Colorado’s Big Flood: Arctic Oscillation (5)

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 4:36 AM GMT on September 17, 2013

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Colorado’s Big Flood: Arctic Oscillation (5)

I am going to continue with my series on the Arctic Oscillation, but I am going to take a diversion. That’s why this one is labeled number 5 – numbers 3 and 4 will be forthcoming. The first two in the series have definitions of terms and references to more materials (link to number 1 and link to number 2). I will, ultimately, bring this flood back to climate change and the Arctic Oscillation discussion – I think with plausibility.

I am writing this at the time of a historic flood in Colorado (Denver Post Photos). This flood has been labeled a 100 year flood in Boulder (Boulder Creek) and a 500 year flood in Longmont (St. Vrain River). The geographical reach of the flood is large, reaching from Colorado Springs in the south to Fort Collins in the north, about 130 miles. This geographical span also distinguishes this flood as compared to, for example, the Big Thompson River flood of 1976. Chris Burt wrote a blog about the history of flash floods in Boulder. The last flood that rivals the 2013 flood was in 1894.

I live in Colorado and I have a sizable garden that leads me to doing all sorts of things in the ground. Once digging a hole three feet deep to find an old pipe, at about 18 inches, I ran across a layer of rounded, smooth rocks. A local, who I tend to believe, told me that this was the wash from the 1894 flood. That put me in mind of Death Valley where there are massive alluvial fans of similar rounded rocks at the mouth of every canyon. You walk in these rocks and there are times they have an almost fluid character; you sink into them a few inches. Death Valley is dry and it does not hold soil. So these deep accumulations of rocks are visible. If you think about the flash floods and the years needed to build the piles it is staggering. After running across this likely layer of the 1894 flood, I looked around, and indeed, one does see the same form of alluvial fans in Colorado, only they are covered with soil and plants.

The normal flow for Boulder Creek is around 200 cubic feet per second, and in the 2013 flood numbers closer to 5000 cubic feet per second were measured. In the town of Boulder, the most obvious damage was on the western side of town on the steep slopes of the Foothills. Further up into the mountains, where there is great devastation, are the scars of many forest fires of the past few years – again, extending from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins. In these places the ground, which is a combination of soil and plant and those smooth rocks, liquefies. The ground first saturates with water, then turns into a mixture of dirt, rock and water. This slurry turns into slides and gushers of heavy suffocating material. The ground under houses essentially melts, and houses join in the flow. Roads crumble, join the fluid along with cars. There is danger from being overwhelmed from above and undercut from below. People die.

As these slides of water, rock, and detritus of the forests and the city move down stream, the heavier material drops out and flotsam, dirt and water flows into the channels of the gullies, creeks and ditches. In places, like the city of Boulder, flood-control fortifications channel the flood, and then it spews and spreads as it gets to more open land in the plains.

Most people who come to Boulder and the cities and towns of the Front Range think of mountains. However, most of the people and buildings sit away from the mountains. Traveling east from the mountains there are first mesas, and it is not far before one is in the high plains. Towns such as Longmont view Long’s Peak; they don’t sit on Long’s Peak. Longmont, Loveland and many others are more of the plains than of the mountains. If you drive north and south just five miles from Boulder, the straight roads go up and down the mesas, no more than about 100 feet in elevation. Between the mesas are the wide valleys of Boulder Creek, Left Hand Creek and the St. Vrain River. These valleys are the historical flood plains, and in a flood like the 2013 flood, they fill up. In 2013 they are also full of farms and houses and towns. The creek channels and ditches are engineered to carry water where it is wanted, but in a flood like this, the type of flood that made this wide valley, the water and the suspended soil and the rolling rocks fill up the valley like it has for thousands of years.

As I write this most of the water has moved down to the South Platte River and a diminishing flood is pulsing north towards Nebraska and Omaha and the Missouri River. The Front Range of Colorado is wet and wounded. The air and ground feel and smell like the aftermath of a hurricane. There is a surge of rot as late summer fields start of compost. Today I found crushed crayfish a hundred yards from what I presume is their home in an irrigation ditch, giving a coastal fishy smell. There are clumps of sodden pink insulation. Plastic bags of rotting garbage.

