Personal and Public Barriers in Responding to Climate Change

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 1:28 AM GMT on March 14, 2013

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Personal and Public Barriers in Responding to Climate Change

I want to continue on the subject of barriers to the use of information about climate change. In last week’s entry, I wrote about barriers like engineering standards and permitting processes that have not evolved to the point that they are flexible enough to take a changing climate into account. I ended with language barriers and how the political and emotional responses to climate-change knowledge influence language. For example, perhaps it is impossible to talk to city politicians about adaptation to climate change but possible to talk about vulnerability of their seashore to the increasing storm surges of the past 20 years. There is an aspect to the language barriers that is purely political. This charging of language with political purpose happens in any contentious process where there are advocates of different points of view.

I want to leave those political barriers in the realm of hopeless irrationality and explore more general barriers. There has been an enormous amount of effort to communicate about the science of climate change and global warming. I have argued before that polling data suggest that as a community we have actually done quite well in this communication path. A large majority of Americans think that global warming is real and concerning. Recent polling data suggest that a growing number of people are alarmed about climate change (Six Americas in September 2012). Yet there remains the general perception that, as a whole, we are not doing anything. One response to this is to communicate more, to educate more, with the idea that in a participatory democracy such as ours, the ultimate solution comes from the public’s demanding a policy response.

This experience suggests that there must be barriers to the public response of this knowledge of climate change. Often in environmental problems, people identify cost and inconvenience as barriers – think about recycling. In some instances, we try to reduce these barriers through policy to offset the cost or to improve convenience. A couple of years ago, for example, there were many programs of reduced cost or free distribution of compact fluorescent light bulbs. These bulbs use less energy, reducing carbon dioxide emissions and helping slow climate change (EPA on compact fluorescents). This is a typical approach that focuses on personal behavior, using essentially marketing techniques. Such approaches can be effective, but generally in a piecemeal way (Meeting Environmental Challenges).

In 2009, a group of my students looked into more systematic ways to instill the use of climate-change knowledge in day-to-day life. Their particular focus was on sustainable communities. They did a lot of analysis of energy and water use, house design, and transportation and then developed guidelines. But one of the ideas that they had in that document was the use of community associations and civic organizations to both promote and provide incentives to take behavior normally associated with individuals and to extend that behavior to communities. There were also ideas to extend across communities through, for example, competitive marketing techniques. One goal of such a strategy is to help reduce the reluctance that individuals might have to taking action in the absence of their neighbors, their social network.

An important finding from this work on building sustainable communities is that knowledge, even in combination with a receptive attitude towards sustainability, is not a strong predictor of whether or not individuals will alter their behavior to take action. Perhaps one could conclude that there is just too much anchoring in our old behavior to change. I know that I will drive by the ATM that takes deposits 10 times, thinking that the branch office has to be open to make a deposit. Perhaps reluctance to act is a matter of cost and convenience; yet in polls of those people with the positive sustainability attitude, they’re willing to pay more and be inconvenienced. These real barriers, small and large, in total retard our response to climate change.

Returning to the beginning and to the idea that communicating and educating more completely will motivate action. Though necessary, this is not sufficient. What is obvious is that there is a convergence of items that motivate any individual to take action. This is formalized in a paper by Hines and others in 1987 entitled Analysis and Synthesis of Research on Responsible Environmental Behavior. In this work, they pose that, in addition to knowledge, there is a need for information about what to do with that knowledge and training on the skills of how to use that knowledge. They state specifically, “The erroneous assumption is often made that skills evolve naturally from knowledge.” These knowledge and skill bases then need to come together with personality factors, including attitude and perhaps situational factors that become motivators for action.

Though this work does not suggest that there is an easy formula for breaking down these barriers, it does suggest training on what to do with the knowledge and the skills on how to do it are as important as the knowledge itself. With an accompanying structure of practice, there is an increased probability that people will take action, which should then beget more action.



Figure 1: Model of Responsible Environmental Behavior – Adapted from Hines and others in 1987 entitled Analysis and Synthesis of Research on Responsible Environmental Behavior. An individual who expresses an intention to take action will be more likely to engage in the action than will an individual who expresses no such intention. However, it appears that intention to act is merely an artifact of a number of other factors acting in combination. Before an individual can intentionally act on a particular environmental problem, that individual must be cognizant of the existence of the problem; this is prerequisite to action. However, an individual must also possess knowledge of those courses of action that are available and will be most effective in a given situation.


