Greenhouse Emissions of Agriculture

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 6:25 AM GMT on July 27, 2013

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Greenhouse Emissions of Agriculture

In the last blog there was a comment by peregrinepickle on the emissions from agriculture. It started:

“It sounds like they may be putting the cart before the workhorse with this study. A 2010 survey of the literature found that too few studies on GHG emissions and the impact of various alternative farming practices have been done in US agricultural regions, including the Great plains Ironically, more research is being done in this vein in China. So it seems premature to appeal to US farmers re: willingness to adopt certain practices before knowing exactly where you are going with it.

Agriculture, compared to other sources, is not a huge contributor to GHGs, relative to the contributions by industry, transportation, and utilities. In the US farming is responsible for 6% of the overall emissions of the six major GHGs. However, farming does contribute about 25% of all CH4 emissions in the US, which is major, as this gas is 21-33 times more potent in warming potential than CO2.”

Back in April and May I wrote two entries on the emissions from agriculture (first entry, second entry). These two entries highlighted both the complexity of calculating the greenhouse emissions related to agriculture as well as suggested some of the controversy associated with the calculation. The controversy is especially high in the calculation associated with livestock.

The amount of direct fossil fuel emissions from use of fuels in machinery and pumps for agriculture is modest, as stated in peregrinepickle’s comment. Those numbers are based on a 2010 inventory by the Environmental Protection Agency. Here is a link to the chapter that details the agricultural inventory. The greenhouse gas emissions compiled in the chapter on agriculture are for greenhouse gases other than carbon dioxide, especially methane and nitrous oxide. For the EPA inventory, the carbon dioxide associated with agriculture is accounted for in the energy inventory. Additional emissions and removal of greenhouse gasses are calculated with land use, land change and forestry. The national forests are part of the Department of Agriculture.

The accounting with soils and forests influences, greatly, the budget of emissions associated with agriculture. Based on soil management agriculture can remove and store substantial amounts of greenhouse gases. In the U.S. agriculture is a mature and extensive enterprise, and we are not aggressively converting forest to agricultural land. In fact, the amount of forest is increasing and, therefore, can be accounted as an agricultural removal of carbon dioxide. This fact of increasing forest land is not the case in much of the world. World-wide, deforestation as forest is converted to agricultural use, especially rangeland, accounts for much of the carbon footprint of agriculture. Phil Robertson in an article to appear in the Encyclopedia of Agriculture estimates the total greenhouse gas footprint of agriculture is between 26 and 36 percent (thank you Professor Robertson). This range seems soundly based in the synthesis of research, and the number I would quote based on the current state of knowledge.

As detailed in Livestock’s Long Shadow and stated in the entirety of peregrinepickle’s comment, the impact of agriculture reaches far beyond the relevance to climate change. Notably there are impacts on water quality and land quality, and, in my opinion, the impact of nitrogen (fertilizer) pollution is one of the most under appreciated sources of environmental degradation. Management of this whole portfolio of environmental impacts is one of the special challenges of the agricultural sector of human activities.

The mix of greenhouse gas emissions, the details of the practice of land use, the role of biological processes, and the potential to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and store them in soil and biomass characterize the climate impact of agriculture. Agriculture is also vulnerable to climate change. Since agriculture is a highly competitive, market-dependent undertaking, market response to weather and climate can amplify weather-related impacts. Agriculture becomes more entangled with the climate problem, when we consider the possibility of biofuels to replace some of our fossil fuels. This complexity complicates the accounting of climate impacts, but also offers some of our best opportunities to improve our management of the environment. Agriculture is no doubt an important player in our management of climate change, and notably absent in President Obama recent speech on climate change.

A primary source of agricultural information is Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. An often cited document is the 2006 documentLivestock’s Long Shadow. There has been much criticism of this report, especially in its calculation of the emissions of the transportation sector. The original authors did modify their specific statements about transportation. As noted in an earlier blog in this series, there is substantial controversy about the impact of agriculture. Therefore, I end here with a set of reference materials that I have used.

EPA National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data

PDF of Agriculture Chapter of EPA Inventory of Emissions

Agriculture’s Role in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Chapter 8: Working Group 3: IPCC 2007

Energy Efficiency of Conventional, Organic and Alternative Cropping …

Livestock and Climate Change

and to appear

Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions and their Mitigation, G. Philip Robertson, W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and the Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI 49060

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Quoting 903. MisterPerfect:


Oh, so we distinguish credibility by awards do we?



well respected...LOL

largest bidder?

Funding

According to Discover the Networks, Mother Jones (through the Foundation for National Progress) has received funding from “the Bill Moyers-run Schumann Center for Media and Democracy, the Arca Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Streisand Foundation, the Irving Harris Foundation, Kansas City Community Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Park Foundation.

Mother Jones


I'll play, Groupsnoop, your "source" and I use that term loosely, was created by the National Center for Public Policy Research (NCPPR). Do you remember them? I do. They are the organization that got in trouble for illegally distributing money via the direction of Jack Abramoff.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 909. yonzabam:


Political and Internet deniers are frequently paid by the oil industry, which makes them a bit lower than mud dwelling pond life, imo.

What's your motivation?
Pretty obvious - he's obsessed with Al Gore. And not in a good way.