Climate: With the Pakistan flood in 2010 I started climate case studies. From a weather point of view, there are some similarities with Pakistan. There is moist air coming from a warm southern ocean, there are high mountains, and there are high and low pressure systems steering a river of that moist air, warm over cold, up the mountains. As the air rises it rains. Because these weather patterns are stuck, persistent, the rain is relentless. From a point of view of scale, the geographical expanse, the Colorado flood is much smaller than the Pakistani flood. From a preparedness and infrastructure point of view, there is no comparison. The resilience of Boulder, Longmont, Estes Park and Lyons will prove much more robust than that of Peshawar. As a climate case study, this mix of geography, weather, built environment and resilience are all part of the mix.

But what of climate change? It is reasonable to pose that climate change is playing into the Colorado flood and its impacts in at least two ways. The first is a change of the land surface. There has been change in the forest due to drought. There has been change due to destruction of forest by pine beetles. A large amount of land has burned in the past few years. The fire season has been long, the fires intense.

The second possible impact of climate change is in the weather pattern that has caused the flood. Let’s step back a few months. In March of this year much of the region that has been flooded was in extreme and extended drought. Then in April, in quite a localized region, there was every week a record snowstorm, providing four feet of snow. The monsoonal rain was pretty regular during the summer, but we came into September below average precipitation by quite a bit. Tuesday a week ago, the predicted rain was said to be enough that we might get up to average. A little later that week it was the largest rain event ever. The one day total passed the previous record by a factor of two. A couple of days later we have the wettest year ever.

This pattern of rain is hard to ignore. Persistent patterns of weather, with weather systems moving from east to west. This is where I will make the link to climate change and the Arctic Oscillation.

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The Oil & Gas Industry's Fractured Fairy Tales (Op-Ed)

What if I told you that a recent study found that relatively new, unconventional ways to produce oil and gas — horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking " — added an average of $1,200 to U.S. household disposable income in 2012? And that this drilling "revolution," enabling the industry to recover previously inaccessible shale reserves, supported 2.1 million jobs last year and is projected to support 3.3 million by 2020?

Sounds pretty good, no?

But what if I told you that the study not only exaggerates the number of fracking-related jobs, but also that it was funded by the oil and gas industry's trade association — the American Petroleum Institute (API) — along with, among others, the American Chemistry Council, America's Natural Gas Alliance, the National Association of Manufacturers, the Natural Gas Supply Association and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce?

Maybe you wouldn't be as impressed.

What is most egregious about that self-serving study, however, is that it tells only half of the story. What's missing are oil and gas's considerable drawbacks, notably their impact on public health, the environment and the climate. It's analogous to a tobacco industry-funded study claiming a new type of cigarette created new jobs and saved smokers.

LiveScience.com
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
You're very welcome Rookie :)
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
For indianrivguy, courtesy of etxwx:

With Murky Water And Manatee Deaths, Lagoon Languishes
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
I have spending the past three weeks over here

I know that we deal with a lack of critical thinking by a few members here, but you ain't seen nuttin' until you see the zany antics over there. A complete insistence by the denial industry members over there that they are fully certified skeptics. Certifiable, perhaps, but certified, no way. They have been shown countless times and by many what the difference is between a skeptic and someone that is denial. Of course they deny there is any difference at all, but what is one to expect from a denier of the evidence presented before them? An admittance???

I am doing the best that my limited capabilities allow me to succeed with, but there is a serious lack of those that actually understand the AGWT over there and the attempts to interject some critical thinking is a .... challenge. There are a few that are well informed and know how to properly convey the message of the AGWT, but too few to make a difference. That place is even more troll ridden than this blog was two years ago. Oh yes, they work on a point system over there and the puppet industry members award their fellow puppets the "best answer" award and this pumps up their percentage of "best answer" and gives the appearance to the uninformed that these puppets are knowledgeable on the subject. Uh, no. They are not, but they are quite adept at the standard double speak of the puppets.

Where is Brian and his nightly report of links? I learn a lot from the links he gives us. ... Never mind, I see Brian just posted them. Thank you, Brian! I may have to add another app just to store more bookmarks. Hmmm, perhaps a spreadsheet for bookmarks? I may patent that idea so don't anyone claim they thought of it first!
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What the Insurance Industry Thinks About Climate Change

When it comes to the calculating the likelihood of catastrophic weather, one group has an obvious and immediate financial stake in the game: the insurance industry. And in recent years, the industry researchers who attempt to determine the annual odds of catastrophic weather-related disasters—including floods and wind storms—say they’re seeing something new.

