Tropical Tidbits from the Tundra

Disturbance in the Bahamas

By: Levi32, 3:39 PM GMT on June 22, 2006

Update: NHC Tropical Outlook:

000
ABNT20 KNHC 222118
TWOAT
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
530 PM EDT THU JUN 22 2006

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

PRESSURES ARE GRADUALLY FALLING NORTHEAST OF THE BAHAMAS WHERE A BROAD SURFACE CIRCULATION APPEARS TO BE FORMING. UPPER-LEVEL WINDS COULD BECOME A LITTLE MORE FAVORABLE FOR SLOW DEVELOPMENT DURING THE NEXT DAY OR SO...AS THE SYSTEM DRIFTS TOWARD THE WEST-
NORTHWEST.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL STORM FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED THROUGH FRIDAY.

$$

FORECASTER AVILA/MAINELLI

The non-tropical disturbance in the Bahamas remains disorganized this morning. The system has a new look, with it actually part of the tail end of the cold front which tried to pick it up yesterday. There is less deep convection than yesterday, with the majority of it just north of Hispaniola, far from where the LLC would form if the system develops. Right now there is a well-defined mid-upper level circulation at roughly 27n 80w, with a strong surface trough under it. A small batch of convection is flaring on the east side of the circulation not far from the center, but all convection to the west of the center has faded since last night.

Wind shear has decreased to 10-20 knots overnight, which should allow more convection to develop at least later tonight during the diurnal maximum. An 850mb vorticity max has also developed just north of the mid-level center on analysis maps. Models have backed off some on development, but the GFS, NAM, and CMC all still develop some potent little system moving toward Florida or the Carolinas. I will not forecast any track or intensity until this system is well on its way to a depression, if it becomes one at all. We will see what happens with the lowered shear today, but remember this system isn’t fully tropical yet. Images and links are below:

Close-up Visible Loop (from nasa site)

CIMSS Satellite Winds and other Analysis

SSD Tropical Formation Maps

Navy Site (in case invest forms)

Nassau, Bahamas Radar Loop (sporadic images anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours apart, also it is not functioning at the moment, but should be back online soon)



Click on the above image for the latest full-sized image (this image doesn't update by itself) and access to an animation.

Updated: 10:07 PM GMT on June 22, 2006

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Bahamas Disturbance......TD #2?

By: Levi32, 6:16 PM GMT on June 21, 2006

The disturbance in the Bahamas is looking better than ever this morning. It is apparently splitting in two parts; one moving north with the trough, the other will stay behind and sit a while near or east of the Bahamas. This latter piece is the one I have been watching for several days now, and it seems to be getting something going. A small blob of convection has been persisting since last night, and air is starting to flow towards it. Winds on the east side of the blob are from the SSE, and winds on the west side are from the ENE, indicating a strong surface reflection is forming.

15-25 knot shear is still inhibiting the convection, which is tending to blow to the east side of where I think an LLC would form. If you use your imagination on the visible loops, you can almost see an LLC forming, but it is too early to tell. Wind shear is expected to weaken some over the Bahamas, which would help this system greatly. It should be noted that Alberto formed in the face of greater shear than this disturbance is going through right now. The SSTs in the area are also very warm for this time of year, so chances of development are greatly enhanced. If this blob of convection persists until tonight, then I think the diurnal max will greatly help this disturbance to better organize, and an LLC could form by then.

I am not forecasting TD 2 yet. But I guess you could say I already have since Rich and I are betting on its development. So I am rooting for it so to speak lol. Most of the models including the GFS form at least something moving from the Bahamas to either Florida or the Carolinas. Right now all we can do is watch and wait.

Close-up Visible Loop (from nasa site)

CIMSS Satellite Winds and other Analysis

SSD Tropical Formation Maps

Navy Site (in case invest forms)

Nassau, Bahamas Radar Loop (sporadic images anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours apart, also it is not functioning at the moment, but should be back online soon)



Click above image for latest full-sized image (this image will not update by itself) and access to animation.

