Is this year what we can expect?

By: Dr. Ricky Rood , 6:38 PM GMT on August 03, 2011

Share this Blog
11
+

Is this year what we can expect?

In recent weeks a question I have been asked often, “is this year, the last couple of years, like what we can expect in the future?” The question is often asked quietly, perhaps by a planner, say, someone worried about water in their city. The question follows from not only a perception that the weather is getting “weird,”, but also some small aspect of experience in their job. For example, a water manager recently said they were seeing their local river showing a distinct change to sporadically high flow in the winter, smaller spring flows, and extremely small flow late in the summer. Is this what I should expect in the future? The short answer is yes.

This question of expectation has rolled around in my head for years. I am a gardener with aspirations for small farmer. Over the last 30 years, I have definitely pushed my planting earlier in the year. When I was in Maryland, I felt wet, cool Mays were becoming the “norm,” with my tomatoes sitting in sodden soil. At the same time I would recall plots I had seen in some recent presentation that showed modeled shifts in the warm-cold patterns suggesting springtime cooling in northeastern North America. These are the sorts of casual correlations that lead people to think are we seeing a new “normal.”

In 2008 I wrote a blog about the changes in the hardiness zones that are reported on the back of seed packages. These are the maps that tell us the last frost date, and there were big changes between 1990 and 2006. These changes in the seed packets caught the attention of a lot of people. Recently, NOAA published the “new normal.” This normal relies on the definition of climate as a 30 year average. (AMS Glossary) What was done - at the completion of the decade NOAA recalculated a 30 year average. That is, 1981-2010 rather than 1971-2000. This average changed a lot, with notable warming of nighttime minima. There was some regional reduction of summertime maxima; that is, cooling. All in all, the average temperature went up, with most of the increase in nighttime minimum, a fact that is consistent with both model simulations and fundamental physics. This also came with another update of those hardiness zones.

When trying to interpret climate information and determining how has climate changed and how will it change, the combination of observations, fundamental physics, and models provide three sources of information. The combination of this information and the determination of the quality of that information is subject to interpretation. In the case of determining whether or not we are already experiencing the climate of warming world and how that change will be realized in the next decades it depends on how we use the models.

In my previous entry on heat waves, I implied how to use these pieces of information together. There are fundamental physics in the relationship between temperature and moisture in the air; hot air holds more water; warm water evaporates more quickly. The question of the model is - how well does the model represent the movement of that moisture? For the heat wave example, it is important how well do the models represent persistent high pressure systems over North America in the summer? Are these high pressure systems represented well by the models for the right reasons? The answer to the model question has a range of answers. The model does represent these systems, but if you are an expert in summertime persistent high pressure systems, then you can provide a long list of inadequacies. How can we glean information about the quality of the model? If we look at weather models, then we were able to predict the heat wave – even with the inadequacies that the expert or skeptic can list. Returning to the climate model, do we see like events in the current climate, and do these events change as the planet warms? The answer is yes. Then can we use this to guide our development of plans to adapt to climate change? The answer is yes, if we can connect the model back to data and the fundamental physics. This does become a matter of interpretation – how strong or weak is that connection?

The more I work with planners the more I hear the need for interpretive information, expert guidance, advisories about climate and climate change. People start with the notion that they want digital data from climate models that looks like current weather data. Once presented with 1) the logistical challenges of using that data, 2) the complex nature of the uncertainties associated with that data, and 3) the relative importance of climate to other parts of their decision package – once presented with these facts, they move to the need for advice. This makes sense - most of us want a narrative weather forecast, rather than model output. And the models play the same role in the use of weather forecasts as they do in climate projection. The models guide our thinking, with the ultimate forecast based on that guidance refined by observations and fundamental physics.

