengthening and forcast to sideswipe Tokyo. Of course, Typhoon Usagi which worked over the Chinese coast between Hong Kong and Shanghai, a few days ago, was early to the party. Now some, not Eli to be sure, tell us nevermind that because no hurricanes have hit the US in a while (Sandy, having weakened before landing does not count). Others will note that there have been three tropical cyclones going at the same time before, so never mind. Ah, never mind.



Perhaps the artist and Al were not so far off.
"


Yes, I know that the artist got the cyclonic rotation backwards.
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Quoting 41. greentortuloni:
Hi all,

I was just wondering what your opinions on the problems in Washington are from a climate standpoint?

Personally I've been worried about it.. and then it occurred to me that while the politicians are turned and screaming at each other, this might be the break we've all been looking for: the economy shuts down and there is a slight respite from pollution.

Or is this a foolish hope and all that will happen is vital research is halted?

I keep making arguments back and forth with no clear ideas.

(sorry if this has already been discussed)


Morning greentortuloni.. :)
My personal opinion is until we go "full on" with efforts akin to WWII concerning planet responsibility and using all available Green technology "NOW",as in right now,, we shall have enjoyed the best mankind has to offer and will now experience our decline into to relative obscurity in the blip of time in which we occupy..

Edit: I do have a basic internal belief that we will snap out of this "throw away the world" mentality..
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Quoting 9. RickyRood:
This is David Archer's U of Chicago course which is very good.

I hope to start putting my course lectures on line in the near future. I have a different focus of climate change and its intersection with all things, but I do cover the basics of the science of climate change as well. Plus if you haven't figured it out, some of my blogs fit into the course.

r




Thank you Dr. Rood for your sharing of info in this blog..
Keeping it real and simple really helps me..
I don't have a great attention span but am able to fully absorb the jist of what you convey..
I for one want to send out a hearty thank you for allowing the discussions here to work themselves out..
The community does work well when allowed..
When and if you start posting online please share the Address and pertinent info..
Thanks again..
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Quoting 41. greentortuloni:
Hi all,

I was just wondering what your opinions on the problems in Washington are from a climate standpoint?

Personally I've been worried about it.. and then it occurred to me that while the politicians are turned and screaming at each other, this might be the break we've all been looking for: the economy shuts down and there is a slight respite from pollution.

Or is this a foolish hope and all that will happen is vital research is halted?

I keep making arguments back and forth with no clear ideas.

(sorry if this has already been discussed)



The economy has been shut down for yrs..........
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Hi all,

I was just wondering what your opinions on the problems in Washington are from a climate standpoint?

Personally I've been worried about it.. and then it occurred to me that while the politicians are turned and screaming at each other, this might be the break we've all been looking for: the economy shuts down and there is a slight respite from pollution.

Or is this a foolish hope and all that will happen is vital research is halted?

I keep making arguments back and forth with no clear ideas.

(sorry if this has already been discussed)
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Quoting 39. Daisyworld:


I've suspected you may be using this blog as an in-course case study for climate communication over the past few years, as that's probably what I would be doing were I teaching a course on climate change. I applaud your efforts in providing your students a method to engage in the discussion outside of the classroom!


I always hoped some of my wittier replies were discussion starters. ;)
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Quoting 9. RickyRood:
This is David Archer's U of Chicago course which is very good.

I hope to start putting my course lectures on line in the near future. I have a different focus of climate change and its intersection with all things, but I do cover the basics of the science of climate change as well. Plus if you haven't figured it out, some of my blogs fit into the course.

r




I've suspected you may be using this blog as an in-course case study for climate communication over the past few years, as that's probably what I would be doing were I teaching a course on climate change. I applaud your efforts in providing your students a method to engage in the discussion outside of the classroom!
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I posted that article back on October 10, RevElvis. I even gave it three stars :) But it's an important finding so I'm glad you posted posted it again.
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Increased human life expectancy correlates to increase in species extinction

As GDP per capita increases, so does the percentage of invasive species.


