The Warming "Divine" Period begins

By: Patrap , 2:44 PM GMT on June 09, 2013

Share this Blog
15
+

It has arrived.

June 9 2013

When man began burning coal, then oil en masse,globally it was a God send we thought for Humanity.
Cheap abundant power for Industry and travel.

We could steam across Oceans and Rail across continents and Fly between Hemispheres daily.

Now, its clear and concise that our ego's outpaced our sanity.

Were warming at a rate so fast now since were at 400ppm CO2 that look at the Arctic Pole here.



Melt out at the Pole,not the edges.

The Damn Pole.

I'm sure Sen. Inhofe and the likes will punt,deflect,discount, obfuscate and BS the news.

It's what they do....

So when you see the Atlantic spitting out Hurricanes soon in the MDR like a Beagle whelping pups, reflect back to this date.

China and India will have there economic runs.

The CO2 will only escalate up the PPM scale.





The WV will be increasing by 10% for every 1F global increase in Fahrenheit.


But enjoy the er, "Divinity" for now.

Calamity will find you.

Europe is flooding today still.





Fill er up,...we've got to see Glacier National Park this Summer.





..or,well,..before, u know'.









Profile Visitor Map - Click to view visits
Create your own visitor map


Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 37 - 1

Page: 1 — Blog Index

37. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
12:21 AM GMT on June 14, 2013
Patrap has created a new entry.
36. zampaz
2:41 PM GMT on June 13, 2013
Love the music you share Patrap!
Even a small thing, like sharing a favorite tune, makes the world a brighter place.
-z
Member Since: February 2, 2011 Posts: 3 Comments: 904
35. Patrap
2:27 PM GMT on June 13, 2013
Day by day night after night....Blinded by the neon lights
Hurry here hustlin' there....No one's got the time to spare
Money's tight nothin' free....Won't somebody come and rescue me
I am stranded....Caught in the crossfire
Stranded....Caught in the crossfire.

Tooth for tooth eye for an eye....Sell your soul just to buy buy buy
Beggin' a dollar stealin' a dime....Come on can't you see that I
I am stranded....Caught in the crossfire
I am stranded....Caught in the crossfire.

I need some kind of kindness....Some kind of sympathy oh no
We're stranded....Caught in the crossfire

Save the strong lose the weak....Never turning the other cheek
Trust nobody don't be no fool....Whatever happened to the golden rule
We got stranded....Caught in the crossfire
We got stranded....Caught in the crossfire
We got stranded....Caught in the crossfire
Stranded....Caught in the crossfire
Help me




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
34. ycd0108
2:17 PM GMT on June 12, 2013
One way out:
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 179 Comments: 4637
33. Patrap
2:05 PM GMT on June 12, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
32. zampaz
12:36 AM GMT on June 12, 2013
Re: #29
Congress breaks my heart. The nation's political parties are selling this nation to special interest one liberty and one brick at a time as the world begins to smoulder. The EU or China will soon take on the roll of leadership in science and technology.
Member Since: February 2, 2011 Posts: 3 Comments: 904
31. Patrap
12:33 AM GMT on June 12, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
30. LowerCal
11:34 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
Grandstanding for the home crowd... sigh.
Member Since: July 26, 2006 Posts: 58 Comments: 9196
29. Patrap
11:25 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
Republican demands Obama apologize for funding climate change research

In a speech on the House floor Tuesday, Representative Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) called on President Barack Obama to apologize to the people of Oklahoma for funding climate change research.

The freshman congressman claimed global temperatures stopped rising a decade ago. He said variations in the Earth’s temperature were the result of solar output and ocean cycles.

“Even climate change alarmists admit the number of hurricanes hitting the U.S. and the number of tornado touchdowns have been on a slow decline for over 100 years,” Bridenstine said.

“But here is what we absolutely know,” he continued. “We know that Oklahoma will have tornadoes when the cold jet stream meets the warm Gulf air, and we also know that this President spends 30 times as much money on global warming research as he does on weather forecasting and warning. For this gross misallocation, the people of Oklahoma are ready to accept the President’s apology and I intend to submit legislation to fix this.”