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My Little Wave in the Bahamas

By: Levi32, 3:44 PM GMT on June 20, 2006

I am watching two disturbed areas in the tropics this morning. One is a strong tropical wave in the eastern Caribbean, which may have a shot at development if it survives the strong shear. Right now it remains well-defined but very disorganized. If it can bust through thet shear zone, it might organize over the western Caribbean.

The other area of interest is my little disurbance in the Bahamas. In my opinion this system looks better than the Caribbean wave. Convection isn't that strong right now, but it has consolidated into two main areas overnight. This disturbance is a cut off upper low near Miami, Florida. Shear is moderately strong over the area, mainly caused by the upper low itself. There is a trough coming through the eastern United States, which will try to pick up the disturbance today and tomorrow, but the models say it won't get picked up. The GFS has a weakening depression moving west over Florida in 2-3 days, and the NAM has a full-blown depression developing and moving NW toward north Florida and Georgia.

The GFS has been consistantly forecasting development of this system to begin today. This could be, since itcontinues to become better organized. However, I would like to see either of two things happen. The upper low is over Miami, but the disturbance itself is over the Bahamas. Thus, they are seperated, which is shearing the wave. So one, I would like to see the upper low move over the disturbed weather, or two, the upper low backs away from the wave. I think the latter is more likely here. It is also the best solution for the wave, since this would be a classic upper low backing away leaving wave under ridge type of thing. Also the wave in the Caribbean might start devlivering some extra heat into the deal as it moves west. Anyway we will see what happens today. Things should start getting really interesting by tomorrow morning at the latest. Right now the Bahamas is THE area to watch for tropical development.

Zoomed-in visible loop


Free image hosting

Updated: 5:27 PM GMT on June 20, 2006

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I'm Staying....but I'm in Training

By: Levi32, 4:46 PM GMT on June 17, 2006

Everyone's wonderful advice and wisdom has helped me think with renewed keeness about this situation. Therefore, after a couple days thinking about it, I have decided not to leave wunderground entirely, but to stay on and severely cut my blogging time until I have learned to control my addiction. I do believe this is what I should do, and you will all be seeing much less of me, but I'm not completely gone. Sorry, but you are all stuck with me lol! My blog will probably not be updated again until the next tropical depression forms. I just have to be on here during the hurricanes lol. Meanwhile, ¡Hasta luego! Oh yeah, those blobs in the Atlantic! Driving me crazy!

Adopt your own useless blob!

Adopt your own useless blob!

Wait a minute, this icy thing doesn't belong in the tropics! What the heck snow in Puerto Rico? I've got to put a stop this lol! These blobs are taking over!

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I AM LEAVING WUNDERGROUND FOR A WHILE

By: Levi32, 8:13 PM GMT on June 16, 2006

I know this is very sudden, but it has to be done, and I will not undo it. For reasons I can't fully explain, I am leaving wunderground, at least for a while. I may come back after hurricane season, but even that is doubtful. All I can say right now is that I am on here too much, and it is distracting me from family life, school, and my relationship with God. My mind has become stupified with weather, and I am just to stupidly weak to control my passions. I am addicted to the weather and I must change that. I am very sad to leave, but I must do it, for my sake, and for the sake of everybody around me. I might come back after the hurricane season, but even then I won't post on the blogs unless I have found a way to control my addiction. I am sorry all of you who were looking foward to having me on the blogs this hurricane season. I will pop in to read Dr. Master's blog once and a while, but I will not post myself. Please try to understand everyone. I simply must go, and God willing I will be back some day. Thank you all for a wonderful experience. I have never met people like you all, and it was a true pleasure to meet you and talk with you. I have found friends on here as well, and to those friends I thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with me, and helping me enter in to the blogging. I hope to see you all again sometime, it has been a blast. Happy blogging, and God bless you all!