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Quoting 909. yonzabam:


Political and Internet deniers are frequently paid by the oil industry, which makes them a bit lower than mud dwelling pond life, imo.

What's your motivation?


I don't understand. What exactly are you saying I am denying?
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Ya gotta scuse some, they may be interning for RUSH.

LOL
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 419 Comments: 127377
Quoting 905. MisterPerfect:


hey, some scientists are paid by the graph...what ever pays the bills


Political and Internet deniers are frequently paid by the oil industry, which makes them a bit lower than mud dwelling pond life, imo.

What's your motivation?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 871. LAbonbon:


The actual author, Joe Fone, is an electronics technician and CAD designer, who writes freelance. Hmmm...if the author was a scientist of any sort, I'd give it at least some credibility.

Bio info from Amazon Link

Edit: Amazon, not Google


Joe Fone deserves no respect or credence. Below is a link to the kindle version of his book, if you scroll thru his introduction, you'll see that he acknowledges the infuence of Watts, Jonova, Steve McIntire, Tim Ball, Andrew Montford and other well known deniers. Basically the book is garbage.

Just scroll up to the acknowledgements Link
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too much comedy for one day...waiting for more Al Gore news to break...

gotta run, my motherjones is calling me for my vegan dinner and kool-aide
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Quoting 905. MisterPerfect:


hey, some scientists are paid by the graph...what ever pays the bills

Evidence?
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Quoting 902. Birthmark:

You should have at least checked it for content. I suspect he was paid by the word. lol


hey, some scientists are paid by the graph...what ever pays the bills
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Science,


S-c-i-e-n-c-e

The study, published Thursday in the Journal of Quaternary Science,
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 419 Comments: 127377
Quoting 893. Naga5000:


One is a very well respected magazine with awards, the other denies science for the largest bidder. Jokes...


Oh, so we distinguish credibility by awards do we?



well respected...LOL

largest bidder?

Funding

According to Discover the Networks, Mother Jones (through the Foundation for National Progress) has received funding from “the Bill Moyers-run Schumann Center for Media and Democracy, the Arca Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Streisand Foundation, the Irving Harris Foundation, Kansas City Community Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Park Foundation.

Mother Jones
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Quoting 896. MisterPerfect:


LOL..all is did was google search "global warming alarmists" and that "article" had a recent date on it.

the funniest thing is how bent out of shape you guys get. some phD writes a review of a book and you want to nail him to the cross. take a timeout dude. LOL


You should have at least checked it for content. I suspect he was paid by the word. lol
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Ahead of Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012, winds whip up waves along the East River on the eastside of Manhattan in New York City. Experts say sea level rise could play a bigger role in future storms like Sandy, according to a new report. (Michael Heiman/Getty Images)

Sea Level Rise to Play Bigger Role in NYC Storms: Study

Hurricane Sandy caused upward of $60 billion in damage, including an estimated $19 billion in damage and economic losses in New York City alone. Sea level rise played a relatively minor role in contributing to these losses.

However, a new study finds that that might not be the case for future storms, even those that pack less of a punch than Sandy.

The study, published Thursday in the Journal of Quaternary Science, also found that the record 13.88 foot storm tide Sandy brought to New York Harbor was driven more by the fact that the storm's strongest winds and peak surge arrived right as an astronomical high tide was peaking as well.

"The timing of a hurricane's landfall with respect to high tides and the individual meteorological conditions of each storm (i.e. the storm surge) are the dominant factors in determining flood height," said Ben Horton, one of the study's co-authors, in an email conversation. "But the additional sea-level rise from 1788 and 1821 to Sandy in 2012 exaggerated and caused (more) flooding."

Using marsh sediments from nearby Barnegat Bay, N.J., the researchers determined the relative sea level at The Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan rose by about 20.1 inches between a storm in 1788 and Hurricane Sandy.

Of this increase, about 6 inches was due to the gradual settling of the land, which has been ongoing since the end of the last Ice Age, with the remainder being the result of global warming.

The impact of sea level rise on storm surge flooding is similar to raising the floor of a basketball court. The higher the floor, the easier it is for players to dunk the ball, so that even shorter players will be able to dunk. However, the floor hasn't been raised that far yet.

In an interview, co-author Andrew Kemp, who now teaches at Tufts University, said the 20-inch decrease in flood height if Sandy had struck in 1788 is a "pretty small number compared to how big a storm tide can be."

But as oceans rise, more storms will be able to clear that bar with less help from tides. New York and other coastal cities will see more extensive flooding from weaker storms, while stronger storms will more easily set storm tide records.

In June, a New York City climate panel reported that sea levels could rise at a faster rate than was forecast just a few years ago. New York Harbor could see up to 11 inches of sea level rise by the 2020s, and up to or more than 2.5 feet of sea level rise by the 2050s.

"When it does happen . . . you're going to need smaller and smaller storms to overtop those thresholds as you go forward in time," Kemp said. According to revised flood maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, hundreds of thousands more New Yorkers have been placed in the 100-year floodplain compared to the maps that existed when Hurricane Sandy struck.

With sea level rise, the city expects that up to one-quarter of all New York City's land area, with 800,000 residents, will be in the floodplain.

