JohnnyParker's Blog

Atlantic quiet, Eastern Pacific dead, and a frost across parts of the South

By: JohnnyParker, 10:28 AM GMT on October 31, 2011

The current temperature is 36 and it feels like 36. Highs will continue to range between 63 and 78 with lows between 36 and 50. There is a 30% chance of a few showers on Thursday. A frost is possible tonight across parts of North Mississippi and other parts of the South as well. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, it is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it is dead with no development predicted over the next couple of days. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 40 and it feels like 40. Todays high is 68 with a low of 36. Tuesdays high is 71. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic and Eastern Pacific quiet, cool weather settles into the South

By: JohnnyParker, 7:50 PM GMT on October 30, 2011

The current temperature is 61 and it feels like 61. Highs will continue to range between 64 and 76 with lows between 35 and 51. No rain until Thursday and Friday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, it is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, same thing with no development predicted over the next couple of days. The Northeast got hammered this weekend by a very unusual storm system that produced over 10 inches of snow in most places. Some areas got over 20 to 30 inches of snow. On average, the Northeast gets less than 1 inch of snowfall in the month of October. These records got destroyed by this weekend's winter storm. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 63 and it feels like 63. Tonights low is 36. Mondays high is 70 with a low of 35. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Freeze Warning in effect for most of North Mississippi

By: JohnnyParker, 8:33 PM GMT on October 29, 2011

The Freeze Watch has been upgraded to a Freeze Warning until 10am Sunday across most of North Mississippi. Tonights low will be between 33 and 32. I'll have another post tomorrow.

Updated: 8:37 PM GMT on October 29, 2011

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My preliminary forecast for the winter and a sneak peak of spring

By: JohnnyParker, 4:33 PM GMT on October 29, 2011

La Nina is strengthening and should continue to strengthen through the winter. Here is what I believe will happen this winter: In December, parts of the South may see another white christmas. In January, I believe that the South will be in for some ice/snow storms. Temperatures for both December and January should be below average across the Southeast. Going into February and on into March, we may see another active severe weather season across the South. This will include heavy rain events, too. Now, a typical La Nina brings a mild and dry winter to the South and then an active severe weather season in the spring. All this will depend on two things: how strong this La Nina will get and if the Greenland Block occurs. If these two things happen, then we should have snow and more cold air this winter across the South. This is only my opinion and what I believe we will see this winter. I'll have another outlook at some point in November or at the first of December.

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Rina gone, cooler weather across the South

By: JohnnyParker, 12:53 PM GMT on October 29, 2011

The current temperature is 33 and it feels like 33. A Frost Advisory remains in effect until 10am Saturday and a Freeze Watch remains in effect until 10am Sunday. Highs will continue to range between 66 and 72 with lows between 32 and 49. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is showers and thunderstorms over the southwestern Caribbean Sea are associated with a broad area of low pressure. There are no signs of organization at this time, and development, if any, should be slow to occur. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The second is showers and thunderstorms over the Eastern Atlantic about 1050 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands are associated with a surface trough of low pressure interacting with a mid-level low. This system has become a little better organized this morning, and additional slow development is possible during the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. The Eastern Pacific remains inactive. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 34 and it feels like 34. Todays high is 64 with a low of 32. Sundays high is 66. Hope yall are having a fantastic Saturday and I'll be back with another post later today. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Frost/Freeze likely tonight and Saturday night across parts of the South

By: JohnnyParker, 9:47 PM GMT on October 28, 2011

A frost and/or freeze is becoming likely across parts of the South tonight and Saturday night. For this reason, the National Weather Service in Memphis has issued a Frost Advisory and Freeze Watches/Warnings across most of North Mississippi. The Frost Advisory is in effect until 10am Saturday and the Freeze Watch is in effect until 10am Sunday. The Freeze Watch could be upgraded to a Freeze Warning at some point on Saturday. I'll have a full post tomorrow.