This entry started with the question I hear more and more – is this year what we can expect more of in the future? I have a mantra which is that on average the surface of the Earth will warm, ice will melt, sea level will rise, and the weather will change. What we are seeing here is weather changing in a warming, more energy laden, environment. The extraordinary extremes that we have seen in the last year and are seeing this year are quite solidly connected to both fundamental physics and the guidance from climate and weather models. Hence, my answer, as I walk around my garden, thinking how to get better tomatoes next year, thinking about my irrigation system in my doddering retirement, is yes, what we are seeing this year tells me about what to expect in a future that is relevant to me - not something far off.

r

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 221 - 171

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29Blog Index

Cyclonebuster : After the letter that you posted from Hugh Willoughby and looking at the schematic and the video you have my 100% interest. I kicked around a similar idea that I thought would also work, byut after careful thinking about installing fans/propeller's on the floor of the gulf stream to drive up cooler water. I see now that your tunnels will work much more effectively. Im hoping that everyone will get on board with us here and see that the end result will very effectively work in several benefits. Good luck and keep me posted on your progress.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
So what plan is there to get Northern Arctic Ice back to preindustrial revolution extent?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nymore:
I would like to say to you all it has been fun exchanging points with everyone. My crane has arrived in Fort McMurray Alberta so it is off to work for awhile. Hopefully I will see you all in a couple of months. I also have to say I am sorry for the job as my Demag CC6800 crawler ( which is fairly big )will be picking material to increase production of the oil sands. All you AGWT folks can blame me now for actually helping contribute to Global Warming but hey it pays the bills. ROFL PEACE OUT signed The EdgeHells bells, get busy so we don't pay another nickel to Chavez.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Not new, but still interesting. This fellow certainly brings a perspective, no?

Where is he anyhow, sarcasm flag up :)



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I would like to say to you all it has been fun exchanging points with everyone. My crane has arrived in Fort McMurray Alberta so it is off to work for awhile. Hopefully I will see you all in a couple of months. I also have to say I am sorry for the job as my Demag CC6800 crawler ( which is fairly big )will be picking material to increase production of the oil sands. All you AGWT folks can blame me now for actually helping contribute to Global Warming but hey it pays the bills. ROFL PEACE OUT signed The Edge
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
LoL


Eye's betcha I know's where ya gotz yer shoes ,,



Ok, Senor ignorant. They be on my feet.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ossqss:


"Ever"

That's a really long time!

Is this part of that class on how to better comunicate weather events from last year?

Gheeze ! ®

Oh, we don't even need to talk about weather events from last year if doing so makes you uncomfortable; there's been enough crazy stuff this year alone to show anyone watching that things are changing very, very quickly...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
No way dats gonna happen fer sho iceageacoming..

,,Choot'um, choot'um liz!! : )
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Who dat, Pat.
Don't change the Cajun.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:


Oh, I'd agree. If that's all it was. But countless all-time highs embedded in the worst US heat wave ever inside what will likely be the most prolonged US drought ever is definitely something worth mentioning.

Looks like weather denialism to me.


"Ever"

That's a really long time!

Is this part of that class on how to better comunicate weather events from last year?

Gheeze ! ®
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JupiterKen:
"but those who know more"

It's statements like this that make you a pompous ass. I think I'll have another glass of wine. ;-) <--- This makes it OK

More name calling, huh? I sense your frustration, but I still find it inappropriate.

Anyway, you'll note that I didn't include myself in the group of "those who know more", so if you have done so, you've done so on your own, and I want you to know that I appreciate the flattery. But I was talking about climate scientists. You know, those people who have spent years being educated about climate, and many additional years doing research and observation. Those are the people we should be listening to about climate, not Big Energy puppets, or talk radio hosts, or politicians beholden to fossil fuel interests, or simply uneducated laypeople who refuse to heed the science because the thought of the impending change is just to uncomfortable to swallow.

Anyway, please try to refrain from such name-calling in the future. Thanks!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
LoL


Eye's betcha I know's where ya gotz yer shoes ,,

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
#201

Your kinda touchy feely a tad seems (faux) JB.

Understandable,

Meez kinda like's the ol' Quarter dialect of da French and Irish.


