Casual Astronomy, Spaceflight News and Lower California Weather

Crescent Venus in Binoculars  (see comment 140)                                                               Shuttle Discovery Launch, No Earlier Than November 30  (see blog entry & comment 84) 

By: LowerCal, 2:47 AM GMT on October 22, 2010

CURRENT MOON

moon phases

CURRENT PLANETS
• Bright & reddish Mars setting WSW soon after dusk
• Brilliant off-white Jupiter ESE after dusk, sets west early morning
• Brilliant & blueish star Sirius rises ESE before midnight, SSW at dawn
• Bright & yellowish Saturn rises east before dawn, ESE at dawn
• Brilliant white Venus rising ESE before sunrise

Directions and times are for the northern subtropics and vary somewhat for other latitudes.


Scroll past the links below to find special events for current and future dates.
Scroll farther to find past events.


***** Links *****

Today - SpaceWeather.com
also EarthSky,
365 Days of Astronomy
& Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine
This Week - SkyandTelescope.com - This Week's Sky at a Glance
also Jack Horkheimer - Star Gazer, Current Scripts
This Month - SkyandTelescope.com - Sky Tour Podcasts
also HubbleSite - Tonight's Sky: Your guide to constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and events
Anytime - Stellarium (free planetarium for your computer)
also Sky & Telescope Interactive Sky Chart (online planetarium)

Visible Satellites:
Simplest - Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com
More satellites and more info - Heavens-Above.com.

Launches:
Spaceflight Now - Worldwide Launch Schedule
also Vandenberg AFB Launch Schedule
& Wallops Flight Facility Launch Webcast & Blog
Reentries - Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies - Upcoming & Recent Reentries

Live Aurora Cams:
Kiruna, Sweden
also Sodankyla, Finland
& Yellowknife, Canada (click on CONNECT AURORAMAX LIVE)


Most events described below can be viewed with your eyes alone.
Occasionally simple binoculars will improve the view and that will be noted.


***** Current & Future Events *****

Lunar Apogee (Greek apo, away from + Greek Gaia, Earth)

Image credit: Pearson Scott Foresman

Exact at
November 15
11:48 GMT
6:48am EDT
3:48am PDT.

The Moon is at its farthest distance in its non circular orbit around Earth. The Moon is about 12% farther than at its closest distance (perigee - Greek peri, near + Greek Gaia, Earth) and the Moon's gravitational influence on Earth and its oceans is about 20% less (due to the inverse square law).


Shuttle Discovery Launch, STS-133 Mission & Landing + Double Spacecraft Flyovers

Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder

Mission: STS-133
Spacecraft & Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Discovery

Launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida
targeted for
November 1
2040 GMT ±5min
4:40pm EDT ±5min (local time)
1:40pm PDT ±5min.
NET (No Earlier Than)
November 2
2017 GMT ±5min
4:17pm EDT ±5min (local time)
1:17pm PDT ±5min.
NET (No Earlier Than)
November 3
1952 GMT ±5min
3:52pm EDT ±5min (local time)
12:52pm PDT ±5min.
NET (No Earlier Than)
November 4
1929 GMT ±5min
3:29pm EDT ±5min (local time)
12:29pm PDT ±5min.
November 5
1904 GMT ±5min
3:04pm EDT ±5min (local time)
12:04pm PDT ±5min.
November 8
1753 GMT ±5min
12:53pm EST ±5min (local time)
9:53am PST ±5min.

NET (No Earlier Than)
November 30
0902 GMT ±5min
4:02am EST ±5min (local time)
1:02am PST ±5min.


Docking with ISS (International Space Station)
November 3
1718 GMT
1:18 EDT
10:18 PDT.
November 5
1636 GMT
12:36pm EDT
9:36am PDT.


Undocking from ISS
November 10
1040 GMT
5:40am EST
2:40am PST.
November 12
1002 GMT
5:02am EST
2:02am PST.


Landing at Kennedy Space Center
November 12
1538 GMT
10:38am EST
5:38am PST.
November 14
1359 GMT
9:59am EST
6:59am PST.


