Climate, compost, and those plastic cups: Sustainability (1)

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 5:38 PM GMT on August 14, 2011

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Climate, compost, and those plastic cups: Sustainability and Climate Change (1)

This past week I was at the county fair. There were science exhibits, and a display on climate-wise gardening. There was a lot of attention to garbage; it was a zero-waste event. There was an exhibit and lecture on irrigation, with, of course, some discussion of stressed and contentious water resources. After the fair I took a one-day course on grasslands and the reclamation of prairie land. There are many places where climate and climate policy fit into this mix of small activities.

I want to start with the idea of “sustainability.” When I moved to University of Michigan in 2005, I was introduced, seriously, to the idea of sustainability. I kept asking whether or not there was an accepted, single definition of sustainability. The short answer was, “no.” If you look around you find a couple of notions that are always included in the definition of sustainability. First, there is the idea that the way that we use resources to maintain our standard of living does not preclude the ability of future generations to do the same. Second, there is the idea that all of the pieces fit together into a whole. A popular notion of sustainability is “think globally, act locally”, or conveyed by the company Seventh Generation, which strives, “To inspire a revolution that nurtures the health of the next seven generations.” On a whole different scale is Ceres, which “leads a national coalition of investors, environmental organizations and other public interest groups working with companies to address sustainability challenges such as global climate change and water scarcity.” Here are some links to definitions and discussions of sustainability: @ Washington State University, Wikipedia, Environmental Protection Agency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

It is obvious that our climate and climate change fit into the notion of sustainability, but it is not an easy relation to understand, describe and to make actionable. More directly related to our ability to sustain ourselves are population, energy, energy consumption, and standard of living. Historically we have used easy resources, because they are easy. For many centuries we were reliant upon wood for fuel and building. We cleared forests for agriculture. During the 1800s the United States was largely deforested. It became self evident that forests and whale oil were not going to support a growing population, an industrial society, and a growing economy. (A nice history of energy, and interestingly Dolly Sods Wilderness.) These sources of energy were replaced with coal and oil. All of these sources of energy have obvious, direct environmental consequences. There are also some environmental consequences that are not quite as obvious and direct; namely, those consequences due to the release of carbon dioxide.

The wealthy economies and standard of living that followed from industrialization become the priority; hence, easy energy becomes a priority. The obvious and direct environmental consequences, ultimately, become something that we try to deal with – for example, The Clean Air Act. We seek a balance of environmental pollution and industrialization – a contentious balance. Climate change is an environmental problem that is not as obvious and not as direct. It is problem where it takes, compared with a human life, a significant amount of time for the signal of climate change, of global warming, to emerge over the natural variability that we are used to dealing with. In order to mitigate climate change through the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions our “easy” choice is to quit burning fossils fuels, but that is not an easy choice to make if we humans exercise our prerogative of pursuit of high standards of living and population growth. To address climate change requires us to look out beyond the length of our lives and to see the value that a sustainable environment will have to those who follow us.

There was a couple of years ago a paper in Nature entitled, “A safe operating space for humanity”, by Johan Rockstrom and many colleagues. Here is Figure 1 from that paper.



Figure 1: “The inner green shading represents the proposed safe operating space for nine planetary systems. The red wedges represent an estimate of the current position for each variable. The boundaries in three systems (rate of biodiversity loss, climate change and human interference with the nitrogen cycle), have already been exceeded.” From “A safe operating space for humanity”, by Johan Rockstrom and many colleagues (Nature, 2009)

This figure conveys the integrated nature of sustainability on the planetary scale. An easy example to point out – climate change is, primarily, a problem of carbon dioxide emission, as is ocean acidification. Hence, from an integrated perspective, the two cannot be looked at in isolation. But looking around the circle, all of these environmental issues are related. They are all related to population, energy, consumption, standards of living and robust economies.

I started this entry, this series, with a very mundane event – being at the fair. At the fair we talked about water, and sure climate change might be important to water, but it does not seem as immediately important as the cities’ thirst for water and the purchase of agricultural water rights (Thirsty Cities, Dry Farms). This interface of climate change on this local level is real, it is contentious, and it is substantive. Yes, I have started another series, and in it I will look at “think globally, act locally.” Yet another problem of many scales that must be addressed as we adapt to global warming.

r




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453. cyclonebuster
2:09 AM GMT on August 29, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:

Interesting, and back on topic, if you realize it or not.