“Our business depends on us being neutral. We simply try to make the best possible assessment of risk today, with no vested interest,” says Robert Muir-Wood, the chief scientist of Risk Management Solutions (RMS), a company that creates software models to allow insurance companies to calculate risk. “In the past, when making these assessments, we looked to history. But in fact, we’ve now realized that that’s no longer a safe assumption—we can see, with certain phenomena in certain parts of the world, that the activity today is not simply the average of history.”

This pronounced shift can be seen in extreme rainfall events, heat waves and wind storms. The underlying reason, he says, is climate change, driven by rising greenhouse gas emissions. Muir-Wood’s company is responsible for figuring out just how much more risk the world’s insurance companies face as a result of climate change when homeowners buy policies to protect their property.


Blogs.Smithsonianmag.com



For Insurers, No Doubts on Climate Change

NYTimes.com


Rising Sea Levels, Plummeting Waterfront Property Values?

TheAtlanticCities.com
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
Quoting 375. yoboi:



What would you say the odds are for that to happen????

It has never, in human history, happened even once. That's a trend, like rising temperature, that I fully expect to continue.

You may look up the "evolution debate" for confirmation --or any other conspiracy theories.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
375. yoboi
Quoting 373. Birthmark:

I'd be delighted to give up the fun if everyone suddenly went sane. Very delighted indeed.



What would you say the odds are for that to happen????
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2344
374. etxwx
I ran across this today....
Why We're Shutting Off Our Comments

Interview here:
'Popular Science': Web Comments Are Bad For Science
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Quoting 371. FLwolverine:
Suppose the denier/skeptics gave a party and nobody showed up?

Edited to add: but then we wouldn't want Birthmark to miss out on the fun, would we?

I'd be delighted to give up the fun if everyone suddenly went sane. Very delighted indeed.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
372. yoboi
Quoting 371. FLwolverine:
Suppose the denier/skeptics gave a party and nobody showed up?



There would be peace????
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2344
Suppose the denier/skeptics gave a party and nobody showed up?

Edited to add: but then we wouldn't want Birthmark to miss out on the fun, would we?
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383
Quoting 366. Neapolitan:
Yes, you did. Yeoman's work, I have to say, especially given that they were all over you today. In fact, great work everyone! But be prepared; tomorrow--and the weekend, and into next week--are going to bring more of the same anti-science...


It just never stops.....
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Image of the Day

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide

Sep 27, 2013




The map above shows carbon dioxide in the mid-troposphere, the part of the atmosphere where most weather occurs. The data was collected in May 2013, when carbon dioxide levels reached their highest point in at least 800,000 years. The highest concentrations, shown in yellow, are in the Northern Hemisphere. Concentrations are lower in the Southern Hemisphere. In May, the Northern Hemisphere growing season was just beginning, so plants were removing little carbon from the atmosphere.

download large image (498 KB, JPEG, 2610x1306)

Complete article here.

Member Since: November 22, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1281
The term anti-thought could also be used.
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Quoting 366. Neapolitan:
Yes, you did. Yeoman's work, I have to say, especially given that they were all over you today. In fact, great work everyone! But be prepared; tomorrow--and the weekend, and into next week--are going to bring more of the same anti-science...

Hard to imagine it being much more non-sensical compared to today.
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Quoting 363. Naga5000:


I made it through unscathed.
Yes, you did. Yeoman's work, I have to say, especially given that they were all over you today. In fact, great work everyone! But be prepared; tomorrow--and the weekend, and into next week--are going to bring more of the same anti-science...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13555
In advance of the denialist propaganda onslaught with the release of the IPCC report tomorrow, Eli Stole the Playbook

For those bunniesTM E Rabett wondering about the noise machine revving up before tomorrow's release of the IPCC WG1 final draft, Eli will let you in on a secret. The playbook is out there for your reading pleasure, actually in the tobacco archive.

They talk about a speakers program where identified spokespeople in local markets a attract press attention.
As you know we have 200 media trained activists in the field. Prior to this project we were working on plans to fully activate all of these people

The goal was that
News media will recognize our spokespersons as source for accurate, timely, and credible information.