Levi

Updated: 8:14 PM GMT on June 16, 2006

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Tropical Storm Alberto

By: Levi32, 3:56 PM GMT on June 11, 2006

At 11am EST TD 1 was upgraded to Tropical Storm Alberto based on ship reports and a recon report of 50-knot flight-level winds in an area of convection NE of the center. The storm remains very sheared, and the dry air to the west is also hindering the development of convection near the center. A well defined low level center has finally formed, and has moved NW overnight. The center has now stalled for the moment, deciding whether to go east or west.

The NHC is still forecasting the track across the northern Florida peninsula, and up the eastern seaboard. There is another possibility though, of the low level center escaping westward, while a the piece of energy with convection moves across Florida. Since Alberto is so weak, and has no deep convection near the center, it will be harder for the trough to pick it up, and it could escape into the western gulf. A handful of the minor models are hinting at this idea, but we should know which way Alberto will take by tonight.

For now I will continue to go with the eastward track, though I will move it farther south then yesterday's forecast. If Alberto goes east, then my forecast landfall will be just north of Tampa as a 45 knot (50 MPH) tropical storm. If Alberto goes west, then I will cross that bridge when I come to it. For now, all we can do is watch and wait. Images and links are below:

Zoomed-in Visible Loop

CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Colorado State Tropical Model Plots

SSD Tvorak Estimates

CIMSS Tvorak Estimates


NASA Satellite Page
(here is the help page for posting links, images and animations on this site)

Key West Radar Loop


Tampa Radar Loop

Click on these images for a loop of that image:








Updated: 4:46 PM GMT on June 11, 2006

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Tropical Depression 1

By: Levi32, 4:35 PM GMT on June 10, 2006

Update at 5:25pm Eastern Time: The depression still has not organized, and four vortices are now spread from north of Cuba to the western Caribbean. The system almost has a look of two seperate systems which are trying to split. This actually may happen, when one piece takes off northeast over Florida, and the other lags behind and moves west or northwest. There is one main vortex of each half of the depression; one northwest of Cuba, and one west of Mexico in the Caribbean embedded in moderate convection. The two vortices east of Cozumel are in the way. Until I see this mess all come together into one center, or if it splits into two systems, I cannot make a confident intensity or track forecast. The recon plane is still in there and we will see what the NHC says when it is done with its mission. Note: the recon found a pressure minimum of 1005mb near the southern vortex in the convection east of Mexico. This could be the beginning of a seperate system developing, since the other 1005mb minimum was much farther north where the original center was thought to be. The rest of my post is unchanged below:


The track is problematic this morning. Most of the models now take the storm into the great bend of Florida, or slightly south of that. I am not sure how strong the ridge will be to the east, or how much the trough will pull out. Right now I am sticking with my previous track between Pensacola and Panama, Florida. I do think a landfall is possible anywhere from Mobile, Alabama to Tampa, Florida.

The intensity of this storm is also going to be very hard to forecast. I think the NHC is on the right track calling for a 50 knot storm at landfall. I am just going to bump that up to 60 knots (70 MPH) for my prediction. This is a low confidence forecast and I would like to see this clear of Cuba and over the gulf waters for several hours before making a more solid intensity forecast. One big problem right now with how much this storm will intensify is the wind shear. I don't think there is as much shear out there as everyone thinks. For one the shear maps only show 25 knots at the most, and I think a good portion of that is the actual outflow of the depression. But just as before I want to see this clear of Cuba before making a determination on that point. Most are saying the shear is the reason all the convection is on the east side of the storm, but I think more of that is due to the dry air to the west. The dry air is slowly giving way, and by tonight I think at least some convection will form on the west or north sides of the system. I also do not believe the dry air will affect the intensity of this storm too much. I expect this depression will intensify into Tropical Storm Alberto after it clears Cuba, if the recon doesn't find it is Alberto already.