Perspective, from the creator!

You are a racist!

So Sad,,,,,,,,,,,,, depth of conviction and passion, not science? WTH!



No need to worry about it the Northern Arctic ice melt is the true indicator as to what is happening.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
452. Ossqss
1:43 AM GMT on August 29, 2011
Interesting, and back on topic, if you realize it or not.

Perspective, from the creator!

You are a racist!

So Sad,,,,,,,,,,,,, depth of conviction and passion, not science? WTH!



Something to pass the time >:)

August 24, 2011 4:58 pm
More Complexity Found In The Climate System
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
451. cyclonebuster
1:26 AM GMT on August 29, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:



Keep workin on it CB, it will come to you.

Now, how would your tunnels have done in 30 FT seas? Just curious how you think that would work out.

Would those 1- 2,000 Ft deep fiberglass tubes have survived across 40 miles of ocean, let alone hurricane stirred ocean ?

Perspective, is a tremendously essential tool of focus, clarity, and ultimate understanding.

Some have it, some don't. Quite simple actually :)


Just as good as much deeper oil well platforms do.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
450. Ossqss
1:23 AM GMT on August 29, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:


"EXTREMELY UNLIKELY" Comprende?


The amount of solar energy received at the top of our atmosphere has followed its natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs, but with no net increase. Over the same period, global temperature has risen markedly. This indicates that it is extremely unlikely that solar influence has been a significant driver of global temperature change over several decades.




Global surface temperature (top, blue) and the Sun's energy received at the top of Earth's atmosphere (red, bottom). Solar energy has been measured by satellites since 1978.



Keep workin on it CB, it will come to you.

Now, how would your tunnels have done in 30 FT seas? Just curious how you think that would work out.

Would those 1- 2,000 Ft deep fiberglass tubes have survived across 40 miles of ocean, let alone hurricane stirred ocean ?

Perspective, is a tremendously essential tool of focus, clarity, and ultimate understanding.

Some have it, some don't. Quite simple actually :)


Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
449. cyclonebuster
1:14 AM GMT on August 29, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:

Some have vision, others perpetuate policy as instructed. Bollards cannot stop the unstoppable :)

Remember, we still are learning how clouds are actually created, no? Do those models that want to rule our world know how that works?

Nope



"EXTREMELY UNLIKELY" Comprende?


The amount of solar energy received at the top of our atmosphere has followed its natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs, but with no net increase. Over the same period, global temperature has risen markedly. This indicates that it is extremely unlikely that solar influence has been a significant driver of global temperature change over several decades.




Global surface temperature (top, blue) and the Sun's energy received at the top of Earth's atmosphere (red, bottom). Solar energy has been measured by satellites since 1978.
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
448. Ossqss
12:59 AM GMT on August 29, 2011

Some have vision, others perpetuate policy as instructed. Bollards cannot stop the unstoppable :)

Remember, we still are learning how clouds are actually created, no? Do those models that want to rule our world know how that works?

Nope

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
447. overwash12
9:49 PM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting nymore:
I see the lunatics over at Climate Progress are blaming Irene on AGWT and these people want us to take them at their word about anything. Sounds like someone should Baker Act them. LMFAO
What caused hurricanes in the past? Global cooling?
Member Since: June 24, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1437
446. nymore
1:45 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
I see the lunatics over at Climate Progress are blaming Irene on AGWT and these people want us to take them at their word about anything. Sounds like someone should Baker Act them. LMFAO
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2210
445. cyclonebuster
1:29 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


I believe you must have had part of your frontal-lobe removed. Climate models are probably the most inaccurate computer simulations of the future available. What good would asking Dr. Rood do? Perhaps he would vacillate and equivocate on how the models have improved over the past decade, which isn't true.


So how is it you know more than the climate models Quiz Kid?
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
444. JBastardi
1:22 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:


Really! Don't ask me ask Dr. Rood!


I believe you must have had part of your frontal-lobe removed. Climate models are probably the most inaccurate computer simulations of the future available. What good would asking Dr. Rood do? Perhaps he would vacillate and equivocate on how the models have improved over the past decade, which isn't true.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
443. cyclonebuster
1:19 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
OUCH!