For outreach
Each spokesperson will be given a list of all media in area. Where feasible spokesperson will schedule brief one on one meetings with reporters/editors to introduce themselves and leave information. Key media not reached will be mailed a rolodex type card with brief information

Editorial board outreach was very important
Place senior executives and identified spokesmen with select editorial boards.

One of their key messages was
"Develop "class war" stressing the impact of FET on lower income people"


and, of course, get "scientists" to fabricate a case against the EPA.

Eli gotta go, but read the tobacco industry plan and process what is happening in light of it. Yes, that includes our friends in the press
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Quoting 360. Birthmark:
Jeez, I miss *one* day, and it's the day where I could have had the most fun! Bah!

Thanks to those of you who so admirably put down the drooling babbling on Dr. Masters' blog today. Great job.


I just came from reading the comment thread on this article at The Guardian:

Leading climate change economist brands sceptics 'irrational'>
You could sign up there, I'm sure it would be a lot of fun.
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Quoting 343. FLwolverine:
Looks like a good day to avoid Dr M's blog. He posts about the IPCC and the blog starts talking about religion! Good luck, Naga, and anyone else brave/foolish enough to venture into the inevitable train wreck. Even the mouse is bareing its teeth today.


I made it through unscathed.
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Simon Donner on

The pause in public understanding of climate change

The Fifth IPCC assessment report on the physical science of climate change will be released tomorrow. It is probably the largest, most comprehensive scientific assessment in history. Not just of climate change, but of any scientific subject. Really. Try to think of any scientific report with more contributors, more citations, more reviewers, more pages, and more preparation time.

Unfortunately, the report is being overshadowed by confusion about a perceived slowdown in the rate of global warming. The graph below, is based on the GISS estimates of global average surface temperatures since the early 1970s. There is a clear signal of rising temperatures amidst the noise of natural variability.



The slowdown in surface temperature change is part of that natural variability. The planet is still gaining extra heat due to human enhancement of the natural greenhouse effect. As Stephan Rahmstorf summarized nicely on RealClimate, the difference is that over the past decade or so, a larger proportion of that heat than normal has gone into the deep ocean. In a few years, the yin of deep ocean heating will give way to the yang of surface temperature warming. When conditions in the Pacific Ocean again allow the development of a strong, traditional El Nino event - a la 1997/8, or 1982/3 - we'll see new global surface temperature records. We should not mistake a landing for the top of the stairwell, as Richard Muller wisely analogized at the end of an article that otherwise is so obtuse I'm reluctant to give it mention here.

The media noise surrounding the perceived slowdown is part of the natural variability of public understanding of climate change. Our research has shown that public attitudes about climate change in the United States ebb and flow with the climate. After a cool period, people tend to be less convinced and less concerned about climate change.

It's worth imagining different labels on the axes of the temperature graph. The public conversation about climate warming follows a similarly noisy trajectory. There is a long-term trend towards greater public understanding, better reporting, and better informed discussion at the political level. There is also variability, due to the natural ups and downs of the climate, current events, etc.



This is the natural process of knowledge acquisition. We're learning more about more about how the planet works over time. The path, however, is not smooth. There are also periods when the knowledge in the scientific community or the public barely changes, or even goes in the wrong direction before jumping back onto an upward trajectory. There is plenty of evidence for brief periods of "negative learning" in the recent history, including scientific understanding of the causes of ozone destruction.

Years from now, we'll look back at this temporary slowdown in the rate of surface temperature warming and shake our heads. This is a temporary landing in the middle of the stairwell of rising air temperatures and rising public acceptance of the magnitude of the human role in climate change.
Member Since: November 22, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1281
Quoting 360. Birthmark:
Jeez, I miss *one* day, and it's the day where I could have had the most fun! Bah!

Thanks to those of you who so admirably put down the drooling babbling on Dr. Masters' blog today. Great job.
Woudn't surprise me if there's a rematch tomorrow if Doc posts on the contents of the report. I'm sure we'll all be glad to let you play.
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383
Jeez, I miss *one* day, and it's the day where I could have had the most fun! Bah!