Well here we go everyone! Hurricane season is upon us. Links and images are below:

Zoomed-in Visible Loop

CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Colorado State Tropical Model Plots

SSD Tvorak Estimates

CIMSS Tvorak Estimates


NASA Satellite Page
(here is the help page for posting links, images and animations on this site)

Cuba Radars

Click on these images for a loop of that image:






Updated: 9:32 PM GMT on June 10, 2006

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Caribbean Disturbance

By: Levi32, 11:22 PM GMT on June 09, 2006

The disturbance in the Caribbean has not shown any more organization since this morning. Convection is dimishing slightly, but I expect that just like last night, the convection will come back with force during the duirnal max overnight. However the outflow has improved greatly in all quadrants, including the NW quadrant where it was inhibited this morning. The dry air has been slowly giving way in the southern gulf.

The reason this has not been labeled as a TD yet it this. The trough over the eastern U.S. is still connected to the disturbance, taking heat away from the system. You can see the thunderstorms streaming northeastward away from the disturbance. This is robbing the low of a lot of heat, and until the heat ceases to flow away from the storm, I don't think any significant development will occur. The water vapor loop does show the trough starting to be squeezed off by the lifting out of the low in New England, and the ridge nosing in from the east. By tomorrow the storm should have a better environment for strengthening.

I am guaranteeing a tropical depression by tomorrow evening at the latest, and I think we will see tropical storm Alberto moving into the gulf. I am also now going to make my first track forecast in the Gulf of Mexico. I think the storm will slowly move through the Yucatan Channel or over the extreme NE tip of the Yucatan Peninsula. The storm might meander for a while near that area, and then move north or northeast, eventually making landfall east of Pensacola, Florida. The storm will then move up the east coast, but that is another forecast for another time. Intensity at landfall is problematic at this time, and I will not make that forecast until this sytem is fully developed and on its way north towards the Yucatan Channel.

Images and links are below:

CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Colorado State Tropical Model Plots

Click on these images for a loop of that image:






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TD 1 in the Making

By: Levi32, 4:03 PM GMT on June 09, 2006

Update: After looking at visible satellite imagery and bouy observations, I am ready to call this sytem TD #1, even if the NHC hasn't yet. The NHC better do something soon, this system is developing fast. A well defined center has formed with strong convection surrounding it.

Well my first "official" prediction on a tropical system was right. The low has moved back over the Caribbean waters. This is very bad news, because instead of a weak low with little organization coming off the Yucatan into the gulf, we could have a TD or even Alberto coming into the gulf. The low is now organizing, with convection firing right over the center. There are hints of a northern band forming on microwave overpasses, and outflow channels are beginning to develop. If this trend continues there is a good chance we will have TD 1 tonight. The NHC is sending out a plane to investigate the system tomorrow morning.

The majority of the tropical models are now moving this system north through the Yucatan Channel. A couple still insist on the western track into the Bay of Campeche but as I stated yesterday I am disregarding that solution entirely. The GFS takes it north towards the Florida panhandle, but the NAM is still sticking with the NW track over the Yucatan and into the western gulf, and then it curves it towards New Orleans. There is a small possibility of that happening, but I do not think so. I am sticking with the track through the Yucatan Channel.

The GFS initialized 500mb map shows the upper trough splitting the ridge through Cuba. In 24 hours you see the western ridge noses its way in and pushes that trough east. In 36 hours the trough gets cut off, and a weak ridge extends from the Caribbean to Texas north of the disturbance. By 48 hours for some reason the GFS breaks down the ridge, maybe because of a weak shorwave moving across Missouri and Indiana. The GFS further breaks down the ridge until the disturbance moves into the Florida panhandle. The position and strength of this ridge will be what determines the track of this storm. It is a tough forecast right now, and I will refrain from making a forecast on the track in the gulf until the system makes it to the Yucatan Channel and by that time it may be a more developed system for the models to forecast.