..and you Sir, are no JB.


Ciao! for now.





Don't know about you, but I was born in the Quarter. Don't tell me about what's spoken there. I was raised on Exchange Alley. My father was born on Kerlerec St. in 1927. I'm not touchy. It just makes me cringe when I read your ridiculous posts written in some made-up dialect that ignore all semblance of science. You ignore what dooms your propaganda and post the same biased graphs day after day. Wake up and smell the cooling.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
So what plan is there to get Northern Arctic Ice back to preindustrial revolution extent?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
"but those who know more"

It's statements like this that make you a pompous ass. I think I'll have another glass of wine. ;-) <--- This makes it OK
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JBastardi:


Hi temps in two states are barely worth mentioning.


Oh, I'd agree. If that's all it was. But countless all-time highs embedded in the worst US heat wave ever inside what will likely be the most prolonged US drought ever is definitely something worth mentioning.

Looks like weather denialism to me.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:

That's pretty incredible, then: at least 27 all-time national highs--and probably more--since the last all-time national low was set. Some may dismiss that as "just weather", but those who know more would call that "meaningful".
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
#201

Your kinda touchy feely a tad seems (faux) JB.

Understandable,

Meez kinda like's the ol' Quarter dialect of da French and Irish.


..and you Sir, are no JB.


Ciao! for now.



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting robodave:
Hundreds of years ago it looked like the stars and the sun were revolving around earth. Studious star gazers could see this much. That's why they thought the earth was the center of all things. It's understandable when looked at from that perspective (see the humor?). It wasn't religion driven until the faithful interpreted that as confirming their special place in the cosmic order of things.


Perhaps a little further reading is in order?

Link

Link

Link

Link

You will discover that it was not the people that were telling the Church but, rather, it was the Church telling the people about Heaven, Hell and Earth and how these were all arranged in the universe. One must remember that only the clergy had Bibles centuries ago. The "flock" depended on the clergy to tell them what was in the Bible. The invention of the printing press finally made it possible for the masses to have access to the Bible. The printing press was not invented until around 1440 A.D. - Link - While the invention of the printing press greatly reduced the labor of hand scribing, it was not until the invention of the modern printing presses before books could be massed produced. Everyone that now wants their own copy of the Bible can now do so. This has only been true for fairly modern history and not so true for the centuries before that. Until then, it was the Church that told the "flock" what the Bible contained. This was not the other way around, as you seem to state. Several observers of their day faced heresy charges brought against them by the Church. Two such "observers" was Leonardo Da Vinci and Galileo.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weatherhistorian:


P.S. You can add one more to last year's list of new national highs: Jordan. A reading of 51.1°C (124.0°F) was reliably measured at Dier Alla Agro Station on August 20, 2010. This record was just recently uncovered by Max Herrera.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cyclonebuster:
So what plan is there to get Northern Arctic Ice back to preindustrial revolution extent?


How do we know what that extent was? We've only been keeping ice records for 30 yrs.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
So what plan is there to get Northern Arctic Ice back to preindustrial revolution extent?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:


Well, the summer is far from over, of course. But, yeah, the killer 2011 will have beaten 1980 in most every respect.

--Wichita Falls--which is in North Texas--reached 100 today for the 73rd time this year. The record there for most in a year is 79, so barring a sudden and profound pattern change, that record will be obliterated.

--Amarillo--also in North Texas--averages six 100 or hotter days each year. The record was 26. This year--counting today--there have been 37.

--Ft. Smith, Arkansas--not so far from North Texas--reached its previous all-time high of 113 on the 2nd and the 5th. It reached 115 on the 3rd.

--In Dallas, the first five days of this month reached record highs.

--San Angelo, Texas, has reached 100 or higher 72 times this years, a record.

--And on, and on, and on.

So far as sea level rise, I'm not sure where you live. In most places in the globe, however, it's risen fairly steadily over the past several decades.