"If we do nothing, more than 40 miles of our waterfront could see flooding on a regular basis, just during normal high tide," New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said while rolling out the city's post-Sandy climate resilience plan in June.

"We can think of these things as tipping points and sea level rise will cause them to be exceeded more often in the future because the baseline for hurricanes is raised and storms with smaller surges and not necessarily arriving on the highest tides will be able to overtop those physical structures," Horton said.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 419 Comments: 127377
Quoting 892. MisterPerfect:


yeah, mother jones isn't a politically oriented bias .org huh?

search The Foundation for National Progress

don't let the agenda deniers distort the truth

Actually, the URL is http://www.motherjones.com. All I can say is that Mother Jones played a big part in saving us from the Mittster and, for that, I will be eternally grateful.

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Quoting 896. MisterPerfect:


LOL..all is did was google search "global warming alarmists" and that "article" had a recent date on it.

the funniest thing is how bent out of shape you guys get. some phD writes a review of a book and you want to nail him to the cross. take a timeout dude. LOL



So what, you just came here to troll? Why don't you actually participate in the discussion and try to learn something instead of posting whatever inane article you find on google? Don't tell me to chill out, I'm cool. Maybe you should stop trying to distort science and read a book or two.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 892. MisterPerfect:


yeah, mother jones isn't a politically oriented bias .org huh?

search The Foundation for National Progress

don't let the agenda deniers distort the truth

I think you'll find that most of us here are persuaded by the scientific literature rather than periodicals, politicians, SIGs, or blogs.

I highly recommend it. Just use the time you currently allot to Gore-stalking.
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Quoting 887. Naga5000:


Politically oriented think tanks have inherent bias as to their political orientation. Heartland is vehemently anti-GW to be in line with the party, nothing more. And as of 2012 will not be holding their "International Conference on Climate Change" anymore. This is also the same group that lobbied for big tobacco in the 1990's, claiming there was no danger in second hand smoke, and gladly handed out tobacco industry friendly information. They have one of the poorest records on legitimate science in the world.


I don't disagree with any of that. I'm well aware of who they are and what they advocate.

Dr. Lehr's CV is legitimate, and unfortunately gives some level of credibility to an entity that is extremely partisan. However, by doing so, he himself has lost a lot of the credibility and respect he once held.

To the average observer, seeing HI's press release regarding Fone's book, it appears that the book is legitimate, in part due to Dr. Lehr's advocacy. And how are they to know?
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
Quoting 891. Naga5000:


So was Heartland handing out pro tobacco lobby information in the 1990's saying no harm came from second hand smoke. But whatever, believe the organization with one of the poorest track records on science and ignore and science, facts, or journalism. I'm sure that will turn out well. You must be really naive to disregard science and instead believe in the conservative think tank/blogosphere.


LOL..all is did was google search "global warming alarmists" and that "article" had a recent date on it.

the funniest thing is how bent out of shape you guys get. some phD writes a review of a book and you want to nail him to the cross. take a timeout dude. LOL

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Quoting 887. Naga5000:


Politically oriented think tanks have inherent bias as to their political orientation. Heartland is vehemently anti-GW to be in line with the party, nothing more. And as of 2012 will not be holding their "International Conference on Climate Change" anymore. This is also the same group that lobbied for big tobacco in the 1990's, claiming there was no danger in second hand smoke, and gladly handed out tobacco industry friendly information. They have one of the poorest records on legitimate science in the world.

Ideologues are like that. Take Lysenko, for instance.

"Lysenkoism (Russian: Лысе́нковщина), or Lysenko-Michurinism was the centralized political control exercised over genetics and agriculture by Trofim Lysenko and his followers. Lysenko was the director of the Soviet Union's Lenin All-Union Academy of Agricultural Sciences. Lysenkoism began in the late 1920s and formally ended in 1964."

The denialists like to throw around the "communist" label a lot (at other people), but they seem to have a lot in common with the communists themselves. They are ideologically strict and allow their ideology to prevail over reason.
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The great thing about Science is, it don't care if you believe, it jus is.

Climate Change

A scientific look at global change.



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 419 Comments: 127377
Quoting 892. MisterPerfect:


yeah, mother jones isn't a politically oriented bias .org huh?

search The Foundation for National Progress

don't let the agenda deniers distort the truth


One is a very well respected magazine with awards, the other denies science for the largest bidder. Jokes...
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 887. Naga5000:


Politically oriented think tanks have inherent bias as to their political orientation. Heartland is vehemently anti-GW to be in line with the party, nothing more. And as of 2012 will not be holding their "International Conference on Climate Change" anymore. This is also the same group that lobbied for big tobacco in the 1990's, claiming there was no danger in second hand smoke, and gladly handed out tobacco industry friendly information. They have one of the poorest records on legitimate science in the world.


yeah, mother jones isn't a politically oriented bias .org huh?

search The Foundation for National Progress

don't let the agenda deniers distort the truth
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 889. MisterPerfect:


LOL .. oh man, that's funny


So was Heartland handing out pro tobacco lobby information in the 1990's saying no harm came from second hand smoke. But whatever, believe the organization with one of the poorest track records on science and ignore the science, facts, and journalism. I'm sure that will turn out well. You must be really naive to disregard science and instead believe in the conservative think tank/blogosphere.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 886. bappit:

Irony can be great if you notice it and get people to think about it. Of course, Socrates was executed for that.