Thanks to those of you who so admirably put down the drooling babbling on Dr. Masters' blog today. Great job.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5469
Quoting 346. JohnLonergan:


All the more reason to post it. Yeah, I feel like stirring the pot today.


A brighter flame attracts more moths.

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Some Facts You Should Know About Fukushima



CounterPunch.org
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http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/GECON-0 1-250913.htmlLink
Given both the type of fuel it burns and the altitude at which its planes operate, in addition to its massive growth in recent decades, the airline industry is one of the single largest contributors of greenhouse gases. Analysts suggest that if it were a country, the industry would be the seventh-largest global polluter.

Currently those emissions contribute between 2 and 3% of total greenhouse gases. Yet there is broad agreement that these levels are set to increase dramatically in coming years.
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Quoting 353. FLwolverine:
Didn't take long at all, did it? For the no warming argument to be raised, I mean. Glad you posted the chart!


Comments 103 and 105 pushed me over the edge.
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Quoting 348. SteveDa1:


I'll leave you the honors then. I don't want to be responsible. ;)
Didn't take long at all, did it? For the no warming argument to be raised, I mean. Glad you posted the chart!
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383
Eli Rabett on

ESTABLISHED SCIENCE


In which Eli goes all Frank Luntz on the bunnies and takes up the wordsmith's burden and suggests nixing the phrase settled science and taking up established science. Why you ask?

In the approach to the WG1 rollout, the Flat Earthers are going all wingnut again about "settled science" and have stirred up the Aunties, including the editor of Nature. Well, yes young'en, there ain't no such thing as science somebunny can't ask questions about, but there are certainly questions about which it is pretty clearly recognized that asking the questions displays a certain lack of learning, or others where the cost benefit analysis says that working to get an answer is somewhere between betting your life on double zero in roulette and spitting into the wind although more fun. ...

...There is no doubt that there are many things about climate science that are well established and that only the cranks dispute, this is the consensus. Established science is what the IPCC uses when it says that humans are changing the climate in ways that threaten the environment in which we live. And, of course, please send Eli a carrot when you talk about Established Science
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A hotter world is a hungrier world warns Oxfam ahead of IPCC report

Climate change will leave families caught in a vicious spiral of falling incomes, rising food prices, and declining quality of food, leading to a devastating impact on the health of millions, Oxfam warns today (Sep 23, 2013).


Oxfam’s new report Growing Disruption offers an up to date assessment of the links between climate change and the many causes of hunger. While there is increasing awareness that climate change can harm crop production, the report shows that its threat on food security is much broader, hitting incomes, food quality and human health in ways that are not yet well understood.

At a time when one in eight people are going hungry and demand for food is rising, climate change will not only reduce production, it will reduce the nutritional value of both crops and livestock, worsen human health and lead to higher prices. Climate change will mean that many more people will not be able to afford enough to eat and this toxic mix is likely to hit regions that are already more susceptible to food insecurity.

Read more...
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Quoting 332. FLwolverine:
#331 - JohnL - there's a problem with your link. Here's the right one Link

Thanks. Edited to say: finished with the field guide. Only wish I could arrange for these guys to be first in line..........


Thanks for fixing it.
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Quoting 346. JohnLonergan:


All the more reason to post it. Yeah, I feel like stirring the pot today.
Have fun!
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Quoting 346. JohnLonergan:


All the more reason to post it. Yeah, I feel like stirring the pot today.


I'll leave you the honors then. I don't want to be responsible. ;)
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#344 - SteveDa1 - maybe wait until someone starts the "it hasn't warmed in 15 (or whatever) years" trope. It probably won't be long now.
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383
Quoting 344. SteveDa1:
Is it ever a good time to head over there? I'm afraid to post this article there since it will probably cause bickering.



All the more reason to post it. Yeah, I feel like stirring the pot today.
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Quoting 343. FLwolverine:
Looks like a good day to avoid Dr M's blog. He posts about the IPCC and the blog starts talking about religion! Good luck, Naga, and anyone else brave/foolish enough to venture into the inevitable train wreck. Even the mouse is bareing its teeth today.


I was thinking of posting a quote from Augustine where he speaks out against a literal interpretation of Genesis and sitting back and laughing.
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3349
Is it ever a good time to head over there? I'm afraid to post this article there since it will probably cause bickering.