A survey of 29,000 scientists published this year found a wide consensus that climate change was both real and driven by human activity. Less than 1 percent denied that humans were the primary cause of climate change.

- See more at: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/06/11/republican-d emands-obama-apologize-for-funding-climate-change- research/#sthash.fkkZzSuG.dpuf

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
27. unclemush
7:03 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
Great blog!
Member Since: July 7, 2001 Posts: 59 Comments: 13166
26. hydrus
2:09 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
That chart of the Arctic Ice situation is scary to say the least. I am not a gambler, but I am betting Mother Earth is going to provide many more unexpected phenomenon in short order. The methane is a bigger player than I thought, and I thought it was a big player already....Climate Change: Methane and CO2 in thawing Arctic permafrost a climate tipping point
by Takver - Climate IMC
Friday Nov 30th, 2012 8:42 PM

A new report on permafrost slowly thawing in the Arctic creating methane and carbon dioxide emissions highlights an approaching dangerous climate tipping point. There is a huge amount of organic matter frozen in permafrost, estimated to contain 1,700 gigatonnes of carbon, twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. And it is starting to melt. With no way to stop it except indirectly through us reducing the rate of global warming by reducing our own emissions.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21492
25. Patrap
1:33 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
Is a Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic?


Permafrost zones occupy nearly a quarter of the exposed land area of the Northern Hemisphere. NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment is probing deep into the frozen lands above the Arctic Circle in Alaska to measure emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane from thawing permafrost - signals that may hold a key to Earth's climate future. Image credit: Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal

Flying low and slow above the wild, pristine terrain of Alaska's North Slope in a specially instrumented NASA plane, research scientist Charles Miller of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., surveys the endless whiteness of tundra and frozen permafrost below. On the horizon, a long, dark line appears. The plane draws nearer, and the mysterious object reveals itself to be a massive herd of migrating caribou, stretching for miles. It's a sight Miller won't soon forget.

"Seeing those caribou marching single-file across the tundra puts what we're doing here in the Arctic into perspective," said Miller, principal investigator of the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE), a five-year NASA-led field campaign studying how climate change is affecting the Arctic's carbon cycle.

"The Arctic is critical to understanding global climate," he said. "Climate change is already happening in the Arctic, faster than its ecosystems can adapt. Looking at the Arctic is like looking at the canary in the coal mine for the entire Earth system."

Aboard the NASA C-23 Sherpa aircraft from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va., Miller, CARVE Project Manager Steve Dinardo of JPL and the CARVE science team are probing deep into the frozen lands above the Arctic Circle. The team is measuring emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane from thawing permafrost -- signals that may hold a key to Earth's climate future.

What Lies Beneath

Permafrost (perennially frozen) soils underlie much of the Arctic. Each summer, the top layers of these soils thaw. The thawed layer varies in depth from about 4 inches (10 centimeters) in the coldest tundra regions to several yards, or meters, in the southern boreal forests. This active soil layer at the surface provides the precarious foothold on which Arctic vegetation survives. The Arctic's extremely cold, wet conditions prevent dead plants and animals from decomposing, so each year another layer gets added to the reservoirs of organic carbon sequestered just beneath the topsoil.

Over hundreds of millennia, Arctic permafrost soils have accumulated vast stores of organic carbon - an estimated 1,400 to 1,850 petagrams of it (a petagram is 2.2 trillion pounds, or 1 billion metric tons). That's about half of all the estimated organic carbon stored in Earth's soils. In comparison, about 350 petagrams of carbon have been emitted from all fossil-fuel combustion and human activities since 1850. Most of this carbon is located in thaw-vulnerable topsoils within 10 feet (3 meters) of the surface.

But, as scientists are learning, permafrost - and its stored carbon - may not be as permanent as its name implies. And that has them concerned.

"Permafrost soils are warming even faster than Arctic air temperatures - as much as 2.7 to 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 to 2.5 degrees Celsius) in just the past 30 years," Miller said. "As heat from Earth's surface penetrates into permafrost, it threatens to mobilize these organic carbon reservoirs and release them into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and methane, upsetting the Arctic's carbon balance and greatly exacerbating global warming."