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Rina weakens to a tropical storm, rain across the South today

By: JohnnyParker, 10:50 AM GMT on October 28, 2011

The current temperature is 51 and it feels like 51. Highs will continue to range between 59 and 73 with lows between 33 and 44. There is an 80% chance of am rain today across North Mississippi. A frost and/or freeze is possible tonight with a light freeze expected on Saturday night into Sunday morning. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring three areas. First is Tropical Storm Rina. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 998mbars. Latitude is 21.1 degrees North and longitude is 87.0 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 5mph. A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect from Punta Allen to San Felipe, Mexico. By 1pm today, winds will be down to 45mph. The second is showers and thunderstorms over the West-Central Caribbean Sea are associated with a broad area of low pressure. Development, if any, should be slow to occur as it drifts northwestward. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The third is a low pressure system over the Eastern Atlantic about 850 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands is producing a small area of showers and thunderstorms. Upper-level winds are expected to be marginally conducive for development over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves west-northwestward at 5 to 10mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains extremely quiet. I believe that the 2011 Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season is over. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 48, but it feels like 43 with heavy rain. Todays high is 58 and a low of 34 with a 70% chance of am rain. Saturdays high is 66. Hope yall are having a great Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Rina weakens to a category 1, Eastern Pacific remains quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:51 AM GMT on October 27, 2011

The current temperature is 53 and it feels like 53. Highs will continue to range between 64 and 71 with lows between 34 and 48. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms today and a 70% chance of light rain on Friday morning. A frost and/or freeze will be possible on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights as temperatures will drop to the mid to low 30s. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we continue to monitor two areas. The first is Hurricane Rina. Winds are at 75mph with a pressure of 988mbars. Latitude is 18.8 degrees North and longitude is 86.9 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 6mph. A Hurricane Warning is still in effect from north of Punta Gruesa to San Felipe. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Chetumal to Punta Gruesa and from west of San Felipe to Progreso. Main threats from Rina will be heavy rains, flash flooding, storm surge, high wind, high waves, rough seas, mudslides, and beach erosion. By 1pm or earlier, winds will be down to 70mph. The second is a surface trough of low pressure is producing disorganized cloudiness and showers over the west-central Caribbean Sea. Development of this system is not likely for the next few days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a near 0% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 56 and it feels like 56. Todays high is 62 with a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms. Tonights low is 46 with a 70% chance of showers. Fridays high is 63 with a 70% chance of am light rain. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Rina to become a category 3 later today, Eastern Pacific remains quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:52 AM GMT on October 26, 2011

The current temperature is 48 and it feels like 48. Highs will continue to range between 61 and 82 with lows between 35 and 55. There is a 50% chance of pm showers tomorrow and a 30% chance of am showers on Friday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are still monitoring two areas. The first is Hurricane Rina. Winds are at 110mph with a pressure of 967mbars. Latitude is 17.5 degrees North and longitude is 85.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 5mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from Belize City northward and then from Roatan to Guanaja in Honduras. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Chetumal to Punta Gruesa in the Yucatan Peninsula. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from north of Punta Gruesa to Cancun, Mexico. Main threats will be heavy rain, flash flooding, mudslides, high winds, storm surge, beach erosion, high waves, and rough seas. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become a 115mph category 3 major hurricane. The second is showers and thunderstorms associated with a surface trough over the south-central Caribbean Sea have continued to decrease in intensity and organization. Development of this system, if any, should be slow to occur as it moves generally westward at 15mph over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 51 and it feels like 51. Todays high is 79 with a low of 56. Thursdays high is 62 with a 50% chance of pm showers. Today is Severe Weather Awareness Day across the state of Mississippi. At 9:15 this morning, the National Weather Service will conduct a tornado Drill. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Rina becomes a category 2 hurricane, could become a category 3

By: JohnnyParker, 10:48 AM GMT on October 25, 2011

The current temperature is 43 and it feels like 43. A Dense Fog Advisory is in effect until 10am this morning. Highs will continue to range between 56 and 82 with lows between 34 and 54. There is a 50% chance of showers on Thursday and a 40% chance of showers on Friday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are watching two areas. The first is Hurricane Rina, which is now a category 2 storm. Winds are at 100mph with a pressure of 975mbars. Latitude is 17.3 degrees North and longitude is 83.6 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 3mph. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for the Yucatan Peninsula from north of Punta Gruesa to Cancun. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the Yucatan Peninsula from Chetumal to Punta Gruesa. Main threats will be localized flash flooding and chance of winds of tropical storm or hurricane force, especially eastern Yucatan. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be 105mph. I believe that Rina has a good chance at becoming a category 3 or possibly even a category 4 storm. The latest projected path takes it near the Yucatan Peninsula and turns it toward Cuba. The second is an area of low pressure just to the north of Curacao is producing scattered showers and thunderstorms. Although this system has not become significantly better organized over the past few hours, upper-level winds are expected to become more conducive for development as the disturbance moves over the south-central Caribbean Sea. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 40% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves west-northwestward at 15 to 20mph. Some locally heavy rains are possible over Aruba, Curacao, Bonaire, the northwestern coast of Venezuela, and the northeastern coast of Colombia today. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 45 and it feels like 45. A Dense Fog Advisory is in effect until 10am this morning. Todays high is 80 with a low of 49. Tomorrows high is 79. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm Rina in the Western Caribbean Sea