Arctic ice retreat reopens Northwest Passage


Prime Minister Stephen Harper wrapped up his annual tour of the North on Friday amid fresh signs the region has experienced another major meltdown this summer, including the renewed opening of the southern route of the Northwest Passage and an overall ice retreat threatening to smash 2007's record-setting thaw.

The Canadian Ice Service confirmed Friday that a southerly shipping route through Canada's Arctic islands can now be safely navigated, though shifting winds could send ice floes into a key strait near Nunavut's Victoria Island and complicate voyage through the Northwest Passage.

Meanwhile, the U.S.-based National Snow and Ice Data Centre has made public data that show total Arctic ice is once again retreating below the 5-million-square-kilometre mark, meaning the five greatest melts since satellite measurements began in the late 1970s have occurred in the past five years.

The severe retreat includes the opening of vast stretches of the Beaufort Sea north of the Yukon-Alaska border, where Canadian and U.S. scientists are engaged in a joint seabed mapping mission aimed at securing undersea territorial rights for the two countries under a UN treaty.

Arctic Ocean ice typically reaches a maximum winter extent of more than 14 million square kilometres. It melts significantly during the summer, usually reaching its minimum extent in mid-September.

The 30-year average for the end-of-summer minimum extent is about 7 million square kilometres. But since 2007, when a thaw reduced overall Arctic ice to 4.13 million square kilometres by that September, the region has continued to experience distinctly below-average ice minimums.

The severe ice retreat in the northern polar regions has many scientists concerned about the long-term effect of climate change, including altered wildlife habitats that appear to be threatening the future of ice-dependent species such as polar bear and narwhal.

Link
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
442. nymore
1:11 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Neo- For a killer income I'll go where ever they tell me to go. Which makes it possible to send the kids to the college of their choice so I think they will forgive me. I will continue to do so unless you would like to make up the difference for me to work at Mc Donalds BTW thanks for the beautiful photos of what makes modern life possible. I really like the sunset and there is such a wonder at the sight (site) of organized chaos
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2210
441. cyclonebuster
1:08 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


Oh really? I guess you put your trust in those fabulously-accurate climate models based on 30 years of data. You can't be serious.


Really! Don't ask me ask Dr. Rood!
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
440. JBastardi
1:02 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:


Once the North Arctic Ice melts out in the Summer then we will see an increase of the melting on Greenland and in Antarctica due to that ice being on land because there is no water below it to melt it faster. Comprende?


Oh really? I guess you put your trust in those fabulously-accurate climate models based on 30 years of data. You can't be serious.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
439. cyclonebuster
1:00 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


For a change, Mr. Ouch, why don't you post Antarctic ice levels? I realize that you can only focus your limited attention on a portion of the world, but Southern Hemisphere temperatures have been much below the average. Just remember, the world has a lower half also.


Once the North Arctic Ice melts out in the Summer then we will see an increase of the melting on Greenland and in Antarctica due to that ice being on land because there is no water below it to melt it faster. Comprende?
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
438. JBastardi
12:54 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
As an aside, should we really trust climate models (or their authors) when the models can't predict the path or intensity of a hurricane more than about four days out? That certainly begs the question. Logic should provide the answer. Hmmmmm.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
437. JBastardi
12:46 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:
Ouch!



For a change, Mr. Ouch, why don't you post Antarctic ice levels? I realize that you can only focus your limited attention on a portion of the world, but Southern Hemisphere temperatures have been much below the average. Just remember, the world has a lower half also.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
436. cyclonebuster
12:38 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Ouch!

Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
435. cyclonebuster
12:37 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
OUCH!


Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
434. cyclonebuster
12:33 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


Where's Antarctic ice?


In Antarctica!
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
433. JBastardi
12:30 AM GMT on August 28, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:

OUCH!



Where's Antarctic ice?
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
432. cyclonebuster
12:25 AM GMT on August 28, 2011

OUCH!

Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
431. JBastardi
10:21 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

I had to laugh at your use the term "true science" while linking to an article by anti-science propagandist Andrew Orlowski. ;-)


Anyone who doesn't support your point of view is "anti-science", I take it? The real comedy is this climate change fraud.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
430. Neapolitan
9:05 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:
Looks like present climate models are exactly what everyone knew, but warmists denied: garbage! It's fun to see that warmists have become what they accuse everyone else of being: deniers. It's amusing that AGW proponents are guilty of denial in the psychological sense as well. They are projecting their traits of denialism onto those following true science.