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Quoting allahgore:


Ok thought working at NASA would be a good thing.
Not true. Spencer and Hanson would be good examples of this. Well back to the tournaments. BBL
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Quoting allahgore:
Is Dr Roy Spencer respected?
Not by the climate science community at large. (Being listed as an expert by the uber-denialist fossil fuel-funded Heartland Institute alone is enough to cause that loss of respect.)
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Quoting nymore:
Perhaps they did listen to the masses as far as it pertains to the pipeline. Pew Research Poll just last month has 66% for it and 23% against it or basically 3 to 1 for it
I was being meta; a majority of Americans support doing something about climate change, and don't believe we should place corporate profits above the environment. (That so many have been hoodwinked by the fossil fuel industry into not making the obvious connection between extracting Tar Sands and the imminent demise of civilization is an issue of which an informed policymaker should be aware.)
Quoting NeapolitanFan:


But before they said snow would increase, they said it would disappear. Good thing you have a selective memory. Now, "climate change" makes it snow and makes it not snow. Everything that happens in weather is due to "climate change." It would be funny, if it weren't so sad.
Well, as you may be aware, every current weather event is taking place in our warmer, more energetic atmosphere, so you're almost right; it's entirely true to say that everything that's happening in weather is influenced by (not, as you noted, "due to") climate change.
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Quoting pintada:
It is important for people to bear their anxieties, because when they do not, their thinking deteriorates, and irrationality, lack of proportionality, hatred and narcissism are more likely to prevail.

I'll give a shout out to the closing sentence, too.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Lots of expected Blue Dogs in there, along with a few others who would never vote against fossil fuel interests in their respective states (Manchin, etc.) But, still, as with firearm background checks, it's very disappointing to see policymakers ignore the voices of the masses and listen to only the money-slinging industry loudmouths down in the lobby...
Perhaps they did listen to the masses as far as it pertains to the pipeline. Pew Research Poll just last month has 66% for it and 23% against it or basically 3 to 1 for it
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Quoting pintada:
In disavowal reality is more accepted, but its significance is minimized. “True denial” requires the special paradox of knowing and not-knowing ... disavowal is a more serious and intractable form of denial. Negation is a more transient defense and can be a first step towards accepting the painful reality of climate change. And, while negation says no to the truth, it does not distort the truth. Disavowal, by contrast, can be highly organized at an unconscious level and can become entrenched.

Interesting post. I quoted just this part to emphasize the disavowal part. Boy have I ever seen the disavowal state of mind on Dr. Masters' blog the last few years. People in a disavowal state try to come across as having an earnest desire to find the real truth.

I can empathize with denial. For instance, an acquaintance recently told me they did not want to see pictures of cracks in the arctic sea ice because it might keep them awake worrying about it. The first category, denialism to me is fairly transparent on the blogs. It is unpleasant, but I don't think it fools a lot of people--except for the people in the disavowal state. They seem like a ready tool that the propagandists can stir into action to create confusion. Meanwhile the disavowal types are so busy trying to just be helpful.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
December in Europe

It would seem that all those climate scientists who predicted that warming would bring about an increase in both the severity and frequency of extreme weather events pretty much hit the nail on the head, wouldn't you say?


But before they said snow would increase, they said it would disappear. Good thing you have a selective memory. Now, "climate change" makes it snow and makes it not snow. Everything that happens in weather is due to "climate change." It would be funny, if it weren't so sad.
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Quoting allahgore:


thanks for the info. trying to understand regional projections sorry if it seems silly to you. I am slowly learning whom on here would like to teach and whom likes to just bash people and argue.

One way to approach that is if you had a specific question, for example, "how do climate scientists make regional climate projections?" and you felt people missed it or were not answering it, you could politely re-ask your question the following way:
"A few days ago I posted a question about regional climate projections, and it may have gotten lost in the shuffle. Does anyone know where i could start finding out more about this?"

You might be surprised how willing and able people are to help you when you type in that way instead of using passive-aggressive language mixed with accusations.
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[Good Neeeewwwws Everyone! Its Chapter 3 of Weintrobe!


As usual my words are in brackets, most of the book report is block copies of the authors text. In chapter one, we learned that psychoanalysts identify 3 types of denial:]
Three forms of denial: denialism, negation and disavowal
1. Denialism involves campaigns of misinformation about climate change, funded by commercial and ideological interests. [See Greedy Lying Bastards]

2. Negation involves saying that something that is, is not. Negation defends against feelings of anxiety and loss and is often resorted to when the first shock of a painful reality makes it too much to bear, for now, all in one go.