By: JohnnyParker, 10:38 AM GMT on October 24, 2011

The current temperature is 49 and it feels like 49. A Dense Fog Advisory is in effect until 9am this morning. Highs will continue to range between 63 and 83 with lows between 35 and 56. There is a 40% chance of scattered thunderstorms on Thursday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are watching two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Rina. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 16.7 degrees North and longitude is 82.3 degrees West. Movement is North-Northwest at 6mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from Punta Castilla eastward to the Nicaragua border. Main threats will be localized flash flooding and a chance for winds of tropical storm force. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be at 45mph. The second is a broad low pressure area nearing the Windward Islands has limited shower activity at this time. Upper-level winds are only marginally favorable and development, if any, of this disturbance will be slow to occur. However, the low could produce brief periods of locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds in the Windward Islands later today and tonight. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves west-northwestward at about 10mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. The Eastern Pacific remains quiet. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 50 and it feels like 50. Todays high is 78 with a low of 47. Tomorrows high is 82. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Depression Eighteen forms

By: JohnnyParker, 9:23 PM GMT on October 23, 2011

Tropical Depression #18 has formed over the Western Caribbean Sea. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 15.9 degrees North and longitude is 81.9 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 12mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from Punta Castilla eastward to the Nicaragua Border. By 1am Monday morning, it will become 40mph Tropical Storm Rina. I'll have a full post tomorrow morning.

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Two areas to watch in Atlantic and Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 2:41 PM GMT on October 23, 2011

The current temperature is 51 and it feels like 51. Highs will continue to range between 59 and 83 with lows between 36 and 53. There is a 30% chance of pm showers today across North MS. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is showers and thunderstorms associated with an area of low pressure centered about 150 miles east-southeast of the Nicaragua and Honduras border have changed little in organization early this morning. Environmental conditions are forecast to become a little more conducive for development, and a tropical depression could form during the next day or so. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly northward and then northwestward. Regardless of development, locally heavy rains and gusty winds could affect portions of Honduras and northeastern Nicaragua through Monday. The second is a broad low pressure area continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms several hundred miles east of the southern Windward Islands. Development, if any, of this disturbance is likely to be slow to occur. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly northwestward and then west-northwestward. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temeperature is 53 and it feels like 53. Todays high is 71 and a low of 49. Tomorrows high is 79. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Watching two areas in the Atlantic, severe weather possible next week?

By: JohnnyParker, 5:47 PM GMT on October 22, 2011

The current temperature is 64 and it feels like 64. Highs will continue to range between 59 and 83 with lows between 38 and 52. There is a 40% chance of scattered thunderstorms next Thursday. A potent cold front will push through late next week and will cause thunderstorms. This front will usher in some more cold air. There is reason to believe that this front could produce severe weather since we will be going from the low 70s on Thursday down to the high 50s on Friday. At this time, I do not believe that this will be a significant severe weather outbreak. Just my opinion going into next week. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for potential development. The first is cloudiness and thunderstorms associated with a nearly stationary area of low pressure in the southwestern Caribbean Sea near San Andres Island have not become any better organized since yesterday. Although surface pressures have continued to fall in the area, environmental conditions appear to be a little bit less favorable for a tropical depression to form during the next day or two. However, the National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The second is a broad area of low pressure located several hundred miles east of the southern Windward Islands is producing disorganized cloudiness and thunderstorms. This activity has been gradually decreasing since yesterday, and development, if any, will be slow to occur. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly toward the west-northwest. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. At the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS, the current temperature is 66 and it feels like 66. Todays high is 70 with a low of 41. Sundays high is 74. Hope yall are having a great Saturday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Freeze Warning in effect for parts of North MS

By: JohnnyParker, 8:57 PM GMT on October 21, 2011

A Freeze Warning has been issued until 9am Saturday morning. I'll have another post tomorrow.