Current climate models do not adequately account for the impact of climate change on permafrost and how its degradation may affect regional and global climate. Scientists want to know how much permafrost carbon may be vulnerable to release as Earth's climate warms, and how fast it may be released.

CARVing Out a Better Understanding of Arctic Carbon

Enter CARVE. Now in its third year, this NASA Earth Ventures program investigation is expanding our understanding of how the Arctic's water and carbon cycles are linked to climate, as well as what effects fires and thawing permafrost are having on Arctic carbon emissions. CARVE is testing hypotheses that Arctic carbon reservoirs are vulnerable to climate warming, while delivering the first direct measurements and detailed regional maps of Arctic carbon dioxide and methane sources and demonstrating new remote sensing and modeling capabilities. About two dozen scientists from 12 institutions are participating.

"The Arctic is warming dramatically - two to three times faster than mid-latitude regions - yet we lack sustained observations and accurate climate models to know with confidence how the balance of carbon among living things will respond to climate change and related phenomena in the 21st century," said Miller. "Changes in climate may trigger transformations that are simply not reversible within our lifetimes, potentially causing rapid changes in the Earth system that will require adaptations by people and ecosystems."

The CARVE team flew test flights in 2011 and science flights in 2012. This April and May, they completed the first two of seven planned monthly campaigns in 2013, and they are currently flying their June campaign.

Each two-week flight campaign across the Alaskan Arctic is designed to capture seasonal variations in the Arctic carbon cycle: spring thaw in April/May, the peak of the summer growing season in June/July, and the annual fall refreeze and first snow in September/October. From a base in Fairbanks, Alaska, the C-23 flies up to eight hours a day to sites on Alaska's North Slope, interior and Yukon River Valley over tundra, permafrost, boreal forests, peatlands and wetlands.

The C-23 won't win any beauty contests - its pilots refer to it as "a UPS truck with a bad nose job." Inside, it's extremely noisy - the pilots and crew wear noise-cancelling headphones to communicate. "When you take the headphones off, it's like being at a NASCAR race," Miller quipped.

But what the C-23 lacks in beauty and quiet, it makes up for in reliability and its ability to fly "down in the mud," so to speak. Most of the time, it flies about 500 feet (152 meters) above ground level, with periodic ascents to higher altitudes to collect background data. Most airborne missions measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane do not fly as low. "CARVE shows you need to fly very close to the surface in the Arctic to capture the interesting exchanges of carbon taking place between Earth's surface and atmosphere," Miller said.

Onboard the plane, sophisticated instruments "sniff" the atmosphere for greenhouse gases. They include a very sensitive spectrometer that analyzes sunlight reflected from Earth's surface to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide. This instrument is an airborne simulator for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission to be launched in 2014. Other instruments analyze air samples from outside the plane for the same chemicals. Aircraft navigation data and basic weather data are also collected. Initial data are delivered to scientists within 12 hours. Air samples are shipped to the University of Colorado's Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research Stable Isotope Laboratory and Radiocarbon Laboratory in Boulder for analyses to determine the carbon's sources and whether it came from thawing permafrost.

Much of CARVE's science will come from flying at least three years, Miller says. "We are showing the power of using dependable, low-cost prop planes to make frequent, repeat measurements over time to look for changes from month to month and year to year."

Ground observations complement the aircraft data and are used to calibrate and validate them. The ground sites serve as anchor points for CARVE's flight tracks. Ground data include air samples from tall towers and measurements of soil moisture and temperature to determine whether soil is frozen, thawed or flooded.

A Tale of Two Greenhouse Gases

It's important to accurately characterize the soils and state of the land surfaces. There's a strong correlation between soil characteristics and release of carbon dioxide and methane. Historically, the cold, wet soils of Arctic ecosystems have stored more carbon than they have released. If climate change causes the Arctic to get warmer and drier, scientists expect most of the carbon to be released as carbon dioxide. If it gets warmer and wetter, most will be in the form of methane.

The distinction is critical. Molecule per molecule, methane is 22 times more potent as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide on a 100-year timescale, and 105 times more potent on a 20-year timescale. If just one percent of the permafrost carbon released over a short time period is methane, it will have the same greenhouse impact as the 99 percent that is released as carbon dioxide. Characterizing this methane to carbon dioxide ratio is a major CARVE objective.