3. In disavowal reality is more accepted, but its significance is minimized. “True denial” requires the special paradox of knowing and not-knowing ... disavowal is a more serious and intractable form of denial. Negation is a more transient defense and can be a first step towards accepting the painful reality of climate change. And, while negation says no to the truth, it does not distort the truth. Disavowal, by contrast, can be highly organized at an unconscious level and can become entrenched.

[In chapter 2 denialism was explored in depth:]

In 1997 there was virtually no difference between Democratic and Republican voters in their views on global warming, with around half saying warming had begun. In 2008, reflecting the accumulation and dissemination of scientific evidence, the proportion of Democratic voters taking this view had risen from 52% to 76% (Maibach, Roser-Renouf and Leiserowitz 2009). But the proportion of Republican voters fell from 48% to 42% – a 4% gap had become a 34% gap. What had happened? The opening of the gulf was due to the fact that Republican Party activists, in collaboration with fossil fuel interests and conservative think tanks, had successfully associated acceptance of global warming science with ‘liberal’ views.

Chapter 3 - The difficult problem of anxiety in thinking about climate change (Sally Weintrobe)

Being able to bear anxiety is a vital part of being able to face reality, as we know that when anxiety becomes too much to bear, our thinking can become irrational and start to lack proportion.

The psychoanalytic model that underpins my understanding of anxiety is that we are inherently in conflict between different parts of ourselves, that much of the conflict goes on at an unconscious level and that the biggest conflict we face in life is between the concerned part of us that loves reality and the more narcissistic, vain part of us that hates reality when it thwarts our wishes or deflates our view of ourselves.

The narcissistic part that hates reality feels ideal and special and is prone to omnipotent thinking. It uses magical ‘quick fixes’ to try to restore its sense of being ideal when reality brings disillusionment. It expects admiration – indeed adoration – for its ‘quick fixes’.

[When the anxiety gets too great we turn to negation and disavowal rather than the more normal mourning.

The author lists three defences against anxiety:]
1. Feeling magically big and powerful
When we see people behaving in ways we identify as muscle flexing, as feeling a bit god-like and as being out of touch with real worries and real concern, it is important to bear in mind that they may be defending themselves against feeling acutely anxious, a feeling that may be too difficult to bear.

2. Projection
Another way to deal with too much anxiety is to project it onto or into another or others.

Denial
Denial is a commonly used defence. It tries to get rid of reality altogether by maintaining that it is not there. We only deny things we have already seen, even if only dimly or out of the corner of one eye. The denial is aimed at protecting us from the anxiety and from the pain of impending loss and change that would follow if we did accept reality in a felt and owned way. ... to two different sorts of denial: negation and disavowal. It is crucial to distinguish the two, as negation is more likely to be a stage on the way to mourning illusions and accepting reality. ... with disavowal, unreality and irrationality are not only more likely to prevail but may, indeed, escalate.

Brenman (1985) discussed the way that arrogance is accompanied by single-minded exploitative greed, and I (Weintrobe 2004) have discussed the way it is accompanied by a sense of narcissistic entitlement to exploit the other, with the ‘justification’ of being ideal, superior and special. With arrogance, a destructively narcissistic part of the psyche has gained the upper hand in a power struggle with the part that feels wedded to reality.

When we think of a hateful destructive attack, we imagine something active and violent. It is more difficult to see that disavowal – which, after all, apparently ‘deals with’ anxiety and apparently keeps all negative effects to a minimum – can conceal great hidden violence while being quite split off from its effects.

Triumph is an important part of disavowal. The arrogant omnipotent part of the self feels very clever for being able to ‘solve’ painful problems so instantly. The delusion that nothing is lost because loss itself has no meaning is perhaps the ultimate triumph. Disavowal is also artful. It can cleverly bend, reverse and warp the truth, and fraudulent thinking flourishes in this state of mind.

[“Victories” in fora!!]

The splitting that occurs with disavowal also leads to a breakdown of proportionality in thinking. Anxiety is minimized, guilt and shame – emotions that also cause us great anxiety – are minimized, and all this is achieved through omnipotent thinking. But human nature does not work this way. When a problem is minimized and ridiculed, the sane part of the mind – which is always there, even if eclipsed and made small – becomes increasingly anxious. The arrogant part of the mind also becomes increasingly anxious, but for different reasons.