A study published by a team of biologists suggests that as a nation's population life expectancy increases, so does its percentage of invasive and endangered birds and mammals. It suggests that rather than population density alone being the largest threat to wildlife, it's the quality of life that matters most.

The very presence of humans is often blamed for the increasing numbers of extinct species on the planet. But a team of biologists from the University of California-Davis examined 15 economic, ecological, and social variables to judge which factors of that human presence are the biggest contributors to the downfall of species.

Expanding the survey to include the number of invasive species in a country revealed even more interesting results. Introducing a non-indigenous species to any given ecosystem can have devastating effects. Controlling the number of invasive species was identified as the greatest challenge threatening the Galapagos when the World Heritage Committee placed it on its danger list, for instance, and in the UK the introduction of the eastern gray squirrel from North America is blamed for devastating the red squirrel population, now down to under 200,000. What the report found, however, is that a combination of economic and social factors is responsible for this devastation—just as, in reality, deforestation and other factors have contributed to the fall of the red squirrel.

Taking in data from 100 countries, representing 87 percent of the world's total population and 43 percent of global GDP, the study focused on the following: GDP, export-import ratio, tourism, undernourishment, energy efficiency, agricultural intensity, rainfall, water stress, wilderness protection, biodiversity, life expectancy, adult literacy, pesticide regulation, political stability, and female participation in national government. It is a comprehensive look at the human impact on the landscape, but it became clear that life expectancy was the greatest correlating factor responsible for the damage.

"It's not a random pattern," says lead author Aaron Lotz, a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology at the time of the study. "Out of all this data, that one factor—human life expectancy—was the determining factor for endangered and invasive birds and mammals."

ARSTechnica.com
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
Oh, I know birthmark. I use this article for rebuttal when denier trolls start saying/lying "but scientists were predicting global cooling in the 1970s!"
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Quoting 31. BaltimoreBrian:
There's a denier troll with the handle SkulDouggery on Master's blog. Anyway, he posted a link which he says proves there was a scientific consensus in favor of global cooling. The link is here.

SkulDouggery claims that there is a link here which proves NASA feared an ice age in 1971. The article links to a Washington Times article, which doesn't link to anything else.


A lot of the links in the climate depot page are dead. Most of the rest link to Time or Newsweek articles. None I have looked at so far link to an actual scientific research paper. I don't have the time to go through everything on the climate depot page. But it would be interesting to know how many links there are, how many are dead, how many link to media articles, and how many to papers. I suspect none of the links are to scientific papers. Maybe the hive mind here can figure it out.

That is very old denialist drivel. It happens to be wrong.
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I went through skuldouggery's page and its links.

34 links total

3 links are dead
3 are to other climate depot pages

1 USA TODAY
6 New York Times
3 Time magazine
2 Washington Times
2 Dennis Dutton blog (philosophy professor died in 2010)
2 John Daly blog entries (died in 2004, not a scientist)
1 Newsweek
1 zombietime.com/zomblog
1 icecap.us, denier blog entry
1 algorelied.com
1 anonymous blog on blogspot
1 capitalismmagazine.com
1 amazon book page
1 peopleofglobalwarming.com
1 Wisconsin Energy Cooperative webpage
1 Business and media Institute

1 paper supporting global warming
1 paper from 1971 supporting global cooling (due to aerosol pollution)


After all that it just cited 2 science papers. One supporting global warming, and one global cooling SkulDouggery said he had a page full of science papers from the 1970s predicting global cooling and there was just one.

ONE

Wow.
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a fair answer tramp96. Incomplete but fair.
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Quoting 27. BaltimoreBrian:
tramp96, you didn't say whether people who agreed with the comments or stories I quoted and linked to are crazy. Do you agree with any of them?