Faux Pause: Ocean Warming, Sea Level Rise And Polar Ice Melt Speed Up, Surface Warming To Follow

BY JOE ROMM ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 AT 5:34 PM


Decadal surface-air temperature (%uFFFDC) via average of datasets maintained by the HadCRU, NOAA and NASA.


"Global Warming Has Accelerated In Past 15 Years, New Study Of Oceans Confirms," as we reported back in March. And "Greenland Ice Melt Up Nearly Five-Fold Since Mid-1990s, Antarctica's Ice Loss Up 50% In Past Decade," as we reported last November. Another study that month found "sea level rising 60% faster than projected."

And yet much of the media believes climate change isn't what gets measured and reported by scientists, but is somehow a dialectic or a debate between scientists and deniers. So while 2010 was the hottest year on record and the 2000s the hottest decade on record, we are subject to nonsensically framed stories like this one from CBS, headlined "Controversy over U.N. report on climate change as warming appears to slow."

--Completely contrary to the popular contrarian myth, global warming has accelerated, with more overall global warming in the past 15 years than the prior 15 years. This is because about 90% of overall global warming goes into heating the oceans, and the oceans have been warming dramatically.

--As suspected, much of the 'missing heat' Kevin Trenberth previously talked about has been found in the deep oceans. Consistent with the results of Nuccitelli et al. (2012), this study finds that 30% of the ocean warming over the past decade has occurred in the deeper oceans below 700 meters, which they note is unprecedented over at least the past half century.

--Some recent studies have concluded based on the slowed global surface warming over the past decade that the sensitivity of the climate to the increased greenhouse effect is somewhat lower than the IPCC best estimate. Those studies are fundamentally flawed because they do not account for the warming of the deep oceans.

--The slowed surface air warming over the past decade has lulled many people into a false and unwarranted sense of security.


More at Climate Progress ===>
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Looks like a good day to avoid Dr M's blog. He posts about the IPCC and the blog starts talking about religion! Good luck, Naga, and anyone else brave/foolish enough to venture into the inevitable train wreck. Even the mouse is bareing its teeth today.
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383
Quoting 334. Daisyworld:

snip


I feel very sorry for you, as I can't imagine what it must be like to live in a world where knowledge, intellectualism, and understanding are usurped by assumptions, irrelevancy, and dishonesty, with only bickering and argumentative chaos permeating the darkness.


They say ignorance is bliss.
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Canada Silences Scientists, Targets Environmentalists in Tar Sands Push

Truth-Out.org (Video & Transcript)
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Climate Change Devastating Ocean Fisherman: ‘Sometimes We’ll Catch 5,000 Pounds Of Jellyfish’

For many U.S. fisherman, there’s no debate about climate change. It’s here, and already majorly impacting their industries.

In New Jersey, Rutgers scientists have documented for 24 years how climate change is affecting the state’s oceans through weekly fish surveys. The researchers are finding fewer and fewer northern species and more and more southern species — fish like the Atlantic croaker, which historically have rarely ventured into the cool waters surrounding New Jersey. Mackerel and clams, which were once common, are now moving north, forcing fisherman to reevaluate what they fish for.

“As far as fishermen are concerned, climate change is here. This is a reality,” Tom Fote, of the Jersey Coast Anglers Association, told the Philadelphia Inquirer. “We’re going to have to change the way we fish.”

And it’s not just in New Jersey. Off the coast of Oregon, ocean acidification and hypoxia — a depletion in the ocean’s oxygen which can cause dead zones — are two of the biggest problems facing the region’s ocean ecosystems. Both are linked to climate change: the ocean absorbs about 30 to 40 percent of the atmosphere’s excess carbon, causing its pH to drop, and one study found hypoxia tends to increase as temperatures rise. Particularly off the coast of Oregon, where hypoxia began occurring in 2002 and anoxia — an area with zero oxygen — first emerged in 2006, more evidence is pointing to climate change as a likely culprit of the patches of depleted oxygen.

These effects are causing trouble for Oregon fishermen. Rising water temperatures and ocean acidification are causing jellyfish populations to increase off the coast of Oregon (and also around the world), disrupting the ocean ecosystem and clogging fishermen’s nets.

ThinkProgress.org
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How much longer is the "Fauxlibuster" going to go on?
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
338. yoboi
Quoting 335. Patrap:
I really consider that remark as an insult to me....