Looks like weather to me. Hi temps in two states are barely worth mentioning.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting overwash12:
Link Did we beat 1980? As far as sealevel rise,I live on an Island in a brackish water sound. The sea level has not risen here,maybe we have a different type of force holding the water back,I don't know.


Well, the summer is far from over, of course. But, yeah, the killer 2011 will have beaten 1980 in most every respect.

--Wichita Falls--which is in North Texas--reached 100 today for the 73rd time this year. The record there for most in a year is 79, so barring a sudden and profound pattern change, that record will be obliterated.

--Amarillo--also in North Texas--averages six 100 or hotter days each year. The record was 26. This year--counting today--there have been 37.

--Ft. Smith, Arkansas--not so far from North Texas--reached its previous all-time high of 113 on the 2nd and the 5th. It reached 115 on the 3rd.

--In Dallas, the first five days of this month reached record highs.

--San Angelo, Texas, has reached 100 or higher 72 times this years, a record.

--And on, and on, and on.

So far as sea level rise, I'm not sure where you live. In most places in the globe, however, it's risen fairly steadily over the past several decades.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Link Did we beat 1980? As far as sealevel rise,I live on an Island in a brackish water sound. The sea level has not risen here,maybe we have a different type of force holding the water back,I don't know.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting robodave:
Hundreds of years ago it looked like the stars and the sun were revolving around earth. Studious star gazers could see this much. That's why they thought the earth was the center of all things. It's understandable when looked at from that perspective (see the humor?). It wasn't religion driven until the faithful interpreted that as confirming their special place in the cosmic order of things.

IN any case, what's going on today is not all that different. Everything appears to be warming and since humans are the dominating force and research is always nitpicking at them because of that then it's only a natural - but not forgivable - conclusion that humans are to blame for this. It's all relative, right? Humans are like a light at night that attracts all your attention away from the shadows. We're naturally drawn to see things this way. I suspect that the new age folks (the faithful) will take this as meaning that they were right all along about the evil humans and now look forward to reducing industry to zero so that society can be reinvented into a green utopia - much like the church wanted to make society into a religious state. It all worked out until people got smart and the science no longer made us the center of all things. Anyway, not much has changed in the thousands of years we've been here. It's remarkable.

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes." I love that quote. Mark Twain? John Colombo?

Does it matter? Is an appropriate quote.

It appears to me that your conclusion assumes the nonexistence of empirical science. The thing is, neither the observed climatic changes nor the primary theory used to explain those changes are based on anything so subjective as human egocentricism; they are, rather, based entirely on thoroughly verified and validated observation and experimentation performed by numerous independent lines of research.

I do find it amusing how you've turned the true story on its head. In reality, it was the establishment of the day that denied the increasingly overwhelming science showing that earth was not after all the center of the Universe. And it was science that was then, and forever should be, that "light at night" of which you spoke.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting overwash12:
Apparently we have a summer that rivals 1980,for Texas residents it is brutal! So,31 years later and this is all attributed to AGW! What about natural cycles,sunspots,volcanoes? They play no part whatsoever? Still waiting for that supposed sealevel rise,Ain't happening.

The current heat wave, of course, began earlier in the year than the 1980 heat wave, it's lasted longer than the 1980 heat wave, and it's broken many records set during the 1980 heat wave (and it's likely weeks away from waning).

As to your other points, this is well-traveled territory: sea levels have risen, and demonstrably so; the planet has continued to warm even as the sun has been at historically low levels; volcanoes add but a fraction of a percent of GHGs that our burning of fossil fuel does. And so on, and so forth.

At any rate, nobody ever said natural cycles didn't play a part, so I'm not sure where that came from...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting atmoaggie:
Eh, maybe I should have put a "maybe" in there as I didn't see the posts. I do see name-calling in many, though, hence my suggestion.

Such as this one, above. Just trying to be helpful.