Disavowal leads to a vicious spiral, and this makes it dangerous. What might cause disavowal to set in? Clinical experience suggests that the following conditions apply: the reality has become too obvious to be ignored, there is anxiety that damage is too great to be repaired, it is felt that there is not enough help, support and containment to bear the anxiety and suffering that insight brings and there is anxiety that parts of the self will not survive change that now feels catastrophic and too much to face.

We are profoundly influenced socially as to what is to be deemed rational and irrational. It is truly startling to think about how much in society is flagrantly irrational and how much we avoid really wanting to know this. If those in power tell us irrational things aimed at reducing our anxiety, we may go along with this and find it seductive. However, it only leads to the build-up of underlying depressive anxiety, including that we may have damaged our capacity to think clearly.

We truly hate fully to register the depth of our dependence on nature and our attachment to nature. We much prefer to see ourselves as the exploiting King of the Castle with the Earth as the exploited and controlled Dirty Rascal. But without a bountiful and flourishing Earth we are lost and deeply anxious. Deep down I suggest most people know this, at least unconsciously. This is the annihilation anxiety that Välimäki and Lehtonen (2009) have suggested we are now having to find ways to live with.

Starting with our depressive anxieties, they can all cause traumatic levels of ‘too much’ anxiety. They include first, that we need a healthy biosphere to stay alive, and the biosphere is already showing signs consistent with predictions of effects of climate change. Second, we face the loss of a predictable future and, potentially, the loss of any future. Third, leadership is not acting sufficiently to protect us; deep down we know this, and it is traumatic to feel so uncared for. Fourth, we are realistically anxious about the destructiveness of the arrogant side of our own nature,

We depend on our leaders in the current situation, and this introduces further anxiety. ... we know that our leaders are not looking after us. We see them, too, pulled in by and in the power of commercial lobbyists and pressure groups with interests destructive to the Earth and all its human and non-human inhabitants. The message – and I suggest we do hear it – is that we are not cared for at the level of our very survival. To feel this uncared for is deeply traumatic and can also lead to unbearable anxiety, born of a feeling of helplessness and aloneness in the face of survival threats.

As climate change progresses and its effects become ever more visible, unless greater support for facing reality is given and unless group identification with a stance of arrogant entitlement is challenged to a greater extent, we can expect disavowal to be the prevalent defence against the ‘too-much-ness’ of the reality. Inaction on climate change does not only lead to soaring levels of CO2e emissions. It may lead to spiralling disavowal.

Anxiety is, I suggest, the biggest psychic barrier to facing the reality of anthropogenic global warming. ... It is important for people to bear their anxieties, because when they do not, their thinking deteriorates, and irrationality, lack of proportionality, hatred and narcissism are more likely to prevail.



Weintrobe, Sally (2012-10-12). Engaging with Climate Change: Psychoanalytic and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (New Library of Psychoanalysis 'Beyond the Couch' series) . Taylor & Francis.
Member Since: July 15, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 234
Quoting Neapolitan:
Lots of expected Blue Dogs in there, along with a few others who would never vote against fossil fuel interests in their respective states (Manchin, etc.) But, still, as with firearm background checks, it's very disappointing to see policymakers ignore the voices of the masses and listen to only the money-slinging industry loudmouths down in the lobby...


Manchin wouldn't need a new job if he voted against fossl fuels, he would need a whole new life and witness protection. In the land of union wars, horizontal drilling and fracking, Coal is king. It is sad, though, to see all of them sell out to Big Oil.
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Re 584. Drat! Hit the minus instead of the plus. Sorry about that. I appreciate the clarification also.
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Quoting Skyepony:
Democratic Senators who voted for the Keystone amendment

Baucus (D-MT)
Begich (D-AK)
Bennet (D-CO)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Hagan (D-NC)
Heitkamp (D-ND)
Johnson (D-SD)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Manchin (D-WV)
McCaskill (D-MO)
Nelson (D-FL)
Pryor (D-AR)
Tester (D-MT)
Warner (D-VA)

Lots of expected Blue Dogs in there, along with a few others who would never vote against fossil fuel interests in their respective states (Manchin, etc.) But, still, as with firearm background checks, it's very disappointing to see policymakers ignore the voices of the masses and listen to only the money-slinging industry loudmouths down in the lobby...
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Quoting Skyepony:
Democratic Senators who voted for the Keystone amendment