I expect no better fate. :)
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Quoting 880. Naga5000:

"

Mother Jones has been nominated for the industry's highest honor%u2015the National Magazine Award for General Excellence%u2015in each of the past four years, and has won twice. MoJo has also garnered a slew of other awards for its reporting, illustration, and photography, including:

In 2013, Mother Jones received four National Magazine Award nominations from the American Society of Magazine Editors, including one for General Excellence, ultimately winning in the category of video for David Corn's reporting of the "47 Percent" story.
The Society of Professional Journalists awarded Mother Jones the Sigma Delta Chi Award for "America Under the Gun: A Special Report on the Rise of Mass Shootings."
David Corn received the 2012 George Polk Award for Political Reporting for his reporting of the "47 Percent" story, joining the ranks of Edward R. Murrow, Carl Bernstein, Walter Kronkite, and Christiane Amanpour, who have all previously received the honor.
Mother Jones was named the winner of the fifth Izzy Award, presented by the Park Center for Independent Media, for publishing "Major, timely stories and investigations throughout 2012 that had significant public impact." The Izzy will be presented on Wed., April 17, at Ithaca College. Full release here.
Shane Bauer received the Sidney Hillman Foundation's Hillman Award, the James Aronson Award, a "Maggie" Award, the John Jay College/HF Guggenheim Prize for Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting for "No Way Out," and was named a finalist in the National Council on Crime and Delinquency's Media for a Just Society Awards for his investigation into solitary confinement practices in American prisons.
In 2013, Mother Jones received ten nominations for "Maggie" awards, winning four for Tom Philpott's "Food for Thought" blog, David Corn's "47 Percent" scoop, Kiera Butler's Econondrums columns "Should You Buy Beef to Help US Ranchers Survive the Drought?", and for Dale Stephanos' illustration for "Occupied Washington."
Gabriel Thompson received the David Pike Awards for reporting on poverty and homelessness for his story "Could You Survive on $2 a Day?"
The Society of Professional Designers bestowed the silver medal upon Steve Brodner for his "Follow the Dark Money" illustrations, and American Photography 29 named Mark Murrmann a finalist for his "Occupy Oakland" photography.
Four Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal excellence in journalism awards, including Outstanding Emerging Journalist, Andy Kroll; Feature Storytelling, "I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave"(March/April 2012), by Mac McClelland; Investigative Reporting, "The Informants"(September/October 2011), by Trevor Aaronson; Commentary, "Editors' Notes" (November/December 2011), by Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery.
Two Exceptional Merit in Media Award nominations from the National Women's Political Caucus: "The GOP's Stealth Plan to Redefine Rape," by Nick Baumann, and "South Dakota Moves to Legalize Killing Abortion Providers" by Kate Sheppard.
Finalist for two Online News Association Awards: Online Commentary, Kevin Drum, and the Gannett Foundation award for innovative investigative journalism, "Terrorists for the FBI."
American Illustration 31 chose Edel Rodriguez's illustration of Rick Perry from "No Country for Innocent Men," (January/February 2012) for inclusion in this annual edition.
2012 Planned Parenthood Maggie award for Sarah Blustain's "The Man Who Loved Women Too Much,"(January/February 2011).
2012 MOLLY National Journalism Prize for "The Informants," (September/October 2011).
2012 Data Journalism Award for Data-Driven Investigation, National/International, "Terrorists for the FBI."
Two Livingston Award for Young Journalists nominations: Trevor Aaronson, "The Informants," (September/October 2011), and Amy Silverstein, "Is Susan G. Komen Denying the BPA-Breast Cancer Link?" (January/February 2012).
Four Maggie awards from the Western Publishing Association, including Best Politics & Social Issues/Consumer for "The Speedup," (July/August 2011); Best Feature Article/Consumer for "Aftershocks," (January/February 2011); Best News Story/Consumer for "The Informants," (September/October 2011); Best Use of Social Media/Trade & Consumer for Occupy Wall Street coverage.
Two 2012 merit awards from the Society of Publication Designers for Best Illustration/Single or Spread, "Locked Up Abroad" (Sept/Oct 2011), and "The Job Killers," (Nov/Dec 2011).
Finalist for a 2012 Digital Ellie in Reporting, Digital Media from the American Society of Magazine Editors for team coverage of Occupy Wall Street.
An Award of Excellence in Feature Editing from Pictures of the Year International for "Exposing Vivian Maier,", May/June 2011.
A John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim 2012 Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award for Trevor Aaronson's "The Informants", September/October 2011.
Three Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal awards, including Explanatory Journalism for the "Speedup" package, July/August 2011; Feature Storytelling for Charlie LeDuff's "What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?", November/December 2010; and Best Photojournalism for Danny Wilcox Frazier's "What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?", November/December 2010.
National Magazine Award Best Feature Writing nomination for Mac McClelland's "For Us Surrender Is Out of the Question," March/April 2010.
Dayton Literary Peace Prize nomination for Mac McClelland's For Us Surrender Is Out of the Question," March/April 2010.
Two Maggies from the Western Publishing Association, including Best Web or Digital Edition Publication Blog for Kevin Drum, and Best Politics/Social Issues Consumer publication for the November/December 2010 issue.
Two Aveda Environmental awards for Best Overall Commitment and Best Paper/Printing.
A 2011 Society of Illustrators award for Ross MacDonald's "You, Only Better," January/February 2010 issue.
The 2010 Population Institute 31st Annual Global Media Awards for Excellence in Population Reporting in the category of Best Article or Series of Articles for the May/June 2010 issue.
Three 2010 Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal awards, including Breaking News for team coverage of the BP oil spill, Best Photojournalism for Marcus Bleasdale in "Blood and Treasure," and Outstanding Emerging Journalist Mac McClelland.
The 2010 Online News Association award for Online Topical Reporting for team reporting on the BP/Gulf oil spill.
The Sidney Hillman Foundation June 2010 "Sidney" Award for human rights reporter Mac McClelland and her story on the BP spill's impact on Gulf Coast residents.
The 2010 Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi public service award for the November/December 2009 "Climate Countdown" package.
Two 2010 American Illustration awards for Ross MacDonald's "You, Only Better," January/February 2010, and Alex Nabaum's "What's Your Water Footprint," July/August 2009.
TreeHugger.com's 2010 "Best of Green" award, Best Business and Politics Twitter Feed, for environmental reporter Kate Sheppard.
Three 2010 Society of Publication Designers SPOTS awards for Mark Matcho's "The Patriot's Guide to Legalization," July/August 2009; Roberto Parada's "The People vs. Dick Cheney," January/February 2009; and Gary Taxali's "Corn Syrup's Mercury Surprise," July/August 2009.
Four 2010 Society of Publication Designers merit awards for Dale Stephanos' "Don't Look Down," January/February 2009; Jack Unruh's "The Sheikh Down," September/October 2009; Roberto Parada's "The People vs. Dick Cheney," January/February 2009; and Steve Brodner's
"Presidents of the United States," January/February 2009.
The 2010 Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism for Scott Carney's "Meet the Parents," March/April 2009.
Two 2010 NPPA Best of Photography awards for magazine news story and magazine story opener for Danny Wilcox Frazier's "End of the Line," September/October 2009; honorable mention for magazine news story for Sarah Wilson's "We Bring Fear," July/August 2009; and 3rd place for Magazine Picture Editor of the Year for Mark Murrmann.
The 2010 Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism for reporter Stephanie Mencimer's "Brave New Welfare," January/February 2009.
The 2010 National Magazine Award for General Excellence (100,000-250,000 circulation) for the July/August 2009, September/October 2009, and November/December 2009 issues.
Four 2010 Western Publishing Association awards, including Best Web or Digital Edition Magazine Blog for Kevin Drum; Best Feature Article/Consumer for Anna Lenzer's "Spin the Bottle," January/February 2009; Best Cover/Consumer for "Totally Wasted," July/August 2009; Best Single Editorial Enhanced Photo or Illustration/Consumer for Andrew Zbihlyj's "Enter Stage Right," September/October 2009.
The 2010 James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for "Climate Countdown," November/December 2009.
Two 2009 Society of Illustrators awards for Mirko Ilic's "Seven Myths of Energy Independence," in the May/June 2008 issue, and Tim O'Brien's "The Last Empire" January/February 2008 cover.
Two 2009 American Illustration awards for the November/December 2008 issue: Steve Brodner's "Presidents of the United States" and Yarek Waszul's "The New ECOnomy".
The Western Publications Association's 2009 Maggie for Best Feature Article for Jacques Leslie's "The Last Empire," January/February 2008.
The 2008 National Magazine Award for General Excellence (100,000 to 250,000 circulation) for the March/April, May/June, and September/October 2007 issues."