Link

I had to laugh at your use the term "true science" while linking to an article by anti-science propagandist Andrew Orlowski. ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
429. Neapolitan
8:50 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


That is exactly what the greenies said about the Alaskan Pipeline. I remember them screaming how it was going to decimate all of the wildlife. Now it's the only area in the winter that has any vegetation. The caribou congregate along the pipeline because it keeps them warm. You warmists are really entertaining. You never have any memory of past events when your dire predictions fail as they always do -- somewhat similar to the doomsday predictions of "global warming."

Allow me to show you the difference between the Trans-Alaska pipeline (photo #1) and the Alberta Scar Sands (#2):

Uh-oh

Uh-oh

Using the first to justify the second is like saying that since shooting a spitball at someone doesn't hurt, would a few hundred rounds from a .50 cal at point blank range oughta be just fine.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
428. Neapolitan
8:35 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


The article itself said that many would not be able to pay for fuel. No pay = no heat. What happens if you have no heat in winter? Do I have to spell it out for you?

Allow me to state the exceedingly obvious again: paying a few extra cents now is immensely cheaper than it's going to be to deal with climate change down the road. As such, it's disingenuous to pretend care and concern for the poor is behind the wish to maintain the fossil fuel paradigm, as the poor are the very ones who will suffer the quickest and the greatest as the planet warms.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
427. theshepherd
7:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
419. Ossqss

Excellent.

Amazing how some think that only they get to choose.

Member Since: September 11, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 10030
426. PurpleDrank
6:28 PM GMT on August 27, 2011



Member Since: August 17, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 730
425. JBastardi
5:46 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Looks like present climate models are exactly what everyone knew, but warmists denied: garbage! It's fun to see that warmists have become what they accuse everyone else of being: deniers. It's amusing that AGW proponents are guilty of denial in the psychological sense as well. They are projecting their traits of denialism onto those following true science.

Link
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
424. JBastardi
3:03 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

Yeah, good for you, eddy. And when your grandkids someday look at pictures of the hot, toxic, barren gravel field that Alberta's once-pristine wilderness has become, you can proudly tell them, "I did that, children! Oil company profits rose 5% because of me!"

Good for you.


That is exactly what the greenies said about the Alaskan Pipeline. I remember them screaming how it was going to decimate all of the wildlife. Now it's the only area in the winter that has any vegetation. The caribou congregate along the pipeline because it keeps them warm. You warmists are really entertaining. You never have any memory of past events when your dire predictions fail as they always do -- somewhat similar to the doomsday predictions of "global warming."
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
423. JBastardi
2:58 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

Yes, I'm averaging the increase--as the article itself did. Now, how you extrapolated that to "I suppose you want the poverty-stricken to freeze" is entirely beyond me. But then again, denialist blather often avoids any semblance of logic altogether, so kudos for sticking to the script...


The article itself said that many would not be able to pay for fuel. No pay = no heat. What happens if you have no heat in winter? Do I have to spell it out for you?
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
422. Neapolitan
2:33 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting nymore:
Neapolitan- I go work where they tell me to and I am proud to help the economy out. Thank you now I'm off to work. I guess 500 lunatics getting arrested in Washington DC is no match against 300 million americans worried about a stable supply of oil. Better luck next time and the next time. If you people don't like it build a better mouse trap LMFAO

Oh, so it's the whole, "I was only following orders" defense? Got it. At any rate, those 500 patriots getting arrested is no match, alright: no match against billions in fossil fuel dollars. The "Screw-The-Environment-Profit-Is-All-That-Matters" crowd must be very pleased this morning. :-\
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
421. Neapolitan
2:30 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:
And some blame others for their posts being invisible :)


In your obvious confusion, you may wonder why my posts are hidden, but since I know the entire story, I don't wonder at all. Not for a second. Here's a hint: it's because of a deliberate and concentrated attack by denialist trolls doing what they do best. That is, censoring and obfuscating the truth.