Find (when published) landing options at NASA - Launch and Landing
and the landing paths (when published) at NASA - STS-133 Landing Ground Tracks.

Launch status updates at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

You can follow the progress of the Space Shuttle mission online at
Spaceflight Now | STS-133 Shuttle Report | Mission Status Center
and
NASA - Space Shuttle.

You can dig for more info at
Spaceflight Now - Index of /shuttle/sts133
and
CBS News Space Place - Space Shuttle Status Report.

Live online coverage of the mission will be on NASA TV - see the NASA TV Schedule.


WunderPhoto: SPACECRAFT by Westerberg Wednesday June 20, 2007

Between launch and docking with the ISS & undocking and landing it may be possible to sight both craft in the sky at the same time. Shuttle Atlantis and the ISS will be making visible passes over North America between launch and docking.

Check satellite pass predictions at
Heavens-Above
or try the simpler tool at
Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com.


Events earlier than those listed below will be found in previous blog entries.

***** Past Events *****

Moon Rides with Jupiter (& Jupiter's Moons)

October 18-20
These nights the Moon will travel with the brilliant off-white planet Jupiter. Through binoculars as many as four of Jupiter's largest moons can be seen.

Interactive Animation of Jupiter's Moons
- Current, Past and Future


Orionid Meteor Shower Peak

October 21, Before Dawn

In some years the Orionid meteor shower makes strong showing but will be washed out this year by the nearly full moon. Only a few, the very brightest, will be visible this year.


○ Full Moon

WunderPhoto: Harvest Moon by quickeye Wednesday September 22, 2010

Exact at
October 23
0136 GMT
October 22
9:36pm EST
6:36pm PST.

Rises near sunset and sets near sunrise. At those times the Moon may seem huge (the Moon illusion) and unusually colored. The yellow/orange/red appearance of the Moon at the horizon is at least partly for the same reason the sky appears blue!




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are aligned resulting in stronger tides - higher highs, lower lows and faster flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Moon Rides the Bull

October 24-26, Mid-Evening through Dawn
These nights the Moon will appear in the constellation Taurus the Bull. Taurus contains two of the closest open star clusters. These star clusters are visible to the eye alone and impressive through binoculars.

October 24 the Moon will be closest to the Pleiades star cluster also known as the Seven Sisters.

Pleiades Star Cluster (The Seven Sisters)

pleiades by gardenguy Sunday October 17, 2010

With well corrected vision the Pleiades appear as 6 or 7 moderately bright stars in the pattern of a tiny pot with a handle.

October 25 the Moon will pass a roughly equal distance from the Pleiades and the Hyades star cluster.

Hyades Star Cluster

Image credit: Zbigniew Kawalec

The bright and orange star Aldeberan is the brightest star and glaring right eye of the constellation Taurus the Bull. With binoculars you can easily see the "V" shaped pattern of stars that forms the rest of the face of the bull. That collection of stars is the Hyades star cluster.

October 26 the Moon appears between the horns of Taurus the Bull.

October 26, Mid-Evening

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


Resupply Mission to the International Space Station
Image credit: NASA/Mark Bowman

Mission: Flight 40P to ISS (cargo/resupply)
Spacecraft: Progress M-08M
Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-U
Launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
October 27
8:11pm AQTT (Aqtobe Time, local time)
1511 GMT
11:11am EDT
8:11am PDT.

Docking with ISS
October 30
8:39pm MSD (Moscow Summer Time)
1639 GMT
12:39pm EDT
9:39am PDT.

Launch status updates at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

Live coverage of the docking will be on NASA TV - see the NASA TV Schedule.

(ISS) + Double Spacecraft Flyovers


WunderPhoto: Endeavour and the ISS by WeatheringHeights Tuesday March 25, 2008

Between launch and docking with the ISS it may be possible to sight both craft in the sky at the same time.

Check satellite pass predictions at
Heavens-Above
or try the simpler tool at
Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com.