Yes, we have talked about this before, and, as I've stated previously, referring to someone as a "denialist" is not "name-calling"; it's merely the common sense application of a well-understood, frequently-used shorthand label. (I use "skeptic" where warranted, but I've yet to run into one of those on this site.)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JBastardi:
It appears that severe weather isn't a new phenomenon. Looks like it's been happening throughout all recorded history, even before the dreaded C02 could have had any effect:

Link
The Earth can be an unforgiving place to be without the proper shelter and clothing needed to survive.Thank God for a.c. and heat in the winter!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It appears that severe weather isn't a new phenomenon. Looks like it's been happening throughout all recorded history, even before the dreaded C02 could have had any effect:

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Apparently we have a summer that rivals 1980,for Texas residents it is brutal! So,31 years later and this is all attributed to AGW! What about natural cycles,sunspots,volcanoes? They play no part whatsoever? Still waiting for that supposed sealevel rise,Ain't happening.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting robodave:
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes." I love that quote. Mark Twain?
Yes, Twain: "History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:

There was no name calling (though if you have a single shred of evidence that there was I'd like to see it). No, just pure science with the deserved amount of ridicule. But even if that were the case, there are numerous posts from numerous denialists containing numerous instances of "name-calling", and yet those comments are still here. As such, your theory on this matter doesn't hold water, I'm afraid. [snip, irrelevant]
Eh, maybe I should have put a "maybe" in there as I didn't see the posts. I do see name-calling in many, though, hence my suggestion.

Such as this one, above. Just trying to be helpful.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hundreds of years ago it looked like the stars and the sun were revolving around earth. Studious star gazers could see this much. That's why they thought the earth was the center of all things. It's understandable when looked at from that perspective (see the humor?). It wasn't religion driven until the faithful interpreted that as confirming their special place in the cosmic order of things.

IN any case, what's going on today is not all that different. Everything appears to be warming and since humans are the dominating force and research is always nitpicking at them because of that then it's only a natural - but not forgivable - conclusion that humans are to blame for this. It's all relative, right? Humans are like a light at night that attracts all your attention away from the shadows. We're naturally drawn to see things this way. I suspect that the new age folks (the faithful) will take this as meaning that they were right all along about the evil humans and now look forward to reducing industry to zero so that society can be reinvented into a green utopia - much like the church wanted to make society into a religious state. It all worked out until people got smart and the science no longer made us the center of all things. Anyway, not much has changed in the thousands of years we've been here. It's remarkable.

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes." I love that quote. Mark Twain? John Colombo?

Does it matter? Is an appropriate quote.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Last year, 19 nations set new all-time heat records:

Ascension Islands
Solomon Islands
Finland
Belarus
Ukraine
Colombia
Zambia
Russia
Cyprus
Bolivia
Myanmar
Chad
Niger
Sudan
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Iraq
Kuwait
Pakistan

...and so far this year, 7 nations have set new all-time heat records so far as I know:

Democratic Republic of Congo
Armenia
Russia (again)
China
Iraq (again)
Kuwait (again)
Iran

By way of comparison, here is a list of the nations that so far as I know have set new all-time cold records in 2010 or 2011:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting rod2635:


Interesting tool. Last 5 Junes have a preponderance of red. Will have to check out some of the other months. Thanks


Your welcome.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:
And it's only going to get worse:

Met blames current drought on climate change

The Kenya Meteorological Department says the current drought in North- Eastern Province is the worst ever.

The department compared the prevailing situation in the country to severe droughts experienced in 1983/1984 and 1999/2000.

The Director of Meteorological Services, Dr Joseph Mukabana in a statement, associated the drought to the continuing Climate Change.

He said global warming whose projections indicate the occurrence of more frequent and extreme climate events are manifesting a recurrence of drought conditions over much shorter durations and also prolonged episodes of rainfall deficiencies.

Mukabana says the last decade since 1998 rainfall amounts have been reducing over most parts of the Arid and Semi Arid Lands - ASALs.