Baucus (D-MT)
Begich (D-AK)
Bennet (D-CO)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Hagan (D-NC)
Heitkamp (D-ND)
Johnson (D-SD)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Manchin (D-WV)
McCaskill (D-MO)
Nelson (D-FL)
Pryor (D-AR)
Tester (D-MT)
Warner (D-VA)



Not surprising, but I'm always disappointed to see our very own Bill Nelson on the list.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3960
589. Skyepony (Mod)
The first Keystone pipeline, already operating in America, has spilled 14 times and had to be shut down twice due to safety concerns, and another one of its pipelines exploded.
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588. Skyepony (Mod)
Democratic Senators who voted for the Keystone amendment

Baucus (D-MT)
Begich (D-AK)
Bennet (D-CO)
Carper (D-DE)
Casey (D-PA)
Coons (D-DE)
Donnelly (D-IN)
Hagan (D-NC)
Heitkamp (D-ND)
Johnson (D-SD)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Manchin (D-WV)
McCaskill (D-MO)
Nelson (D-FL)
Pryor (D-AR)
Tester (D-MT)
Warner (D-VA)

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I really wonder whether this will work. Nice and hopefully smart idea.


This shows the back side of the house, averted from the sun, under construction.

Algae facade makes house truly 'green'

Published: 20 Mar 13 07:32 CET

An innovating new building in the northern German city of Hamburg is hoping to harvest heat from its algae-covered facade. Jeff Kavanagh reports.

For many of us, the concept of living in a place with stuff growing on its walls won't necessarily be foreign. What will be unusual for those who have experienced the joys of residing in damp student flats and first homes away from the parental nest, however, is the idea that microorganisms flourishing on your walls is a good thing.

This is precisely the logic at work in the construction of a state-of-the-art apartment building in the once rundown, but increasingly trendy riverside quarter of Wilhelmsburg in Hamburg. Clad on its two south-facing sides with a transparent shell housing millions of microalgae, the five-storey Bio Intelligence Quotient (BIQ) house has been designed to harness heat generated by the microscopic plants and use it to warm building's 15 apartments.

Know as a "bioreactor facade", the shell works on the principle that the microalgae, most no bigger than bacteria, are cultivated through the supply of sunlight, liquid nutrients and CO2, a process that produces heat.


Read the whole article




Schemes from a German site

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..
Member Since: July 15, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 234
Quoting RTLSNK:


No, it is not "what it is".

Verbal personal attacks are not allowed on this website.

You continue to verbally attack other bloggers.

When you do that you will be banned and your comment will be removed.

You need to talk about the "SCIENCE" and stop talking about other bloggers.

It is really "that simple".



Thanks for the clarification, RTLSNK. Much appreciated.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3960
Quoting allahgore:


nea seems smart about climate change but the way he talks down to people makes me feel combative then when you confront him he never gets banned there is bias here. it is what it is.


No, it is not "what it is".

Verbal personal attacks are not allowed on this website.

You continue to verbally attack other bloggers.

When you do that you will be banned and your comment will be removed.

You need to talk about the "SCIENCE" and stop talking about other bloggers.

It is really "that simple".

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Quoting allahgore:


nea seems smart about climate change but the way he talks down to people makes me feel combative then when you confront him he never gets banned there is bias here. it is what it is.
If Nea's answers make you feel combative, that's your issue, not his, and it's no excuse to pick pick pick away at him like you are starting to do.

And notice I said pick AT him, not pick on him. Some people on here read rather selectively.

BTW, My son writes code for one of the biggest digital agencies in the world. I told him about your comment comparing Google unfavorably to Bing, and he laughed and said, Google is so superior. FYI
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Quoting greentortuloni:
Sorry, I just thought I'd go ahead and finish the whole argument without the time delay.


I dont do debates anymore, and the reason i don't do debates anymore is I don't have to ... everything we said was going to happen is taking place right now.
- Michael Ruppert
Member Since: July 15, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 234
Quoting allahgore:


Just like you said you swing a big stick but when someone swings a bigger one back you either bail or get the mods to ban. funny how nymore and I got a ban the other day but not you.