Moon Visits the Twins

October 28-29, Early Morning
These mornings the Moon will visit the constellation Gemini the Twins. The stars Castor and Pollux are the brightest stars in the constellation and mark the heads to the twins they are named after.

October 29, Half an Hour after Midnight

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


◑ Last (or Third) Quarter Moon

Exact at
October 30
1246 GMT
8:46am EDT
5:46am PDT.

Rises near midnight and sets near noon. Morning crescent moons for a week after. Each one thinner and closer to the eastern horizon.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are at right angles resulting in weaker tides - lower highs, higher lows and slower flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Moon Travels with the Lion

October 31 & November 1, Early Morning
These mornnings the fat crescent moon will appear near the bright and blueish star Regulus. Regulus is the brightest star and heart of the constellation Leo the Lion. Regulus is the "dot" on a pattern of stars shaped like a backward question mark that forms mane and chest of the lion.

October 31, Two Hours before Dawn

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


Lunar Perigee (Greek peri, near + Greek Gaia, Earth)

Image credit: Pearson Scott Foresman

Exact at
November 3
1723 GMT
1:23pm EDT
10:23am PDT.

The Moon is at its closest distance in its non circular orbit around Earth. The Moon is about 10.5% closer than at its farthest distance (apogee - Greek apo, away from + Greek Gaia, Earth) and the Moon's gravitational influence on Earth and its oceans is about 25% greater (due to the inverse square law).


Thin Crescent with Saturn & Spica

November 4 at Dawn
This morning an extremely thin crescent moon will appear low in the ESE below the bright and yellowish planet Saturn. Nearer the Moon and below it is the bright and blueish star Spica. Spica is the brightest star of the constellation Virgo the Virgin. Spica marks the spike of wheat held in her left hand.


Thin Crescent with Venus

November 5 before Sunrise
This morning in the brightening dawn the thin crescent moon will appear low in the ESE just below the brilliant white planet Venus.


Vandenberg Delta II Launch

Photo source: www.vandenberg.af.mil

Mission: COSMO-SkyMed 4
Launch Vehicle: Delta II 7420-10

Launch from Vandenberg AFB, California
October 30
November 1
November 2
November 3
November 5

November 6
0220 GMT
October 29
October 31
November 1
November 2
November 4

November 5
10:20pm EDT
7:20pm PDT (local time).

Launch status updates are at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

More details may appear on a launch blog at
Spaceflight Now | Delta Launch Report | Mission Status Center
as the launch date nears.

You can find more info on the mission at
United Launch Alliance.

A live webcast will begin 1 hour and 5 minutes before launch.


Dark Moon (a.k.a. astronomical new moon)

Exact at
November 6
0452 GMT
12:52am EDT
November 5
9:52pm PDT.

Lower and thinner morning crescent moons the week before. Higher and thicker evening crescent moons the week after.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are aligned resulting in stronger tides - higher highs, lower lows and faster flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


) Thinnest Evening Crescent Moon (the original meaning of "new moon")

WunderPhoto: Brand New Moon by Ohlen Wednesday June 4, 2008

November 6, 7 or 8
Low in the western sky soon after sunset.

Earliest and thinnest sightings of the new moon may be possible from southern South America and the eastern South Pacific November 6. Progressively easier sightings will be possible from New Zealand, Australia, southern Asia, Middle and Near East, Africa, southern Europe and the Americas from southern Canada southward November 7. Sighting from almost all of the rest of the world will be possible November 8.

See the visibility maps at Moonsighting.com.


Switch from Daylight Saving Time, U.S. & Canada

Image credit: MT0

November 7
2:00am DT = 1:00am ST

This day will have 25 hours in most areas of the United States and Canada. If you don't want to stay up until 2AM to make the change just set your clock back one hour the evening before and you can use that extra hour for sleep. 3^)


◐ First Quarter Moon

Exact at
November 13
1639 GMT
11:39am EST
8:39am PST.