"The "Long Rains" Season has also been reducing since 1998 to date," says Mukabana in the statement.

He added "this is a serious scenario, given that in most of these dryland areas, particularly those located in the Northeast and Northern part of the country, the "Long Rains" Season provides more abundant rainfall than the "Short Rains" Season,".

Mukabana says population increase in some of the dryland and marginal areas, including the rapid influx of refugees, has, indeed, resulted in more people being affected and requiring emergency assistance than ever before.

"It is noted that the stress generated by extreme climatic events can stretch a country's resources beyond its capacity to cope, like the current case, and external assistance, therefore, becomes a necessity," he adds.

As a long term solution, Mukabana says there is need to have a strategy for rainwater harvesting, in pans or dams, to last for, at least, a season and adoption of appropriate irrigation methods to enhance food security in the ASALs.

He adds that planting of grass for pasture, through scattering of seeds during periods of good rains, and curling of livestock before an impending drought are some of the adaptation measures that could be adopted to cope with climatic extremes in the drylands.

He noted that a drought or flood can impede and erode the economic growth and development of a country by 15 - 20% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

KBC Article...


I guess that basic concepts of 'storage' for water, etc, ie dams, that we take for granted, are not present in the local culture, making them enormously vulnerable year to year. Wonder if the topography, average rainfall, soil productivity, etc would make such a capital investment, along with other agricultural practices suggested, a practical venture?

By the way, your increasing gray shading makes your post hard to read towards the bottom, though in quote mode that disappears.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
177. iceagecoming

Not sure what this has to do with Climate Change, but seeing as how you brought it up; there is niether a ADA detectable "Vision Impaired Mat" at the entrance/exit, nor can I comprehend how the National Fire Code has not been violated in light of the glaring absence of a "No Parking/Fire Lane" zone at the entrance to a building containing a high volume of combustibles.

Had this been a "private" business I'm certain the front of this building would have a different character.

And just the idea of a "State Liquor Store" boggles my buccolic little brain.

thanx :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
And it's only going to get worse:
Met blames current drought on climate change

The Kenya Meteorological Department says the current drought in North- Eastern Province is the worst ever.

The department compared the prevailing situation in the country to severe droughts experienced in 1983/1984 and 1999/2000.

The Director of Meteorological Services, Dr Joseph Mukabana in a statement, associated the drought to the continuing Climate Change.

He said global warming whose projections indicate the occurrence of more frequent and extreme climate events are manifesting a recurrence of drought conditions over much shorter durations and also prolonged episodes of rainfall deficiencies.

Mukabana says the last decade since 1998 rainfall amounts have been reducing over most parts of the Arid and Semi Arid Lands - ASALs.

"The "Long Rains" Season has also been reducing since 1998 to date," says Mukabana in the statement.

He added "this is a serious scenario, given that in most of these dryland areas, particularly those located in the Northeast and Northern part of the country, the "Long Rains" Season provides more abundant rainfall than the "Short Rains" Season,".

Mukabana says population increase in some of the dryland and marginal areas, including the rapid influx of refugees, has, indeed, resulted in more people being affected and requiring emergency assistance than ever before.

"It is noted that the stress generated by extreme climatic events can stretch a country's resources beyond its capacity to cope, like the current case, and external assistance, therefore, becomes a necessity," he adds.

As a long term solution, Mukabana says there is need to have a strategy for rainwater harvesting, in pans or dams, to last for, at least, a season and adoption of appropriate irrigation methods to enhance food security in the ASALs.

He adds that planting of grass for pasture, through scattering of seeds during periods of good rains, and curling of livestock before an impending drought are some of the adaptation measures that could be adopted to cope with climatic extremes in the drylands.

He noted that a drought or flood can impede and erode the economic growth and development of a country by 15 - 20% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

KBC Article...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Argentine deaths from polar cold wave rises to 9


BUENOS AIRES – The wave of cold air from the Antarctic affecting practically all of Argentina with heavy snowfall and below-freezing temperatures has left nine people dead, Red Solidaria, a non-governmental organization that works to ward off such fatalities, said on Saturday.