Link

Mother Jones is journalism, Heartland is a conservative think tank.


LOL .. oh man, that's funny

somebody was stating ealier about the longest no-content post.
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Quoting 884. bappit:

Some identity issues there.

I'd like to believe shame is somehow involved, but that's probably too much to hope for. lol
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Quoting 881. LAbonbon:


Personally, I think they both can be biased. In regards to Dr. Lehr, I respect him in regards to his knowledge of groundwater hydrology. I don't always agree with his stances on environmental issues, but I do respect his knowledge in the area of geology/groundwater issues. By going to HI, it seems he's lost some of the credibility he had. He's gone from respected scientist to someone who's 'suspect' due to partisan policy issues.

Again, JMO.


Politically oriented think tanks have inherent bias as to their political orientation. Heartland is vehemently anti-GW to be in line with the party, nothing more. And as of 2012 will not be holding their "International Conference on Climate Change" anymore. This is also the same group that lobbied for big tobacco in the 1990's, claiming there was no danger in second hand smoke, and gladly handed out tobacco industry friendly information. They have one of the poorest records on legitimate science in the world.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 876. Birthmark:

And then they go on to tell us how any proposed fix for AGW will destroy civilization. Best of all, they fail to see the irony.

Irony can be great if you notice it and get people to think about it. Of course, Socrates was executed for that.
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Quoting 882. MisterPerfect:


I am not a denialist. :)

A denialist would actually care about what you say.

I've never seen evidence of that. The primary trait of a denialist is that they are immune to scientific fact. This is a trait that I've seen you display in this very thread.
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Quoting 879. Xandra:

And before that, your handle was "JBastardi".