Rises near noon and sets near midnight. Evening crescent moons for a week before. Each one thicker and higher above the western horizon.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are at right angles resulting in weaker tides - lower highs, higher lows and slower flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


web counterVisitor Map
Create your own visitor map!

Updated: 6:02 PM GMT on November 15, 2010

Permalink

Zero-G Coffee Mug  (see comment 70)                                                                        Full Hunter's Moon, October 22/23                                                                             

By: LowerCal, 12:21 AM GMT on October 03, 2010

CURRENT MOON

moon phases

CURRENT PLANETS
• Bright & reddish Mars very low WSW at dusk, sets soon after dark
• Brilliant off-white Jupiter low ESE at dusk, sets west before dawn
• Brilliant & blueish star Sirius rises ESE after midnight, south at dawn
• Bright & yellowish Saturn rising east at dawn

Directions and times are for the northern subtropics and vary somewhat for other latitudes.


Scroll past the links below to find special events for current and future dates.
Scroll farther to find past events.


***** Links *****

Today - SpaceWeather.com
also EarthSky,
365 Days of Astronomy
& Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine
This Week - SkyandTelescope.com - This Week's Sky at a Glance
also Jack Horkheimer - Star Gazer, Current Scripts
This Month - SkyandTelescope.com - Sky Tour Podcasts
also HubbleSite - Tonight's Sky: Your guide to constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and events
Anytime - Stellarium (free planetarium for your computer)
also Sky & Telescope Interactive Sky Chart (online planetarium)

Visible Satellites:
Simplest - Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com
More satellites and more info - Heavens-Above.com.

Launches:
Spaceflight Now - Worldwide Launch Schedule
also Vandenberg AFB Launch Schedule
& Wallops Flight Facility Launch Webcast & Blog
Reentries - Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies - Upcoming & Recent Reentries

Live Aurora Cams:
Kiruna, Sweden
also Sodankyla, Finland
& Yellowknife, Canada (click on CONNECT AURORAMAX LIVE)


Most events described below can be viewed with your eyes alone.
Occasionally simple binoculars will improve the view and that will be noted.


***** Current & Future Events *****

○ Full Moon

WunderPhoto: Harvest Moon by quickeye Wednesday September 22, 2010

Exact at
October 23
0136 GMT
October 22
9:36pm EST
6:36pm PST.

Rises near sunset and sets near sunrise. At those times the Moon may seem huge (the Moon illusion) and unusually colored. The yellow/orange/red appearance of the Moon at the horizon is at least partly for the same reason the sky appears blue!




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are aligned resulting in stronger tides - higher highs, lower lows and faster flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Moon Rides the Bull

October 24-26, Mid-Evening through Dawn
These nights the Moon will appear in the constellation Taurus the Bull. Taurus contains two of the closest open star clusters. These star clusters are visible to the eye alone and impressive through binoculars.

October 24 the Moon will be closest to the Pleiades star cluster also known as the Seven Sisters.

Pleiades Star Cluster (The Seven Sisters)

pleiades by gardenguy Sunday October 17, 2010

With well corrected vision the Pleiades appear as 6 or 7 moderately bright stars in the pattern of a tiny pot with a handle.

October 25 the Moon will roughly equal distance from the Pleiades and the Hyades star cluster.

Hyades Star Cluster

Image credit: Zbigniew Kawalec

The bright and orange star Aldeberan is the brightest star and glaring right eye of the constellation Taurus the Bull. With binoculars you can easily see the "V" shaped pattern of stars that forms the rest of the face of the bull. That collection of stars is the Hyades star cluster.

October 26 the Moon appears between the horns of Taurus the Bull.

October 26, Mid-Evening

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


Resupply Mission to the International Space Station (ISS) + Double Spacecraft Flyovers

Image credit: NASA/Mark Bowman

Mission: Flight 40P to ISS (cargo/resupply)
Spacecraft: Progress M-08M
Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-U
Launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
October 27
8:11pm AQTT (Aqtobe Time, local time)
1511 GMT
11:11am EDT
8:11am PDT.