Social director Juan Carr, founder of Red Solidaria, said that nine people have died from hypothermia.

The latest fatality was a baby living with its family on the streets of Buenos Aires, a tragedy confirmed Saturday by authorities in the Argentine capital.

Besides these nine people who died as a direct result of the freezing temperatures, 33 people – 11 of them minors – have died so far this year from carbon monoxide poisoning due to faulty combustion in heating systems.

These deaths have occurred primarily in poor homes without adequate ventilation.

According to Carr, every year in Argentina between 80 and 100 people die from hypothermia or from breathing in carbon monoxide.

“In Buenos Aires some 1,400 people sleep on the streets and in all Argentina the people in that situation add up to about 20,000, with 60 percent of them men between 35 and 55 years of age,” the founder of Red Solidaria said.

Carr stressed the participation of young people – close to 500 – who for the last 47 nights have been going into the streets of Buenos Aires and its teeming outskirts, as well as in the cities of Mendoza, Cordoba and Bariloche, to find people living on the streets in order help them avoid hypothermia.

For the last three days freezing temperatures have affected the entire country, even bringing heavy snow to areas that rarely get any.

According to the latest Meteorological Service report, “the wave of cold air from the polar region continues to affect all Argentine territory with intense frost and temperatures as low as -14 C (7 F) in central Patagonia and the nation’s central region, and between 0 C (32 F) and -3 C (27 F) in northern Argentina.”

Meanwhile in central-western and northwestern provinces such as Mendoza, San Juan, Catamarca, La Rioja, Salta and Jujuy, “precipitation in the form of sleet and snow is being recorded,” the report said.

According to the Meteorological Service, the wave of cold air is forecast to continue at least until Sunday in the southern region of Patagonia, while in the rest of the country it will begin to dissipate gradually beginning Monday.

In the midst of the cold wave, consumer associations have reported problems with the supply of natural gas and a scarcity of gas cylinders, which, if they are found at all, are being sold at far higher prices than their official value.

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is what happens when Liberals run government.

Hybrids trump handicapped at liquor store
By KIMBERLY HOUGHTON
Union Leader Correspondent
Published Aug 6, 2011 at 3:00 am (Updated Aug 5, 2011)


NASHUA — Three reserved parking spaces for hybrid and low-emission cars at the new $3.3 million state liquor store are located closer to the store’s main entrance than the handicapped parking spots, causing at least one lawmaker to call the design a slap in the face to the disabled.

“To choose to display such blatant priority for special interests over seniors, wounded veterans and others who have mobility difficulty is deplorable,” said state Rep. Peter Silva of Nashua. “The (liquor) commission owes the public an explanation as well as a plan to remedy this situation immediately.”

Nancy Farrell of Nashua Center for the Multiply Handicapped Inc., an organization that serves people with disabilities, said she was shocked upon learning that handicapped drivers were not being given priority parking spaces at the store, located on Coliseum Avenue.

“I can’t believe they did that. It is ridiculous,” said Farrell. “These people want to be as close as they can get to where they are going, for obvious mobility reasons.”

Farrell suggested that perhaps a protest be organized to have the hybrid signs moved farther away from the entrance so that handicapped motorists can park closest to the door.

On Friday, House Speaker William O’Brien sent a letter to the New Hampshire Liquor Commission questioning why it favors hybrid cars over drivers with physical disabilities.

“It appears to favor publicity over reality and concern for special interests over concern for the disabled,” O’Brien wrote in his letter addressed to Joseph Mollica, chairman of the liquor commission.

Mollica said the placement of the parking slots was intentional. He explained that the spots for LEV and hybrid vehicles are close to the store to assist with the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification requirements, a federal designation of energy efficiency and environmental design.