The Quran stuff, no. I think Carson was trying to keep it in the context
of control however I wish EVERYBODY would stop bring racially
charged comments to the forefront. I think he would have been much
more effective if he would have used a different comparison.
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There's a denier troll with the handle SkulDouggery on Master's blog. Anyway, he posted a link which he says proves there was a scientific consensus in favor of global cooling back in the 1970s The link is here.

SkulDouggery claims that there is a link here which proves NASA feared an ice age in 1971. The article links to a Washington Times article, which doesn't link to anything else.


A lot of the links in the climate depot page are dead. Most of the rest link to Time or Newsweek articles. None I have looked at so far link to an actual scientific research paper. I don't have the time to go through everything on the climate depot page. But it would be interesting to know how many links there are, how many are dead, how many link to media articles, and how many to papers. I suspect none of the links are to scientific papers. Maybe the hive mind here can figure it out.
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No basis to deny global warming

When I was a first-year graduate student at Caltech, my Ph.D. adviser published a paper called “Impact-induced energy partitioning.” He asked how an asteroid’s energy would change form if it collided with the Earth. He used computer models to estimate what fraction would go into lofting debris, heating, melting, vaporizing rocks, and so on.

This subject was not settled science then, and is still not. One thing is for sure, however. The laws of physics dictate that energy is conserved. If an asteroid is hurtling toward your city, you might not be concerned that scientists are not 100 percent certain about how its energy will be “partitioned.”

Global warming is no different.

Another one of my professors was Richard Feynman. In his famous “Feynman Lectures” he had a chapter called “Conservation of Energy” in which he says:

“There is a fact, or if you wish, a law, governing all natural phenomena that are known to date. There is no exception to this law – it is exact so far as we know. The law is called conservation of energy.”...



...Uncertainty in exactly how something happens does not translate into uncertainty that it is happening. There is no rational basis for denial of the reality, or the risks, of global warming.

And there is no excuse for ignoring it.
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3128
Oh dear. You are banned from the blog for 5 minutes Revelvis! ;)
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17 - +'d the wrong post!
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
tramp96, you didn't say whether people who agreed with the comments or stories I quoted and linked to are crazy. Do you agree with any of them?
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Quoting 14. BaltimoreBrian:
For tramp96, comment 392 in previous entry.

tramp96: "Why do you feel the Tea Party members are crazy? Just a question don't read anything into it please."

Because of this, and a thousand other incidents like this at tea party rallies.

Rallier tells Obama to 'put the Quran down'

The speaker is Larry Klayman, the founder and former chairman of Judicial Watch, and now a leader in Freedom Watch, a major tea party organization.

href="http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/10 /07/truckers-for-the-constitution-plan-to-slow-dc- beltway-arrest-congressmen" target="_blank" onclick="s_objectID="http://www.usnews.com/ne ws/articles/2013/10/07/truckers-for-the-constituti on-plan-to-slow-dc-belt_1";return this.s_oc?this.s_oc(e):true" rel="nofollow">
'Truckers for the Constitution' Plan to Slow D.C. Beltway, Arrest Congressmen


Dr. Ben Carson Making Waves Again: Obamacare 'Worst Thing Since Slavery' Really? Worse than segregation laws and Pearl Harbor?

"I think, personally, it would bring stability to the world markets." on what happens if the debt limit isn't raised.

Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.)

And all the "Obama is a Muslim" and "Obama is a Kenyan" crap.

These are a few from the last week. I could go on but I think I made my point. People who believe this crap are crazies.

That is like saying all dems are loons because of Pelosi or Reid or Obama. Most of them are for simply reducing the debt which is a pretty good idea. We live within our means in my house.
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Quoting 9. RickyRood:
This is David Archer's U of Chicago course which is very good.