Believe me or don't believe me; the choice is yours. But proof is coming shortly. And that's a promise.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
420. nymore
1:26 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Neapolitan- I go work where they tell me to and I am proud to help the economy out. Thank you now I'm off to work. I guess 500 lunatics getting arrested in Washington DC is no match against 300 million americans worried about a stable supply of oil. Better luck next time and the next time. If you people don't like it build a better mouse trap LMFAO
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2210
419. Ossqss
12:31 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
And some blame others for their posts being invisible :)

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
418. Neapolitan
12:21 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting nymore:
The Keystone pipeline is going through I am working here right now helping them expand production. It is just political games being played BTW this won't be the last pipe put in.

Yeah, good for you, eddy. And when your grandkids someday look at pictures of the hot, toxic, barren gravel field that Alberta's once-pristine wilderness has become, you can proudly tell them, "I did that, children! Oil company profits rose 5% because of me!"

Good for you.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
417. Neapolitan
12:17 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting theshepherd:


So lets see...This project will help lower dependency on foriegn oil and create domestic jobs at the same time???

Hmmm...






Well, first, for Americans, it is foreign oil.

But aside from that, and far more insidious, is that the ignorant rallying cry for all types of corporate greed run amok is yet again "job creation!". And that's used far too much as an excuse for pretty much anything--tax cuts to the wealthiest, bank bailouts, corporate malfeasance, and so on--which might be okay if, you know, it were actually true.

Treasonous acts are being committed. There will be a price to pay, and the entire planet will be paying it.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
416. Neapolitan
12:09 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:
August 26, 2011 6:45 pm
Keystone pipeline project clears hurdle



"In its final report, the department concluded that, provided the pipeline complied with its required standards for construction and maintenance, there would be “no significant impacts to most resources” along the route."



I'm sure that same wording was in the Deepwater Horizon's drilling permit.

At any rate, those with the deepest pockets--in this as in so many others cases, Big Energy--are the ones whose voices are heard. I'm still a little unsure why so many are so ready and willing to surrender their planet's future to corporate greed; whether it's ignorance, blindness, or stupidity, I just don't know. Maybe it's all three...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
415. Neapolitan
12:04 PM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


If the people could afford it. You're averaging the increase. I suppose you want the poverty-stricken to freeze.

Yes, I'm averaging the increase--as the article itself did. Now, how you extrapolated that to "I suppose you want the poverty-stricken to freeze" is entirely beyond me. But then again, denialist blather often avoids any semblance of logic altogether, so kudos for sticking to the script...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
414. theshepherd
10:39 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
412. nymore

Good for you bro.

Instead of worrying about even having a job this winter, maybe yourself and many like you can have a blessed Christmas.

And may all of the brats that wish to get arrested impeeding the progress of the project receive "Community Service" and be assigned the task of picking up trash on the highway so that you and others like you can better enjoy your ride to work...that would be "Justice".
Member Since: September 11, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 10030
413. theshepherd
10:28 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Ossqss:
August 26, 2011 6:45 pm
Keystone pipeline project clears hurdle



"In its final report, the department concluded that, provided the pipeline complied with its required standards for construction and maintenance, there would be “no significant impacts to most resources” along the route."




So lets see...This project will help lower dependency on foriegn oil and create domestic jobs at the same time???

Hmmm...





Member Since: September 11, 2008 Posts: 9 Comments: 10030
412. nymore
3:35 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
The Keystone pipeline is going through I am working here right now helping them expand production. It is just political games being played BTW this won't be the last pipe put in.
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2210
411. cyclonebuster
2:22 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


Where's the Southern Sea Ice measurement?


That will be later once the Northern Ice is gone in the summer!
Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
410. Ossqss
2:18 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:


If the people could afford it. You're averaging the increase. I suppose you want the poverty-stricken to freeze.


Not intentionally, but that is what it amounts to.

That is simply the way some think.

I call them bollards.

Once installed, they never move until removed.

Designed to protect, but have no ability to change.

It is time for a change!

Real and tangible change, and it is happening as I type..... L8R>>



Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
409. Ossqss
2:06 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
August 26, 2011 6:45 pm
Keystone pipeline project clears hurdle



"In its final report, the department concluded that, provided the pipeline complied with its required standards for construction and maintenance, there would be “no significant impacts to most resources” along the route."


Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
408. JBastardi
2:03 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting cyclonebuster:
OUCH!