For today, there is a good chance of TD 1 forming by tonight, and maybe even Tropical storm Alberto by tomorrow. Here we go, this is our first test of the season everyone, get good practice on it. Images and links are below:

CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Colorado State Tropical Model Plots

Click on these images for a loop of that image:






Updated: 11:21 PM GMT on June 09, 2006

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Invest 90L

By: Levi32, 3:11 AM GMT on June 09, 2006

There has been little additional organization of the system today. Convection continues to flare over the entire western Caribbean and surrounding land masses. A broad low has formed over Belize according to the NHC. The models continue to be divided on the track of this disturbance. I am taking my first major forecasting step here for this system and saying that I am COMPLETELY disregarding the track due west into the southern Bay of Campeche. I am leaning towards the latest GFDL solution, which take the low back over the west Caribbean and moves it north past the northeastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula. The reason for this is because the upper feature in the Gulf of Mexico isn't going away, and the ridge will not build in solidly until 4 days from now. In the images I have posted below, look at the water vapor loop. You will see the dry air is still sinking southward in the Bay of Campeche. I just can't imagine looking at the air flow that the disturbance will move westward into that area. Just look at the loop and you will see that it makes more sense that the disturbance would move north or NNW. Also the latest surface analysis has a low extension over Honduras. This could be the beginnings of the low reforming back over the Caribbean. I am now confident that a new low will form closer to the main area of convection in the western Caribbean. The trough split will be complete tomorrow and the upper feature will move over the surface low. Within three days this disturbance should be in the Gulf of Mexico, at which point we will start talking about landfall possibilities. Right now I am fairly confident that if this makes it to the gulf, then we will be looking at TD 1. Images and links are below:

CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Click on these images for a loop of that image:






Updated: 4:05 AM GMT on June 09, 2006

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Invest 90L....Alberto?

By: Levi32, 4:08 PM GMT on June 08, 2006

Invest 90L is has formed in the western Caribbean. This is not a closed low yet, but convection is increasing in area coverage and intensity. The models are spread between this system moving west across the Yucatan Peninsula into the Bay of Campeche and moving NNW through the gap between Mexico and Cuba and into the Gulf of Mexico. Right now I am leaning towards the latter of those two solutions. There is a cut off upper trough in the central gulf, which I think will have some pull on this system. The low will be naturally drawn to it, because if the low level circulation come underneath the upper feature, the chances of development will be greatly increased. This upper feature has also split the ridges, which should allow some movement north, before any westward turn begins. The GFS has this upper feature moving into the extreme NW Caribbean in 24 hours with an 850 vort max under it. But the surface low is displaced in the extreme SW Caribbean, which eventually moves due west. The NAM is similar to this solution as well. I believe there will be more northern movement then any of the models exept the CMC indicate. The reason is I think the models are seeing the development of the TD in the eastern Pacific and are having trouble deciding if the TD and the Caribbean disturbance are two seperate systems. My answer is yes, I think they will be. But the models are trying to phase the two, pulling the Caribbean system south and west, despite the weakness in the ridge to the north. I don't think this will happen. I think a new low center will form further north near the current blob of convection, and the upper feature in the gulf will come down to meet it like the GFS indicates in 24 hours. I then expect the disturbance to turn NNW, and eventually NW possibly over the Yucatan as the ridge from the east builds back in. Wind shear is a problem, but right now I think the only shear will be caused by the gulf upper feature as it moves south towards the disturbance. The disturbance will have to bust through the last remains of the sub-tropical jet, but then there is little to no shear forecasted for the rest of the Gulf of Mexico. I believe this disturbance will become TD 1. It may happen in the Caribbean, but it may wait until it is in the gulf to develop. Once in the gulf and under the upper feature, I think this will have a good chance to develop into Tropical Storm Alberto.