Some identity issues there.
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883. yoboi
Quoting 879. Xandra:

And before that, your handle was "JBastardi".




221. JBastardi 5:58 PM GMT on December 01, 2011 +6
Science fair project invalidated "hockey schtick." What's really egregious is that the climate hucksters knew that the hockey stick graph was a fraud:

Link

Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Quoting 875. Birthmark:

That's true. I wish I could say I appreciated your effort, but I don't. That was a lot of band-width to say, "Nuh-uh!" A little evidence would have been nice.

But then, denialists don't really do valid evidence.


I am not a denialist. :)

A denialist would actually care about what you say.
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Quoting 874. MisterPerfect:
Heartland Institute gets knocked over like a bowling pin...but a post from mother jones is fine and dandy. no bias at all /sarcasm


Personally, I think they both can be biased. In regards to Dr. Lehr, I respect him in regards to his knowledge of groundwater hydrology. I don't always agree with his stances on environmental issues, but I do respect his knowledge in the area of geology/groundwater issues. By going to HI, it seems he's lost some of the credibility he had. He's gone from respected scientist to someone who's 'suspect' due to partisan policy issues.

Again, JMO.
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
Quoting 874. MisterPerfect:
Heartland Institute gets knocked over like a bowling pin...but a post from mother jones is fine and dandy. no bias at all /sarcasm

"

Mother Jones has been nominated for the industry's highest honor%u2015the National Magazine Award for General Excellence%u2015in each of the past four years, and has won twice. MoJo has also garnered a slew of other awards for its reporting, illustration, and photography, including:

In 2013, Mother Jones received four National Magazine Award nominations from the American Society of Magazine Editors, including one for General Excellence, ultimately winning in the category of video for David Corn's reporting of the "47 Percent" story.
The Society of Professional Journalists awarded Mother Jones the Sigma Delta Chi Award for "America Under the Gun: A Special Report on the Rise of Mass Shootings."
David Corn received the 2012 George Polk Award for Political Reporting for his reporting of the "47 Percent" story, joining the ranks of Edward R. Murrow, Carl Bernstein, Walter Kronkite, and Christiane Amanpour, who have all previously received the honor.
Mother Jones was named the winner of the fifth Izzy Award, presented by the Park Center for Independent Media, for publishing "Major, timely stories and investigations throughout 2012 that had significant public impact." The Izzy will be presented on Wed., April 17, at Ithaca College. Full release here.
Shane Bauer received the Sidney Hillman Foundation's Hillman Award, the James Aronson Award, a "Maggie" Award, the John Jay College/HF Guggenheim Prize for Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting for "No Way Out," and was named a finalist in the National Council on Crime and Delinquency's Media for a Just Society Awards for his investigation into solitary confinement practices in American prisons.
In 2013, Mother Jones received ten nominations for "Maggie" awards, winning four for Tom Philpott's "Food for Thought" blog, David Corn's "47 Percent" scoop, Kiera Butler's Econondrums columns "Should You Buy Beef to Help US Ranchers Survive the Drought?", and for Dale Stephanos' illustration for "Occupied Washington."
Gabriel Thompson received the David Pike Awards for reporting on poverty and homelessness for his story "Could You Survive on $2 a Day?"
The Society of Professional Designers bestowed the silver medal upon Steve Brodner for his "Follow the Dark Money" illustrations, and American Photography 29 named Mark Murrmann a finalist for his "Occupy Oakland" photography.
Four Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal excellence in journalism awards, including Outstanding Emerging Journalist, Andy Kroll; Feature Storytelling, "I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave"(March/April 2012), by Mac McClelland; Investigative Reporting, "The Informants"(September/October 2011), by Trevor Aaronson; Commentary, "Editors' Notes" (November/December 2011), by Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery.
Two Exceptional Merit in Media Award nominations from the National Women's Political Caucus: "The GOP's Stealth Plan to Redefine Rape," by Nick Baumann, and "South Dakota Moves to Legalize Killing Abortion Providers" by Kate Sheppard.
Finalist for two Online News Association Awards: Online Commentary, Kevin Drum, and the Gannett Foundation award for innovative investigative journalism, "Terrorists for the FBI."
American Illustration 31 chose Edel Rodriguez's illustration of Rick Perry from "No Country for Innocent Men," (January/February 2012) for inclusion in this annual edition.
2012 Planned Parenthood Maggie award for Sarah Blustain's "The Man Who Loved Women Too Much,"(January/February 2011).
2012 MOLLY National Journalism Prize for "The Informants," (September/October 2011).
2012 Data Journalism Award for Data-Driven Investigation, National/International, "Terrorists for the FBI."
Two Livingston Award for Young Journalists nominations: Trevor Aaronson, "The Informants," (September/October 2011), and Amy Silverstein, "Is Susan G. Komen Denying the BPA-Breast Cancer Link?" (January/February 2012).
Four Maggie awards from the Western Publishing Association, including Best Politics & Social Issues/Consumer for "The Speedup," (July/August 2011); Best Feature Article/Consumer for "Aftershocks," (January/February 2011); Best News Story/Consumer for "The Informants," (September/October 2011); Best Use of Social Media/Trade & Consumer for Occupy Wall Street coverage.
Two 2012 merit awards from the Society of Publication Designers for Best Illustration/Single or Spread, "Locked Up Abroad" (Sept/Oct 2011), and "The Job Killers," (Nov/Dec 2011).
Finalist for a 2012 Digital Ellie in Reporting, Digital Media from the American Society of Magazine Editors for team coverage of Occupy Wall Street.
An Award of Excellence in Feature Editing from Pictures of the Year International for "Exposing Vivian Maier,", May/June 2011.
A John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim 2012 Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award for Trevor Aaronson's "The Informants", September/October 2011.
Three Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal awards, including Explanatory Journalism for the "Speedup" package, July/August 2011; Feature Storytelling for Charlie LeDuff's "What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?", November/December 2010; and Best Photojournalism for Danny Wilcox Frazier's "What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?", November/December 2010.
National Magazine Award Best Feature Writing nomination for Mac McClelland's "For Us Surrender Is Out of the Question," March/April 2010.
Dayton Literary Peace Prize nomination for Mac McClelland's For Us Surrender Is Out of the Question," March/April 2010.
Two Maggies from the Western Publishing Association, including Best Web or Digital Edition Publication Blog for Kevin Drum, and Best Politics/Social Issues Consumer publication for the November/December 2010 issue.
Two Aveda Environmental awards for Best Overall Commitment and Best Paper/Printing.
A 2011 Society of Illustrators award for Ross MacDonald's "You, Only Better," January/February 2010 issue.
The 2010 Population Institute 31st Annual Global Media Awards for Excellence in Population Reporting in the category of Best Article or Series of Articles for the May/June 2010 issue.
Three 2010 Society of Professional Journalists-NorCal awards, including Breaking News for team coverage of the BP oil spill, Best Photojournalism for Marcus Bleasdale in "Blood and Treasure," and Outstanding Emerging Journalist Mac McClelland.
The 2010 Online News Association award for Online Topical Reporting for team reporting on the BP/Gulf oil spill.
The Sidney Hillman Foundation June 2010 "Sidney" Award for human rights reporter Mac McClelland and her story on the BP spill's impact on Gulf Coast residents.
The 2010 Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi public service award for the November/December 2009 "Climate Countdown" package.
Two 2010 American Illustration awards for Ross MacDonald's "You, Only Better," January/February 2010, and Alex Nabaum's "What's Your Water Footprint," July/August 2009.
TreeHugger.com's 2010 "Best of Green" award, Best Business and Politics Twitter Feed, for environmental reporter Kate Sheppard.
Three 2010 Society of Publication Designers SPOTS awards for Mark Matcho's "The Patriot's Guide to Legalization," July/August 2009; Roberto Parada's "The People vs. Dick Cheney," January/February 2009; and Gary Taxali's "Corn Syrup's Mercury Surprise," July/August 2009.
Four 2010 Society of Publication Designers merit awards for Dale Stephanos' "Don't Look Down," January/February 2009; Jack Unruh's "The Sheikh Down," September/October 2009; Roberto Parada's "The People vs. Dick Cheney," January/February 2009; and Steve Brodner's
"Presidents of the United States," January/February 2009.
The 2010 Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism for Scott Carney's "Meet the Parents," March/April 2009.
Two 2010 NPPA Best of Photography awards for magazine news story and magazine story opener for Danny Wilcox Frazier's "End of the Line," September/October 2009; honorable mention for magazine news story for Sarah Wilson's "We Bring Fear," July/August 2009; and 3rd place for Magazine Picture Editor of the Year for Mark Murrmann.
The 2010 Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism for reporter Stephanie Mencimer's "Brave New Welfare," January/February 2009.
The 2010 National Magazine Award for General Excellence (100,000-250,000 circulation) for the July/August 2009, September/October 2009, and November/December 2009 issues.
Four 2010 Western Publishing Association awards, including Best Web or Digital Edition Magazine Blog for Kevin Drum; Best Feature Article/Consumer for Anna Lenzer's "Spin the Bottle," January/February 2009; Best Cover/Consumer for "Totally Wasted," July/August 2009; Best Single Editorial Enhanced Photo or Illustration/Consumer for Andrew Zbihlyj's "Enter Stage Right," September/October 2009.
The 2010 James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for "Climate Countdown," November/December 2009.
Two 2009 Society of Illustrators awards for Mirko Ilic's "Seven Myths of Energy Independence," in the May/June 2008 issue, and Tim O'Brien's "The Last Empire" January/February 2008 cover.
Two 2009 American Illustration awards for the November/December 2008 issue: Steve Brodner's "Presidents of the United States" and Yarek Waszul's "The New ECOnomy".
The Western Publications Association's 2009 Maggie for Best Feature Article for Jacques Leslie's "The Last Empire," January/February 2008.
The 2008 National Magazine Award for General Excellence (100,000 to 250,000 circulation) for the March/April, May/June, and September/October 2007 issues."

Link

Mother Jones is journalism, Heartland is a conservative think tank.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 837. CEastwood:

Also, I wasn't banned. I was asked to change my "handle", which I did out of courtesy to another member of the blog, who will remain unnamed. I was formerly known as "NeapolitanFan" [...]