No one here can get the mods to ban. We frequently have more than one mod post here, so I think it's more important to watch how you word things and try to be respectful. This forum in particular can get very edgy and at times, nasty and mean. Knowing the mods are here should add a degree of...well moderation to the discussion.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3960
Quoting martinitony:
March in Europe
December in Europe

It would seem that all those climate scientists who predicted that warming would bring about an increase in both the severity and frequency of extreme weather events pretty much hit the nail on the head, wouldn't you say?
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March in Europe
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Quoting ScottLincoln:

Or maybe I have a job and a life beyond a forum. And perhaps I don't have the time or energy to respond to each and every piece of silliness I see wrong on the internet. And another reason may be that other knowledgable people could answer your question just as easily.
Thanks, Scott. FWIW, that's much of the reason I've stopped responding to certain people here. I, like everyone else, give my time here voluntarily, so it irritates me when certain individuals post one demanding piece of nonsense after another, then have the temerity or immaturity to insult me for not answering them immediately without considering that I might be off doing other non-forum things--work, family, R&R, etc. Thus, I've found it easier to just give them some space so they can rant all to themselves, and be calm (or , you know, napping) by the time I return.
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Quoting allahgore:


can you provide an answer to post 535? seems like lincoln cherry picks what questions to answer.

Or maybe I have a job and a life beyond a forum. And perhaps I don't have the time or energy to respond to each and every piece of silliness I see wrong on the internet. And another reason may be that other knowledgable people could answer your question just as easily.

There is a difference between talking about observed rates, future rates, and a future forecast for a particular date. If scientists were to expect a linear trend, then maybe a linear trend rate would be valid. But as with most things in climate, we are not expecting things to always respond in a linear fashion. Chances are the figure we are going on and on about is in mistake. But even if it were not, people seem to have fundamental issues understanding the difference between amounts and rates. It becomes very hard for scientists to try and communicate these scientific concepts when people have a hard time grasping basic concepts, and when called out about it, do not try to learn but instead attack those knowledgeable people who could actually help them understand it better.
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Quoting JohnLonergan:
DMI Arctic Air Temperature Graph

Looks like a heatwave in the high Arctic.

People didn't honestly think that will all these surges of cold air from the Arctic, that it also just stayed cold as well, right?
This has happened before, during periods of a very negative AO when the jet stream slows and allows continuous bursts of arctic air southward into the continent, the temperature is typically warmer in areas where that colder air is usually trapped. It's been referred to as the "upside-down winter."
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Ants Rise With Temperature

Mar. 21, 2013 — Warm nights might be more important than hot days in determining how species respond to climate change. "Rising minimum temperatures may be the best way to predict how climate change will affect an ecosystem," said Robert Warren, assistant professor of biology at SUNY Buffalo State. "Cold extremes that once limited warm-adapted species will disappear in a warming global climate."

Read the whole article - have a nice weekend!
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@ Cyclone Buster
I recommend that you build a fully functional scale model, perhaps in your back yard. Make sure it generates electricity and creates the other changes that you anticipate without any unintended and potentially bad consequences.

Collect data for at least two full seasons, a year would be better. You need to account for the actions of regular weather on the device. Once you have this data, you can develop a reasonable model for extrapolation at full size and use of more than one. This will also provide more information as to actual time and costs for building.

If you do not know how to build it, I suggest you check into Maker Faires and Make magazine. You will get ideas for how to proceed. These have been around for several years and are places where people gather to have show and tell for their inventions.

I am not suggesting you try to hire someone to build the scale model. You need to take ownership of your idea and bring it forward.
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Quoting indianrivguy:
THIS, is very interesting...

Solar power cheaper than coal: One company says it%u2019s cracked the code

V3 solar animation






I wonder if the increased efficiency is sufficient to cover the energy needed to spin that entire apparatus?

EDIT: Looks like it does, or at least V3Solar claims it does: "The inner PV cone floats on magnets and uses less than 10 watts. The gains of dynamic spin far outweigh the minimal loss. Since no parts are rubbing against each other, this also minimizes the maintenance concern below."

Still, I have a deep mistrust of moving parts. lol
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Quoting Naga5000:


That I don't know. The forecast temperature increases are actually a range and the midpoint is used for the projected number. For example, here in the IPCC's 2007 report, Link you can see they state a likely range, and then use the midpoint for a best guess. I know there is a website where you can see current trends in temperature and sea level, but I can't seem to locate it right now and am a bit under the weather. I'll will try and dig that up for you tomorrow.
There are historical data and projections for temps and precipitation on the "climate" tab at the top of this page, under "local climate change".
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double post.. sorry




Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2638
THIS, is very interesting...

Solar power cheaper than coal: One company says it’s cracked the code

V3 solar animation





Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2638

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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.

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Clouds in the lee of the Rockies at sunset.
Clouds in the lee of the Rockies at sunset.
Clouds in the lee of the Rockies at sunset.
Clouds in the lee of the Rockies at sunset.