Docking with ISS
October 30
8:39pm MSD (Moscow Summer Time)
1639 GMT
12:39pm EDT
9:39am PDT.

Launch status updates at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

Live coverage of the docking will be on NASA TV - see the NASA TV Schedule.


WunderPhoto: Endeavour and the ISS by WeatheringHeights Tuesday March 25, 2008

Between launch and docking with the ISS it may be possible to sight both craft in the sky at the same time.

Check satellite pass predictions at
Heavens-Above
or try the simpler tool at
Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com.


Moon Visits the Twins

October 28-29, Early Morning
These mornings the Moon will visit the constellation Gemini the Twins. The stars Castor and Pollux are the brightest stars in the constellation and mark the heads to the twins they are named after.

October 29, Half an Hour after Midnight

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


Vandenberg Delta II Launch

Photo source: www.vandenberg.af.mil

Mission: COSMO-SkyMed 4
Launch Vehicle: Delta II 7420-10

Launch from Vandenberg AFB, California
October 30
0220 GMT
October 29
10:20pm EDT
7:20pm PDT (local time).

Launch status updates are at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

More details may appear on a launch blog at
Spaceflight Now | Delta Launch Report | Mission Status Center
as the launch date nears.

You can find more info on the mission at
United Launch Alliance
along with a link to a live webcast that will begin 1 hour and 5 minutes before launch.


◑ Last (or Third) Quarter Moon

Exact at
October 30
1246 GMT
8:46am EDT
5:46am PDT.

Rises near midnight and sets near noon. Morning crescent moons for a week after. Each one thinner and closer to the eastern horizon.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are at right angles resulting in weaker tides - lower highs, higher lows and slower flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Events earlier than those listed below will be found in previous blog entries.

***** Past Events *****

◑ Last (or Third) Quarter Moon

Exact at
October 1
0352 GMT
September 30
11:52pm EDT
8:52pm PDT.

Rises near midnight and sets near noon. Morning crescent moons for a week after. Each one thinner and closer to the eastern horizon.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are at right angles resulting in weaker tides - lower highs, higher lows and slower flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Moon Faces the Lion


October 4, Before Dawn
This mornning the Moon will appear near the bright and blueish star Regulus. Regulus is the brightest star and heart of the constellation Leo the Lion. Regulus is the "dot" on a pattern of stars shaped like a backward question mark that forms mane and chest of the lion.


Lunar Perigee (Greek peri, near + Greek Gaia, Earth)

Image credit: Pearson Scott Foresman

Exact at
October 6
1342 GMT
9:42am EDT
6:42am PDT.

The Moon is at its closest distance in its non circular orbit around Earth. The Moon is about 10.5% closer than at its farthest distance (apogee - Greek apo, away from + Greek Gaia, Earth) and the Moon's gravitational influence on Earth and its oceans is about 25% greater (due to the inverse square law).


Dark Moon (a.k.a. astronomical new moon)

Exact at
October 7
1844 GMT
2:44pm EDT
11:44am PDT.

Lower and thinner morning crescent moons the week before. Higher and thicker evening crescent moons the week after.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are aligned resulting in stronger tides - higher highs, lower lows and faster flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Launch of ISS Expedition 25/26 Crew + Double Spacecraft Flyovers

Photo credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi

Mission: Expedition 25/26 to the International Space Station (ISS)
Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA-01M
Launch Vehicle: Soyuz FG
Launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
October 8
4:10am AQTT (Aqtobe Time, local time)
October 7
2310 GMT
7:10pm EDT
4:10pm PDT.

Docking with ISS
October 10
4:01am MSD (Moscow Summer Time)
0001 GMT
October 9
8:01pm EDT
5:01pm PDT.

The remaining three members of the Expedition 25 crew will join the three already aboard the International Space Station.

Updates at
Spaceflight Now | Tracking Station | Worldwide launch schedule.

You can follow the progress of the mission at NASA - Expedition 25.