I kinda figured Mr. Cruz would be sleeping instead of blogging here.

So............




U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 110th Congress - 1st Session

as compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate Bill Clerk under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

Vote Summary

Question: On the Motion (Motion to Concur in House Amdt. to Senate Amdt to H.R.2206 )
Vote Number: 181 Vote Date: May 24, 2007, 08:26 PM
Required For Majority: 1/2 Vote Result: Motion Agreed to
Measure Number: H.R. 2206 (U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 )
Measure Title: Making emergency supplemental appropriations and additional supplemental appropriations for agricultural and other emergency assistance for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2007, and for other purposes.

Vote Counts: YEAs 80
NAYs 14
Not Voting 6

Vote Summary By Senator Name By Vote Position By Home State

Alphabetical by Senator Name
Akaka (D-HI), Yea
Alexander (R-TN), Yea
Allard (R-CO), Yea
Baucus (D-MT), Yea
Bayh (D-IN), Yea
Bennett (R-UT), Yea
Biden (D-DE), Yea
Bingaman (D-NM), Yea
Bond (R-MO), Yea
Boxer (D-CA), Nay
Brown (D-OH), Yea
Brownback (R-KS), Not Voting
Bunning (R-KY), Yea
Burr (R-NC), Nay
Byrd (D-WV), Yea
Cantwell (D-WA), Yea
Cardin (D-MD), Yea
Carper (D-DE), Yea
Casey (D-PA), Yea
Chambliss (R-GA), Yea
Clinton (D-NY), Nay
Coburn (R-OK), Nay
Cochran (R-MS), Yea
Coleman (R-MN), Not Voting
Collins (R-ME), Yea
Conrad (D-ND), Yea
Corker (R-TN), Yea
Cornyn (R-TX), Yea
Craig (R-ID), Yea
Crapo (R-ID), Yea
DeMint (R-SC), Yea
Dodd (D-CT), Nay
Dole (R-NC), Yea
Domenici (R-NM), Yea
Dorgan (D-ND), Yea
Durbin (D-IL), Yea
Ensign (R-NV), Yea
Enzi (R-WY), Nay
Feingold (D-WI), Nay
Feinstein (D-CA), Yea
Graham (R-SC), Yea
Grassley (R-IA), Yea
Gregg (R-NH), Yea
Hagel (R-NE), Yea
Harkin (D-IA), Yea
Hatch (R-UT), Not Voting
Hutchison (R-TX), Yea
Inhofe (R-OK), Yea
Inouye (D-HI), Yea
Isakson (R-GA), Yea
Johnson (D-SD), Not Voting
Kennedy (D-MA), Nay
Kerry (D-MA), Nay
Klobuchar (D-MN), Yea
Kohl (D-WI), Yea
Kyl (R-AZ), Yea
Landrieu (D-LA), Yea
Lautenberg (D-NJ), Yea
Leahy (D-VT), Nay
Levin (D-MI), Yea
Lieberman (ID-CT), Yea
Lincoln (D-AR), Yea
Lott (R-MS), Yea
Lugar (R-IN), Yea
Martinez (R-FL), Yea
McCain (R-AZ), Yea
McCaskill (D-MO), Yea
McConnell (R-KY), Yea
Menendez (D-NJ), Yea
Mikulski (D-MD), Yea
Murkowski (R-AK), Yea
Murray (D-WA), Yea
Nelson (D-FL), Yea
Nelson (D-NE), Yea
Obama (D-IL), Nay
Pryor (D-AR), Yea
Reed (D-RI), Yea
Reid (D-NV), Yea
Roberts (R-KS), Yea
Rockefeller (D-WV), Yea
Salazar (D-CO), Yea
Sanders (I-VT), Nay
Schumer (D-NY), Not Voting
Sessions (R-AL), Yea
Shelby (R-AL), Yea
Smith (R-OR), Yea
Snowe (R-ME), Yea
Specter (R-PA), Yea
Stabenow (D-MI), Yea
Stevens (R-AK), Yea
Sununu (R-NH), Yea
Tester (D-MT), Yea
Thomas (R-WY), Not Voting
Thune (R-SD), Yea
Vitter (R-LA), Yea
Voinovich (R-OH), Yea
Warner (R-VA), Yea
Webb (D-VA), Yea
Whitehouse (D-RI), Nay
Wyden (D-OR), Nay



IDK....
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2344
337. yoboi
Quoting 335. Patrap:
I really consider that remark as an insult to me....