And before that, your handle was "JBastardi".
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878. yoboi
Quoting 874. MisterPerfect:
Heartland Institute gets knocked over like a bowling pin...but a post from mother jones is fine and dandy. no bias at all /sarcasm



One is far right and one is far left........
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Quoting 874. MisterPerfect:
Heartland Institute gets knocked over like a bowling pin...but a post from mother jones is fine and dandy. no bias at all /sarcasm

Do you dispute the existence of Valley Fever?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 873. FLwolverine:
Credulous seems to describe someone who believes whatever they are told. CEastwood believes only what he wants to believe. I think I'll go with ... umm.. what I said earlier.

BTW I read #852. Have you ever noticed how there's no middle ground for most deniers? They can't say, yes, there's a problem but some people are exaggerating; they say there's no problem and you people are alarmists!

And then they go on to tell us how any proposed fix for AGW will destroy civilization. Best of all, they fail to see the irony.
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Quoting 872. MisterPerfect:


the postman isn't the only guy who brings junk mail :)

That's true. I wish I could say I appreciated your effort, but I don't. That was a lot of band-width to say, "Nuh-uh!" A little evidence would have been nice.

But then, denialists don't really do valid evidence.
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Heartland Institute gets knocked over like a bowling pin...but a post from mother jones is fine and dandy. no bias at all /sarcasm
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Quoting 854. Birthmark:

I think "credulous" would be the better word in this particular instance.
Credulous seems to describe someone who believes whatever they are told. CEastwood believes only what he wants to believe. I think I'll go with ... umm.. what I said earlier.

BTW I read #852. Have you ever noticed how there's no middle ground for most deniers? They can't say, yes, there's a problem but some people are exaggerating; they say there's no problem and you people are alarmists!
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Quoting 861. Birthmark:

That might be the longest content-free post I've seen on this blog. Literally, no content at all. There isn't even anything to rebut. LOL


the postman isn't the only guy who brings junk mail :)
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Quoting 858. Naga5000:


Heartland Institute...lol. Clearly not biased. /sarcasm


The actual author, Joe Fone, is an electronics technician and CAD designer, who writes freelance. Hmmm...if the author was a scientist of any sort, I'd give it at least some credibility.

Bio info from Amazon Link

Edit: Amazon, not Google
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
Quoting 856. SouthernIllinois:

Any chance this ice comes back. Been hearing a lot that the next 10 years or so we should see a modest comeback. We won't be anywhere near where we were in 1979 though. Those days are gone. But it seems to me with a comeback that may only postpone the completely ice free Arctic. Thoughts?

I agree with your thoughts. There may be negative feedbacks, of which we're currently unaware, that might delay an ice-free summer Arctic --but stopping it or reversing it requires nothing less than overturning some fairly basic physics or a meteor impact of cataclysmic proportions.

The Arctic will likely see its first ice-free day within the decade. (I picked 2017 out of a hat a few years ago. It looks like it was a good pick.)

It should also be noted that this is an area where the models have performed very poorly. The models, for the most part, predict the ice to hang on until anywhere from the late 2030s to the 2070s. Of course, they may be right yet, but it's tough to believe.
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Quoting 855. yoboi:



why would NOAA do that??????


They absolutely would NOT do that.
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
868. yoboi
Eastwood what is your message concerning AGW???????
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
867. yoboi
Quoting 862. Birthmark:

It's not. It's another denialist fantasy based on misrepresentation.


can you explain the misrepresentation?????


edit naga explained...
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2325
Quoting 845. SouthernIllinois:
Why are we so fixated on the Arctic? That's only a small percentage of the globe. Look at the globe as a WHOLE. The data will tell you it is getting warmer.
SI, I've been confused by some of your comments on Dr M's blog, because I remember you agreeing on here that the earth is getting warmer. So I'm wondering: how big a problem do you think the warming is? What consequences do you think are coming?

Maybe you are coming at this from a different angle than Naga and Birthmark and others (including me). Maybe you don't see global warming and climate change as the same kind of major threat that we do.
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Quoting 855. yoboi:



why would NOAA do that??????


They haven't. They have continued to revise raw station data that was glaringly incorrect. This argument is not real, Yoboi, but created by those looking for anything to dispute the evidence of AGW. Here you go, along with links to the methodology used. Link
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3219
Quoting 855. yoboi:



why would NOAA do that??????

They wouldn't and they didn't.
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Dr. Antje Lauer: "When global warming continues we will see more cases of Valley fever".

From Mother Jones:

Mystery Lung Fungus: Are You at Risk?

Valley fever is hard to diagnose, even harder to treat, and potentially fatal—and the number of cases is rising dramatically.

By Kiera Butler and Brett Brownell



Karen Deeming was a healthy 48-year-old living in Los Banos, California, and working on her master's degree in anthropology and archaeology. Then, in late 2012, a few weeks after returning from a dig in Mariposa, California, Karen began to feel sick. A chest x-ray turned up bilteral pneumonia and masses in her lungs.

What followed was eight months of debilitating illness. And she's not better yet.

If you suspect that Karen had lung cancer, you're wrong. She had something else—and she isn't alone. Cases of her illness are on the rise: In 1998, there were 2,000. In 2011, there were around 23,000.

To find out what Karen's illness is—and whether you're at risk—watch the video above.
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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.