There are other correlations between Arctic soil characteristics and the release of carbon dioxide and methane. Variations in the timing of spring thaw and the length of the growing season have a major impact on vegetation productivity and whether high northern latitude regions generate or store carbon.

CARVE is also studying wildfire impacts on the Arctic's carbon cycle. Fires in boreal forests or tundra accelerate the thawing of permafrost and carbon release. Detailed fire observation records since 1942 show the average annual number of Alaska wildfires has increased, and fires with burn areas larger than 100,000 acres are occurring more frequently, trends scientists expect to accelerate in a warming Arctic. CARVE's simultaneous measurements of greenhouse gases will help quantify how much carbon is released to the atmosphere from fires in Alaska - a crucial and uncertain element of its carbon budget.

Early Results

The CARVE science team is busy analyzing data from its first full year of science flights. What they're finding, Miller said, is both amazing and potentially troubling.

"Some of the methane and carbon dioxide concentrations we've measured have been large, and we're seeing very different patterns from what models suggest," Miller said. "We saw large, regional-scale episodic bursts of higher-than-normal carbon dioxide and methane in interior Alaska and across the North Slope during the spring thaw, and they lasted until after the fall refreeze. To cite another example, in July 2012 we saw methane levels over swamps in the Innoko Wilderness that were 650 parts per billion higher than normal background levels. That's similar to what you might find in a large city."

Ultimately, the scientists hope their observations will indicate whether an irreversible permafrost tipping point may be near at hand. While scientists don't yet believe the Arctic has reached that tipping point, no one knows for sure. "We hope CARVE may be able to find that 'smoking gun,' if one exists," Miller said.

Other institutions participating in CARVE include City College of New York; the joint University of Colorado/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, Colo.; San Diego State University; University of California, Irvine; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.; University of California, Berkeley; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.; University of California, Santa Barbara; NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colo.; and University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

For more information on CARVE, visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/carve/ .



Alan Buis
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-354-0474
Alan.buis@jpl.nasa.gov
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
24. pcola57
1:20 PM GMT on June 11, 2013
Thanks for the blog Pat..
interesting data..
I guess when reality finally hits home to folks that the climate has been accelerate into an almost un-livable condition by mans ego, all we will have left are the pictures, memories and songs..

Thanks Pat.. :)
Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6854
23. Patrap
9:05 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
Thanks tkeith
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
22. tkeith
9:02 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
It's good to see your blog back up and going again Pat.

Welcome back...

Member Since: November 1, 2004 Posts: 25 Comments: 8936
21. mikatnight
8:19 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
Member Since: October 18, 2005 Posts: 4 Comments: 3052
20. Patrap
8:18 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
19. Patrap
8:07 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
I'm in Granby, Colorado this week for the American Geophysical Union's Chapman Conference on Climate Change Communication. Many of the talks will be webcast live; you can see a list of the talks (times in MDT) here. My talk, "The Weather Underground Experience," is scheduled for Monday at 4:30 pm MDT. I'll give a 15-minute overview of the history of wunderground, and what I've learned about communicating weather and climate change information along the way. There is live tweeting going on from the conference, #climatechapman. My blog updates this week may be somewhat random as a result of the conference, but I'm not seeing anything in the tropics worthy of discussion at this point

Jeff Masters

American Geophysical Union's Chapman Conference on Climate Change
Live Video
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
18. Patrap
8:05 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
Thanks NavarreMark
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
17. NavarreMark
7:57 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
An outstanding blog Pat.
Member Since: September 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 3980
16. greentortuloni
4:46 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
The two things I noticed about your graph:

transport of 3+ meter ice out of the arctic circle

for a huge section of the arctic, and not near the edge, it took approx 3 weeks for 2.5 meter ice to become 1 meter ice. That sort of suggests that by the June 21 a lot of that area will be open water and storing heat.

THis means most of July and August with open water and continued multi meter ice being transported out.