I kinda figured Mr. Cruz would be sleeping instead of blogging here.

So............


I will have to look did he vote against the katrina bill like nevermind.....
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2344
336. yoboi
334...


maybe some of these books can help you understand???




Link
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2344
I really consider that remark as an insult to me....

I kinda figured Mr. Cruz would be sleeping instead of blogging here.

So............
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 321. yoboi:
I really consider that remark as an insult to me....you and I have agreed and disagreed with many topics....and the times we have disagreed we were respectful to each other....go jump on the bandwagon with the others....a few of you on this blog I really had some respect for when debating.....just because I disagree with AGW I am trying to support my reasoning why with links to support it.....most of you get all bent out of shape when some people come thru and do a drive by and will not really debate back...I on the other hand will be here to debate why I think the way I do.....sorry if the information ruffles the feathers.....


An insult to YOU? And what exactly have you been doing? Passing out flowers to every climate scientist and giving them a pat on the back? No, you've been invalidating their ENTIRE CAREERS by dismissing their hard work collected over many decades and claiming that some other "truth" that is not governed by reason, logic, or even mathematics, somehow takes prescience. How do you think THEY should feel?

I don't believe for one moment that you're sorry for "ruffling feathers". If you were, you'd at least be showing some sense of conciliatory tone in your thinking, toning down your opinions and presuppositions with a "I could be wrong", or a "my understanding is", or possibly even a "you may be right, but I still think otherwise".

Instead, you continue to insult others by posting lies and misinformation to this forum, and stringing others along by asking circular and assuming questions on climate science. This indicates to me that you REVEL in "ruffling feathers", and is in fact why you're here:

You like to start arguments, and morbidly enjoy watching others fight over a schism that YOU started.

It's sick, it's demented, and really doesn't help further understanding of climate science. It doesn't even address the topics of Dr. Roods blog entries. All you do is fan the fires of discord, getting us no closer to discussing the real problems or finding real solutions.

I feel very sorry for you, as I can't imagine what it must be like to live in a world where knowledge, intellectualism, and understanding are usurped by assumptions, irrelevancy, and dishonesty, with only bickering and argumentative chaos permeating the darkness.
Member Since: January 11, 2012 Posts: 6 Comments: 857
Republican solution to wildfires: Sell the trees!

House Republicans have a cunning plan for tackling the wildfires that have been ravaging the American West this fire season: They want to allow loggers to haul away the trees before they burn.

No forests means no forest fires, see?



The Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act was approved mostly along party lines by the Republican-controlled House of Representatives on Friday. The bill would more than double logging nationwide and turn some forestlands into pasturelands.

But the bill will never become law. President Obama has vowed to veto it if it ever reaches his desk.

It's not that it's a bad idea to reduce fuel in the nation's forests to help preempt wildfires. By taking a hard-line approach to fighting every wildfire, Americans have inadvertently created unnaturally incendiary conditions. Leaf litter, woody detritus, and dense stands of trees that would be cleared out by frequent fires build up, then explode into infernos. Meanwhile, scores of small trees that flourish in the absence of regular fires can damage ecosystems and hog water.

But this bill is a public giveaway to private logging interests masquerading as a fire-prevention effort. From the L.A. Times:

Republicans portrayed the bill as a jobs measure that would prop up the economies of rural counties, which would receive a fourth of the money from timber sales to help fund schools and other services.

Democrats said the bill would allow logging and road building in areas now without roads and sharply curtail public review of proposed timber-cutting projects.

Rep. Jared Huffman, D-Calif., called the measure "overreaching," saying it would impose mandatory production quotas for timber.

"I wish our Republican friends were more serious about funding the Forest Service and its fuel load reduction programs," he said in an interview. "They have slashed funding year after year, even as we've had more severe wildfires every year."



Grist.org
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 25 Comments: 948
#331 - JohnL - there's a problem with your link. Here's the right one Link

Thanks. Edited to say: finished with the field guide. Only wish I could arrange for these guys to be first in line..........
Member Since: January 6, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 2383

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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.