I hope to start putting my course lectures on line in the near future. I have a different focus of climate change and its intersection with all things, but I do cover the basics of the science of climate change as well. Plus if you haven't figured it out, some of my blogs fit into the course.

r




Thanks, Dr. Rood, Id be interested in seeing your lectures if you put them on online.
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3128
Quoting 17. Cochise111:
Climate models versus reality:
wattsupwiththat silly graph.
I think that was 50 runs with different parameters of one model, not runs of many models. So your use of the plural "models" is wrong and makes your post laughable. If you had said that temperature data the barely falls within the bounds of the model runs, you would have appeared to be a bit more intelligent.

You may have heard of a website called "WeatherUnderground" that was started by Jeff Masters, a Ph.D. Meteorologist. He's also an expert on AGW/CC, and probably a lot smarter, better educated, and wiser than you. You might consider reading his blog post from earlier this year for some factual reality regarding AGW/CC with respect to warming in the biosphere, and where the excess heat from the earth's current ongoing energy imbalance is going.

There is still surplus global heat every year, and there are other factors that can affect surface and lower troposphere temperatures. Your simple minded, cherry picked graph is one anomaly in a veritable flood of evidence that global warming is still with us in a big way.

I feel sorry for you, because it appears that you have been seriously fooled by the fossil-fuel funded denial-o-sphere via the Anthony Watts disinformation center, and are not able to see the big picture and comprehend complex issues. You might want to work on your critical thinking skills as well, which appear to be severely limited.

As Mark Twain said:


Member Since: June 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1396
Quoting 19. indianrivguy:
Norway's Investments in Renewable Energy "Could Change the World."

Interesting article about shifting the BIG dollars to something renewable.. as the World Banks are now refusing to underwrite coal plants.. things are looking better for us. The world would throw away oil in a heartbeat if there was a way to make the same profits doing something clean.

That's a very big deal. The sooner the FF industry is abandoned, the better.

:)
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Oh goody
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That anyone (comment 3) would have a problem with introductory science courses not requiring their students to have a previous science background is crazy.

It's the stupidest comment I've seen in weeks.
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Quoting 17. Cochise111:
Climate models versus reality:


So...you are comparing models of surface temperatures to measurements from the lower troposphere...and you think it shows what now? lol
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Norway's Investments in Renewable Energy "Could Change the World."

Interesting article about shifting the BIG dollars to something renewable.. as the World Banks are now refusing to underwrite coal plants.. things are looking better for us. The world would throw away oil in a heartbeat if there was a way to make the same profits doing something clean.
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http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/ cmip5-90-models-global-tsfc-vs-obs1.jpg

Really ?


Go Fish.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 419 Comments: 127377
Climate models versus reality:

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Quoting 2. FLwolverine:
Xulonn, would you mind repeating your synopsis of the Coursera course you took? I remember you said the content was excellent and the online discussions interesting. What's about the amount of work? A reference to your earlier post would be fine if you can find it (which I couldn't).

Thank you.
I can't find my post either - no search at WU blogs, and Google Site Search doesn't work well with this site.

The UBC Coursera course was good on the basics - interesting lectures, readings, videos and exercises. Most of the graphics are from SkepticalScience.com.

For a fast reader with a background in the subject, it should take about 5-10 hours per week, including the videos. I took the quizzes and aced most of them, but disenrolled before the final exam, because I was not taking it for credit or a certificate.

My comment about the discussion forums stands - they are interesting, with hundreds of participants from around the world - and even a few denialists who actually signed up for the course and spouted their b.s at the forum - stuff that was diametrically opposed to the contents and teaching of the course. I started a thread on climate denialism after I saw a few denialist comments, and it became, by far, the most active thread on the course, and I had well over a hundred pluses on that one thread. They changed the rules about credit for pluses in the forum participation section.

Interacting with people from around the world at the forums is something that makes the course worthwhile - and will make you feel good about the high level of interest in the subject by a wide range of people from all backgrounds and many countries.