This could be the year the north pole route opens up.
Member Since: June 5, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1220
15. Patrap
12:38 PM GMT on June 10, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
14. Patrap
1:47 AM GMT on June 10, 2013

Hey Jude, don't make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better

Hey Jude, don't be afraid
You were made to go out and get her
The minute you let her under your skin
Then you begin to make it better

And anytime you feel the pain, hey Jude, refrain
Don't carry the world upon your shoulders
For well you know that it's a fool who plays it cool
By making his world a little colder
Na na na, na na, na na na na

Hey Jude, don't let me down
You have found her, now go and get her
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better

So let it out and let it in, hey Jude, begin
You're waiting for someone to perform with
And don't you know that it's just you? Hey Jude, you'll do
The movement you need is on your shoulder

Na na na, na na, na na na na, yeah

Hey Jude, don't make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her under your skin
Then you begin to make it better
Better, better, better, better, better, oh!

Na na na, na-na na na
Na-na na na, hey Jude
Na na na, na-na na na
Na-na na na, hey Jude


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
13. zampaz
12:20 AM GMT on June 10, 2013
Who needs that difficult science and math and modeling stuff anyway?
Quoting Bastardi:
"The weather is a movie, so we have to keep an eye on what the director is up to."

-z
Member Since: February 2, 2011 Posts: 3 Comments: 904
12. drs2008
11:30 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Nice blog Pat. Just moved from biloxi to myrtle beach.
Member Since: July 4, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 197
10. zampaz
7:11 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Hi Patrap!
Addressing climate change presents an opportunity for humanity to work together to find a balance with our fragile ecosystem. The question is whether the voice of science and reason can overcome the objections of the voices in power that wish to maintain the economic status quo.
The US, governed by two parties that represent two sides of the same coin, will not take the lead as a nation in addressing climate change or sustainable energy. We could. We should. We won't.

The good news is that in our ever more networked world-community individuals may take action themselves to reduce their own carbon footprints.

Hope the weather is good for you for the Robert Plant concert, wish I could be there!
I really appreciate your posts on Dr. Masters blog. I'm learning a lot from you, Skyepony and others.
You're a positive force in the wunderground, and hence the world. Thank you for sharing.
-z


Member Since: February 2, 2011 Posts: 3 Comments: 904
9. ycd0108
6:59 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Glacier National Park
Montana or B.C.?
Meet ya there.
Guess we'd best start to Planet now and then meander off to cool off at the North Pool.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 179 Comments: 4637
8. Patrap
6:17 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Thanks John'

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
7. JohnLonergan
6:13 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Nice job, Patrap My first visit to your blog, but like MacArther "I shall return."

BTW, Just linking Mongo Jerry gets a plus.
Member Since: June 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 3398
6. Patrap
5:25 PM GMT on June 09, 2013


Chapman Conference


The goal of this Chapman Conference is to bring together scholars, social scientists, and journalists to discuss both the history and recent advances in the understanding of climate science and how to communicate that science to policymakers, the media, and society. A research agenda of the conference will focus on the efficacy of scientific communication, with ideas on improved practices arising as an outcome from collaborations spawned at the conference.

This exploration will take place through: 1) discussions covering the history of climate science and successes and failures in communicating scientific ideas to the policy makers and public; 2) an assessment of where we are with respect to current knowledge of climate science and its communication and acceptance by society; 3) a comparison with experiences in other areas producing similar difficulties between scientific knowledge dissemination, societal acceptance of that knowledge, and governance.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
5. Patrap
5:12 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Thanks for stopping by my West Coast Bro's.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
4. LowerCal
5:09 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Mankind... frozen at the controls. :^\
Member Since: July 26, 2006 Posts: 58 Comments: 9196
3. PedleyCA
5:04 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Faster and Faster....... Nice Blog Pat,
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5955
2. Patrap
4:41 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
1. Patrap
4:34 PM GMT on June 09, 2013
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871

Viewing: 37 - 1

Page: 1 — Blog Index

Top of Page

About Patrap

Patrap's Recent Photos

Personal Weather Stations

Uptown
New Orleans, LA
Elevation: 20 ft
Temperature: 76.8 °F
Dew Point: 76.8 °F
Humidity: 100%
Wind: 2.2 mph from the East
Wind Gust: 4.7 mph
Updated: 11:17 PM CDT on September 30, 2014

About Personal Weather Stations