We will see what happens. Images and links regarding Invest 90L are below:


CIMSS Satellite Winds

SSD Formation Probability and other Maps

Tropical Genesis Forecast Models


NCEP Atlantic Models

Tropical Model Plots

Click on these images for a loop of that image:







Updated: 4:56 PM GMT on June 08, 2006

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Desktop Weather Center Instructions

By: Levi32, 11:35 PM GMT on June 06, 2006

I have decided to write a new set of much simpler instructions on how to place a web item on your desktop. My last set of instructions was way too complicated and lengthly in my opinion. If you desire more detailed instructions, or exactly what this feature does, please reffer to my previous blog entry.

Click "start", "control panel", and then "display". In the "desktop" tab, click "customize desktop". In the "web" tab, click "new", and copy the url of your desired webpage into the space provided. Follow the prompts, and a small window will appear on your desktop. The webpage is inside this window, which you can rezize just like a browser window.

If you hold your mouse just above the top of the window, a tool bar will appear. On the right there are buttons for expanding or full-screening the window, or exiting it from your desktop. On the left you will see a drop-down menu, from which you can access item options, or synchronize (update) the webpage.

Some satellite and radar loops update all by themselves, but for those that don't, you can set a schedule for them to automatically synchronize for a specific time interval. Simply select "properties" from the drop-down menu, and under the "schedule" tab, click "new" and set the time of day you wish the item to update. After the schedule is set up, you can get more advanced schedule options by selecting the schedule from the list and clicking "edit". This will allow you to have your webpage update for a specific time interval. If you do not wish to have a schedule for updating, then just select "sychronize" from the desktop item's drop-down menu.

You can place as many web items on your desktop as you please, but be aware that too many can freeze your computer. Also if you full-screen a loop or webpage, when you click or drag your mouse on the desktop, it will act exactly as if you were doing it in the actual webpage. Therefore you will not have access to the right-click desktop menu, and a few other things your mouse does on your desktop. You can still move your icons anywhere you like on the desktop.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful feature!

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Desktop Weather Center Instructions

By: Levi32, 4:57 AM GMT on June 05, 2006

I have decided to write a new set of much simpler instructions on how to place a web item on your desktop. My last set of instructions was way too complicated and lengthly in my opinion. If you desire more detailed instructions, or exactly what this feature does, please reffer to my previous blog entry.

Click "start", "control panel", and then "display". In the "desktop" tab, click "customize desktop". In the "web" tab, click "new", and copy the url of your desired webpage into the space provided. Follow the prompts, and a small window will appear on your desktop. The webpage is inside this window, which you can rezize just like a browser window.

If you hold your mouse just above the top of the window, a tool bar will appear. On the right there are buttons for expanding or full-screening the window, or exiting it from your desktop. On the left you will see a drop-down menu, from which you can access item options, or synchronize (update) the webpage.

Some satellite and radar loops update all by themselves, but for those that don't, you can set a schedule for them to automatically synchronize for a specific time interval. Simply select "properties" from the drop-down menu, and under the "schedule" tab, click "new" and set the time of day you wish the item to update. After the schedule is set up, you can get more advanced schedule options by selecting the schedule from the list and clicking "edit". This will allow you to have your webpage update for a specific time interval. If you do not wish to have a schedule for updating, then just select "sychronize" from the desktop item's drop-down menu.

You can place as many web items on your desktop as you please, but be aware that too many can freeze your computer. Also if you full-screen a loop or webpage, when you click or drag your mouse on the desktop, it will act exactly as if you were doing it in the actual webpage. Therefore you will not have access to the right-click desktop menu, and a few other things your mouse does on your desktop. You can still move your icons anywhere you like on the desktop.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful feature!

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Desktop Weather Center

By: Levi32, 2:16 AM GMT on June 02, 2006

I have wanted to do this for a long time but have never remembered about it. Some of you may already know about this feature on your computer, but for those of you who don't, here are instructions on how to create a weather center on your very own computer's desktop!