Funny bit, I was accused by some twerp of spamming to get traffic to WUCC just because I mentioned Dr. Rood's blog. However, if someone else takes the course, I would recommend that you invite your "classmates" to visit us here. It would be nice to have some new visitors and guests here who are interested in science-based discussions and learning, rather than periodically seeing new pop-up, whack-a-mole denialists.
Member Since: June 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1396
Why Small-Scale Biomass Energy Projects Aren't a Solution To Climate Change

"Roberto Bissio has an excellent piece in a roundtable on biomass energy, pointing out that small scale biomass energy projects designed for people in poor countries aren't really a solution to climate change. After pointing out that patent protections could impede wide-spread adoption, Bissio adds that the people in these countries aren't really contributing to climate change in the first place: 'Why? Because poor people, whose carbon emissions these technologies would reduce, produce very little carbon in the first place. As I mentioned in Round One, the planet's poorest 1 billion people are responsible for only 3 percent of global carbon emissions. The 1.26 billion people whose countries belong to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development account for 42 percent of emissions. The rich, if they reduced their emissions by just 8 percent, could achieve more climate mitigation than the poor could achieve by reducing their emissions to zero. The rich could manage this 8 percent reduction by altering their lifestyles in barely noticeable ways. For the poor, a reduction of 100 percent would imply permanent misery.'"

Slashdot.org

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
For tramp96, comment 392 in previous entry.

tramp96: "Why do you feel the Tea Party members are crazy? Just a question don't read anything into it please."

Because of this, and a thousand other incidents like this at tea party rallies.

Rallier tells Obama to 'put the Quran down'

The speaker is Larry Klayman, the founder and former chairman of Judicial Watch, and now a leader in Freedom Watch, a major tea party organization.


'Truckers for the Constitution' Plan to Slow D.C. Beltway, Arrest Congressmen


Dr. Ben Carson Making Waves Again: Obamacare 'Worst Thing Since Slavery' Really? Worse than segregation laws and Pearl Harbor?

"I think, personally, it would bring stability to the world markets." on what happens if the debt limit isn't raised.

Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.)

And all the "Obama is a Muslim" and "Obama is a Kenyan" crap.

These are a few from the last week. I could go on but I think I made my point. People who believe this crap are crazies.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 7. JohnLonergan:
More on the Coursera offering at RealClimate:

Sample video(8:13)

I'm interested in the course, anyone else?

I'm interested, but almost wondering if it would be worth my time or just a rehashing of concepts I already know. I've thought about taking it before as sort of a "continuing education" sort of thing. We are asked by office management to do additional training every 6 months.
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Quoting 8. Naga5000:
Yoboi, you also may be appalled to know this, but AGW is even taught in college level Intro to Meteorology courses. You know scientists teach science, correct?

Next thing you know, scientists at colleges will be requiring their students to think critically!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 6. Naga5000:


Very interesting your first thought goes to brainwashing instead of understanding that the term "without a science background" in academia refers to those with little to no education in the sciences, in fact if you were to actually click on the link and read it you would see exactly what they mean.

"Recommended Background

This course assumes no scientific knowledge and is geared toward a general audience. The problem sets require high-school-level algebra.
The optional programming assignments require a fair amount of number crunching, but this can be accomplished with a spreadsheet application such as Google Spreadsheets."

You see, you only need to know algebra. It is how they teach the topics. So instead of insulting those of us who appreciate education and academia, why don't you sign up for the free course. Who knows, you might actually learn something.
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
This is David Archer's U of Chicago course which is very good.

I hope to start putting my course lectures on line in the near future. I have a different focus of climate change and its intersection with all things, but I do cover the basics of the science of climate change as well. Plus if you haven't figured it out, some of my blogs fit into the course.

r


Quoting 7. JohnLonergan:
More on the Coursera offering at RealClimate:

Sample video(8:13)

I'm interested in the course, anyone else?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Yoboi, you also may be appalled to know this, but AGW is even taught in college level Intro to Meteorology courses. You know scientists teach science, correct?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
More on the Coursera offering at RealClimate:

Sample video(8:13)

I'm interested in the course, anyone else?
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3128

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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.

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