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Another night of cold temperatures across the South and watching the Atlantic

By: JohnnyParker, 10:41 AM GMT on October 21, 2011

The current temperature is 34 and it feels like 34. A frost advisory remains in effect until 9am this morning. Highs will continue to range between 67 and 81 with lows between 35 and 52. A scattered frost is also possible tonight across parts of the South. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms on Sunday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is a broad area of low pressure is located over the southwestern caribbean sea about 150 miles east-southeast of the Honduras-Nicaragua border. Althought this large disturbance is showing signs of organization, any further development should be slow to occur due to only marginally favorable upper-level winds and proximity to dry air for the next couple of days. However, environmental conditions are expected to become more conducive for development after a few days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it drifts southward. The second is an area of disturbed weather located about 1000 miles east of the Windward Islands has diminished, and upper-level winds are becoming less favorable for development. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a near 0% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly northward or northwestward. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. The current temperature at the Regional Rehab Center in Tupelo, MS is 36 and it feels like 36. Todays high is 66 with a low of 34. Hope yall are having a fantastic Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Scattered frost tonight across the South, Atlantic and Eastern Pacific remain quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:28 AM GMT on October 20, 2011

The current temperature is 40, but it feels like 36. Highs will continue to range between 64 and 81 with lows between 34 and 54. Winds will be out of the West at 10 to 20mph today. There will be a scattered frost tonight across parts of the South. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. However, some long-range computer models show a tropical storm forming south of Mexico and heading up toward Baja California. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic and Eastern Pacific quiet, cold weather settles in across the South

By: JohnnyParker, 10:30 AM GMT on October 19, 2011

The current temperature is 48, but it feels like 44. Highs will continue to range between 61 and 81 with lows between 35 and 50. Winds will be out of the West-Northwest at 15 to 25mph today and out of the West at 15 to 25mph tomorrow. A frost and/or freeze will be possible tonight, Thursday night, and Friday night across parts of the South. I believe that we may get a big frost on either Thursday or Friday night. Lows during this time will range between 35 and 36. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, same thing with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Still watching the system in the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:41 AM GMT on October 18, 2011

The current temperature is 58 and it feels like 58. Highs will continue to range between 60 and 79 with lows between 35 and 47. There is a 40% chance of pm thunderstorms today. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. A frost and/or freeze remains possible on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights. The lows during the time will range between 35 and 36. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are still watching one area for possible development. The first is a broad area of low pressure centered just north of the Yucatan Peninsula is producing a large cluster of showers and thunderstorms and winds to tropical storm force over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. However, recent satellite and surface data indicate that the low's center is located several hundred miles west of the heaviest showers and strongest winds, and the circulation is becoming elongated north-northeastward over the central Gulf of Mexico. The potential for this system to develop appears to be decreasing, and the National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it begins to move north-northeastward at 10 to 15mph later today. Regardless of development, this system is expected to produce locally heavy rainfall, gusty winds, and possible severe weather over the Florida Keys, the Florida Peninsula, southern Georgia, and coastal sections of the Carolinas over the next day or so. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Irwin dissipates, and still monitoring the western caribbean for development

By: JohnnyParker, 10:44 AM GMT on October 17, 2011

The current temperature is 52 and it feels like 52. Highs will continue to range between 61 and 90 with lows between 36 and 57. There is a 50% chance of scattered thunderstorms for Tuesday. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. A frost and/or freeze is still possible Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights. The lows for these three nights will be between 36 and 37. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is surface observations indicate the large low pressure system located near the northeastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula is gradually becoming better defined. Showers and thunderstorms have also increased and become better organized near the surface center during the past several hours. Additionally, winds to near tropical storm force are occurring in the Yucatan channel, over the extreme southeastern Gulf of Mexico, and over the western straits of Florida. Upper-level winds are expected to be marginally conducive for development during the next day or so before becoming unfavorable after that. Although this large disturbance is interacting with the yucatan peninsula, some gradual development is still possible as the low moves toward the north or northwest at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Regardless of development, locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds are expected over the Yucatan Peninsula, Western Cuba, the Florida Keys, and south Florida during the next couple of days. An Air Force reserve reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the low this afternoon, if necessary. The second is a small low pressure system located about 1400 miles east of the Windward Islands continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Upper-level winds are gradually becoming less conducive for development, and the National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Irwin has finally dissipated and no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Watching Atlantic for development, Irwin weakens to a Tropical Depression