Link


A type of irrationality prevalent during this administrations reign, fortunately in this case it
will be a simple remedy of replacing signs once the
AARP sues the government(s) agency(ies) who enable this type illogical response to harmful directives.

2012 is going to be hard times for Dems.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
To zero in on one part of your blog, the garden - here on the East Coast we had a wet, early spring that has turned into a very dry summer. The tomatoes and peppers did fine but the lack of rain (watering did no good)was not good on the corn and then the damn stink bugs came out and wiped out what was left. I think we have more to fear from global commerce that transports pests around the planet to places where they have no natural enemies.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Post #172

Particularly toasty heat index values from yesterday:

Mobile, Alabama: 120F
Arkadelphia, Arkansas: 121F
Bay St. Louis, Mississippi: 121F
Memphis, Tennessee: 122F

Memphis, Tennessee: 122F



You warmists are fond of pointing out that extreme weather in a small region is no reflection on climate, unless, of course, it's hot weather. All of you conveniently ignore the freezing weather in the Southern Hemisphere that is killing people. You, in particular, why don't you ever post that? Hmmm


..why just to drive you insane of course JB.



PS..Dats from The Main Blog current entry.

Dr. Jeff Masters' WunderBlog
Remnants of Emily could redevelop; Muifa batters Okinawa; Central U.S. roasts



U Know,,a REAL Phd kinda guy.

..ya really gotta get out and read mo Joe.

: )
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nymore:
Can I get a mea culpa this time. Just had to quote to make sure it was not changed. I will check back later


Overwhelming scientific truth? Good lord, Neapolitan is a legend in his own mind. The real truth is that more and more government scientists are trying to save themselves before their reputations go down in flames. I predict the latest defections from the globaloney camp are only the beginning.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nymore:
Neapolitan- I hate to do this to you again but your 220,000 sq. mi. was false and the bad news is so is your latest statement. Here are the actual facts July 30th there was 6,595,000 sq. km. of ice on August 5th there was 6,312,500 sq. km. of ice or a difference of 282,500 sq km. or 109,073 sq. mi. Since ice loss was 109,073 sq. mi. and the size of Arizona is 113,998 sq. mi. that fact to would be wrong on the plus side for you it is larger than say Colorado. More overwhelming scientific truth by you proven dishonest.

Sigh

I said "in the past week alone", and a week, as you may be aware, consists of seven days in most places, not six. Here, then, are the AMSR-E Arctic Sea ice losses for the past seven days:

22,969 square kilometers
34,687 square kilometers
18,594 square kilometers
2,500 square kilometers
22,500 square kilometers
94,531 square kilometers
109,688 square kilometers

That's a total of 305,469 square kilometers, or--look it up, if you wish--117,942.24 square miles. The state of Arizona is 113,998 square miles in area (and you can look that up, too, if you haven't already overtaxed your brain with all this math and research).

I have to be honest here: you make this far too easy...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:

South-Central U.S. continues to bake

The extreme heat continues again today after 269 high maximum and 250 high minimum temperature records were set yesterday, 19 and 29 of which were all-time records, respectively. 206 of yesterday's records were 110°F or higher. Yesterday, Reuters was reporting that Texas was one power plant shutdown away from rolling blackouts. The forecast today doesn't look any better. Heat index values up to 125° are forecast in eastern Texas and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

Particularly toasty heat index values from yesterday:

• Mobile, Alabama: 120°
• Arkadelphia, Arkansas: 121°
• Bay St. Louis, Mississippi: 121°
• Memphis, Tennessee: 122°



You warmists are fond of pointing out that extreme weather in a small region is no reflection on climate, unless, of course, it's hot weather. All of you conveniently ignore the freezing weather in the Southern Hemisphere that is killing people. You, in particular, why don't you ever post that? Hmmm?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
JFV/Palin 2012 ?



..ack!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 221 - 171

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29Blog Index

Top of Page

About RickyRood

I'm a professor at U Michigan and lead a course on climate change problem solving. These articles often come from and contribute to the course.