Live coverage of the launch and docking will appear on NASA TV - see the NASA TV Schedule.


WunderPhoto: SPACECRAFT by Westerberg Wednesday June 20, 2007

Between launch and docking with the ISS it may be possible to sight both craft in the sky at the same time.

Check satellite pass predictions at
Heavens-Above
or try the simpler tool at
Satellite Flybys by SpaceweatherPhone.com.


) Thinnest Evening Crescent Moon (the original meaning of "new moon")

WunderPhoto: One day old Moon by LaddObservatory Friday June 15, 2007

October 8, 9 or 10
Low in the western sky soon after sunset.

Earliest and thinnest sightings of the new moon may be possible from the South Indian Ocean October 8. Progressively easier sightings may be possible from southern Africa, the South Atlantic Ocean, South America, the Caribbean, Central America and all but the northern East Pacific Ocean October 9. Sighting from the rest of the world except for northern Asia, northernmost Europe, and northernmost North America may be possible October 10.

See the visibility maps at Moonsighting.com.


Photo Op: Thin Crescent, Venus & Mars

October 9, 20 Minutes after Sunset

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.

This evening very low above the WSW horizon: the brilliant white planet Venus, a thin crescent moon and the bright and reddish planet Mars appear in close proximity. Binoculars will be necessary to see Mars by eye.


Moon Bites the Scorpion

October 10-11, Early Evening
These evenings the Moon travels the sky close to the bright and reddish star Antares. Antares is the brightest star and beating heart of the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion.

October 10, One Hour after Sunset

Image created with Stellarium, a free download.


◐ First Quarter Moon

Exact at
October 14
2127 GMT
5:27pm EDT
2:27pm PDT.

Rises near noon and sets near midnight. Evening crescent moons for a week before. Each one thicker and higher above the western horizon.




Image from: Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Renewable Energy

The gravitational pull of the Moon accounts for about 2/3 of the influence on Earth's tides with the Sun accounting for the remaining 1/3. On this date the gravitational pull of the Moon and Sun are at right angles resulting in weaker tides - lower highs, higher lows and slower flows. (Due to the huge mass and volume of the ocean's water the tidal effect lags behind the phases of the Moon. The delay can be as long as three days at some times and places.)

Also see The Moon And Tides.


Lunar Apogee (Greek apo, away from + Greek Gaia, Earth)

Image credit: Pearson Scott Foresman

Exact at
October 18
18:19 GMT
2:19pm EDT
11:19am PDT.

The Moon is at its farthest distance in its non circular orbit around Earth. The Moon is about 12% farther than at its closest distance (perigee - Greek peri, near + Greek Gaia, Earth) and the Moon's gravitational influence on Earth and its oceans is about 20% less (due to the inverse square law).


Moon Rides with Jupiter (& Jupiter's Moons)

October 18-20
These nights the Moon will travel with the brilliant off-white planet Jupiter. Through binoculars as many as four of Jupiter's largest moons can be seen.

Interactive Animation of Jupiter's Moons
- Current, Past and Future


Orionid Meteor Shower Peak

October 21, Before Dawn

In some years the Orionid meteor shower makes strong showing but will be washed out this year by the nearly full moon. Only a few, the very brightest, will be visible this year.


web counterVisitor Map
Create your own visitor map!

Updated: 12:12 AM GMT on October 22, 2010

Permalink

About LowerCal

Astronomy with a minimum of terminology and technology.

LowerCal's Recent Photos

Personal Weather Stations

APRSWXNET Woodland Hills CA US
Calabasas, CA
Elevation: 984 ft
Temperature: 51.0 °F
Dew Point: 34.0 °F
Humidity: 53%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 2.0 mph
Updated: 5:33 AM PST on December 01, 2013
At Gonzales Drive
Woodland Hills, CA
Elevation: 984 ft
Temperature: 71.5 °F
Dew Point: 45.9 °F
Humidity: 40%
Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 0.0 mph
Updated: 10:13 AM PDT on October 30, 2014

About Personal Weather Stations