Where's the Southern Sea Ice measurement?
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
407. JBastardi
1:50 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

Even if true, $0.46 a day is far less than it'll cost to take care of things if the EPA doesn't get its way.


If the people could afford it. You're averaging the increase. I suppose you want the poverty-stricken to freeze.
Member Since: July 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 403
406. cyclonebuster
11:02 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
OUCH!

Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
405. cyclonebuster
10:01 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
OUCH!



British explorers row 450 miles to North Pole in world first voyage
A group of intrepid British explorers yesterday became the first people to row to the magnetic North Pole after the ice caps melted in a journey that encountered polar bears, collisions with icebergs and biting seals.
Jock Wishart, an adventurer who has rowed his way across the Atlantic and circumnavigated the globe in a powerboat, said he and his five-man team were "exhilarated" after completing their 450-mile voyage through the Arctic waters.

The group, who embarked on their expedition to highlight the effects of climate change on the region, encountered polar bears and collided with icebergs in their specially designed vessel.

The group saw around eight polar bears on their journey, one of which came within five feet of them while Mr Wishart even had a seal attack him on his bottom as a reminder he was "still human”.

The successful trip to the Pole, described as the “greatest ocean rows of all time”, was only possible because of more seasonal ice-melt in the Arctic that has opened the waters up.

It was later pointed out by observers that the group had in fact reached the 1996 location of the pole. Throughout the journey, the crew, one of whom became a father a few days ago, compiled scientific research to help provide fresh environmental data on the impact of arctic deterioration on the polar landscape.

Mr Wishart, who led the Old Pulteney Row To The Pole, described the journey, which took less than a month to complete, as “incredible”.

"I think this is one of my greatest achievements. It was a dream four years ago but now it's reality,” the exhausted explorer said yesterday.

"Up until last night we still could not say with certainty that we would reach our destination, so we are all exhilarated and relieved that weather conditions were in our favour.

"It is an enormous achievement, and a privilege for our team to have been part of what is one of the world's last great firsts."

Speaking by satellite phone the Dumfries-born adventurer and motivational speaker added: “It will go down in history books as the first ever (time) someone has rowed to the North Pole.

“It was a real true global first and probably one of the greatest ocean rows of all time. Everything had gone very much like clockwork.”

He told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that a seal, called King Neptune, had bitten him on his bottom "to remind us what we are all human".

Another member of crew Mark Delstanche, 35, from London, had another reason to celebrate as he became a father to a baby son a few days ago.

The other rowers in the crew were Billy Gammon, 37, from Cornwall; Rob Sleep, 38, and British Army officer Captain David Mans, 28, both from Hampshire.

Mr Wishart has had a lifelong interest in polar exploration and in 1992 was part of the first team to walk unsupported to the geomagnetic north pole.

The father-of-two captained the team that broke the London to Paris rowing record in 1999 and walked unsupported to the North Pole in 1992.

Cyclist Mark Beaumont, 28, from Fife, was also on board making a BBC documentary about the voyage.

The group set out from Resolute Bay in Canada on July 29 in their specially designed boat-cum-sledge the Old Pulteney, which has runners on its underside so that it can be hauled over the ice.

They slept in shifts between rowing stints and were fuelled by 7,000 calorie per day dry rations. Another challenge was floating ice which blocked their route, particularly towards the end of their journey as the ice closed in.

Mr Wishart, who is in his late 50s described how pulling over ice and rubble in the last miles of the journey was a “hard reminder that we are mere mortal”.

He said the local terrain looked similar to that of a “giant car scrap heap” but that was completely white.

"We've been very lucky with the weather but there's been times when we've been trying to find our way through moving ice floes in fog and we're a long, long way from help,” he said.

"Now I'm looking forward to a nice pint and a glass of malt whisky when I get home."

Mr Beaumont's documentary, titled Rowing The Arctic, will be shown as part of BBC Scotland's Explorers Season this winter.



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Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
404. cyclonebuster
8:27 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
OUCH!


Tied for 1st place!



Member Since: January 2, 2006 Posts: 127 Comments: 20221
403. Neapolitan
7:02 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting JBastardi:
Watch out! This could happen here if the EPA gets its way:

Link

Even if true, $0.46 a day is far less than it'll cost to take care of things if the EPA doesn't get its way.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306

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About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.