Here’s how it works. Information can be copied from the internet and put on your desktop. These are called “active desktop items”. For example, if you copy the location of a satellite loop in “gif” format, you can place that loop on your desktop. The loop will sit as a little window, which can be easily resized just like any browser window. When you synchronize the item, it updates the loop. You can set the loop to update to a schedule, so the loop is always current! For any loop in “gif” format, just the loop is displayed, which is preferable, but desktop items are not limited to just “gif” loops. You can put almost any webpage on your desktop that you please. You can even put loops from the SSD site on there for example, which are java loops. The webpage is then basically put on your desktop in a little window exactly the way it would be in your web browser. This is a little more of a hassle since there is the rest of the page to deal with besides the actual sat loop. If you click on a link in the page, that link opens in a browser window.

So let’s walk through how to put a web page, loop or image on your desktop and have it update itself automatically. My computer is a Windows XP Home Edition, but if you have Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher, or Windows 2000 and higher, then your computer should have this feature.

1. Go to the webpage or the page with the loop or image that you wish to put on your desktop. If it is a loop other than gif format, or if you want to put the whole webpage on your desktop, then copy the url in the address bar. If you want to put an image or a gif loop on your desktop, then copy the location of the loop or image, like you would do to put it on a blog.

2. Click “start”, “control panel”, and then “display”. Select the “desktop” tab, click the button “customize desktop”, and then select the tab “web”.

3. You will then see a list of any active desktop items that you may have, which should be empty unless the computer automatically put something there that needs to be there. Click “new,” and the computer should attempt to connect to the website. If it connects successfully, a dialog box will come up asking for the location of the item you want to put on your desktop. Paste the url which you copied into the bar provided, and then click ok. Follow the following prompts, and when you are done, you should see your url appear in the list of active desktop items. Check the box next to that url, and click “apply”. A small window should appear on your desktop with the loop, image, or webpage in it. Hold your mouse just above the window and a bar will appear with a drop down list on the left with options. On the right you can either expand, full-screen, or exit the window. You can click and drag on the borders of the window to size it any way you want, exactly like a browser window. You can add as many of these desktop items as you desire, but if you put a ton on there, the chances of your computer freezing when you load your desktop will be greatly increased.

4. If you wish the desktop item to update automatically, you can either repeat step 2 to go to the list of active desktop items, or click “properties” from the drop-down menu on your desktop item. If you repeat step 2, select the item which you wish to change, and then click “properties”. Select the option “use the following schedule(s)”, and then below the list of existing schedules, click “add”. You can then choose a name for your schedule, and the time of day at which the desktop item will update. Click apply. When you first make the schedule you are only able to make an update time for once a day, but more detailed options are available if you select the schedule you want to change, and click “edit”. You can then set which desktop items that you want to use that particular schedule, and exactly how often you want them to update. You can add as many schedules as you want.

I hope you all enjoy this wonderful feature. You can make a whole weather center customized for you all on your desktop! It sure beats going to each individual radar or sat loop whenever you want to see it lol! Enjoy!

Updated: 6:44 PM GMT on June 02, 2006

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About Levi32

Levi Cowan has been tracking tropical systems since 2002, and is currently working on his bachelor's degree in physics at UAF.

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MesoWest NERRS METEOROLOGICAL SITE AT KAC AK US
Fritz Creek, AK
Elevation: 32 ft
Temperature: 38.0 °F
Dew Point: 33.0 °F
Humidity: 82%
Wind: 19.0 mph from the ENE
Wind Gust: 24.0 mph
Updated: 12:30 AM AKST on December 18, 2014
Overlooking Peterson Bay
Homer, AK
Elevation: 27 ft
Temperature: -39.3 °F
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Wind: Calm
Wind Gust: 0.0 mph
Updated: 1:39 PM AKST on December 10, 2014
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Homer, AK
Elevation: 854 ft
Temperature: 34.0 °F
Dew Point: 26.0 °F
Humidity: 73%
Wind: 7.0 mph from the NNW
Wind Gust: 12.0 mph
Updated: 11:54 PM AKST on December 17, 2014

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