By: JohnnyParker, 8:17 PM GMT on October 16, 2011

The current temperature is 85, but it feels like 83. Highs will continue to range between 61 and 89 with lows between 36 and 58. There is a 30% chance of a few showers Tuesday. A frost and/or freeze will be possible Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights across Northern Mississippi and other parts of the South. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is surface observations indicate that the center of the large area of low pressure near the Yucatan Peninsula is not well defined but may be reforming just to the east of Cozumel. The low continues to produce winds near tropical storm force in the vicinity of the Yucatan Channel and the Western Straits of Florida. Although this system is likely to interact with the land mass of the Yucatan Peninsula during the next day or so, some gradual development is possible as the low moves slowly northwestward. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 50% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Regardless of development, locally heavy rainfall is expected to continue over the Yucatan Peninsula and Western Cuba during the next couple of days. The second is an area of low pressure located about 1500 miles east of the Windward Islands continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Upper-level winds are expected to become less favorable for development of this system during the next couple of days as the low moves westward at 10 to 15mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one system. The first is Tropical Depression Irwin. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 14.1 degrees North and longitude is 107.8 degrees West. Movement is Southwest at 5mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Two areas to watch in Atlantic, Irwin still out there

By: JohnnyParker, 3:24 PM GMT on October 15, 2011

The current temperature is 62 and it feels like 62. Highs will continue to range between 62 and 87 with lows between 36 and 59. Looking foreward to next week, the south could see the first frost and/or freeze as colder air moves in behind a cold front Tuesday into Tuesday night. With this cold front pushing through, we could see some strong to severe storms Tuesday through Tuesday night. As of now, I do not believe that this will be a significant or widespread severe weather outbreak. The main threats will be large hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is a broad low pressure system centered just east of Belize is producing disorganized cloudiness and thunderstorms across a large portion of the northwestern Caribbean Sea and adjacent land areas. Although surface pressures are not significantly falling, some development is possible before the center moves over the Yucatan Peninsula by late Sunday. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Locally heavy rains will likely continue over portions of Central America, the Yucatan Peninsula, Cuba, Jamaica, and the Cayman Islands during the next couple of days, resulting in life-threatening flash floods and mudslides. The second is shower and thunderstorm activity associated with an area of low pressure located about 675 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands is showing some signs of organization. Some development is possible during the next day or so before upper-level winds become less favorable for tropical cyclone formation. The National Hurricane Center is giving this disturbance a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at about 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are still monitoring two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Irwin. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 16.5 degrees North and longitude is 106.6 degrees West. Movement is South at 7mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, it will again become a 35mph tropical depression. The second is a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms along the coast of Central America extending westward to southeastern Mexico is associated with a nearly stationary trough of low pressure. Although this system is not expected to become a tropical cyclone, torrential rains should continue over portions of the pacific coast of southeastern Mexico and Central America during the next couple of days, resulting in life-threatening flash floods and mudslides. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 0% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Saturday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic seeing some activity, Irwin still hanging on

By: JohnnyParker, 10:46 AM GMT on October 14, 2011

The current temperature is 52 and it feels like 52. Highs will continue to range between 69 and 87 with lows between 37 and 60. There is a 40% chance of scattered thunderstorms next Tuesday. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is a weak surface low located about 450 miles west-southwest of Bermuda is producing a limited area of showers and thunderstorms. Upper-level winds are becoming less conducive for development before the low merges with a frontal system during the next day or so. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves toward the northeast at 15 to 20mph. The second is disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the northwestern Caribbean Sea are associated with a broad low pressure area. Some slow development of this system is possible as it drifts to the northwest. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Locally heavy rains will likely continue over a large portion of Central America, Cuba, and adjacent islands during the next couple of days, resulting in life-threatening flash floods and mudslides. I believe that this system as a decent chance of becoming a tropical depression or storm over the next couple of days. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are also monitoring two systems. The first is Tropical Storm Irwin. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 18.9 degrees North and longitude is 106.8 degrees West. Movement is South-Southeast at 2mph. The second is an elongated trough of low pressure extends just off the coast of southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador and is producing a disorganized area of showers and thunderstorms. This system is expected to move little during the next couple of days, and some slow development is possible if the trough axis remains over water. Regardless of development, locally heavy rains are likely near portions of the pacific coasts of southeastern Mexico and Central America. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a fantastic Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic still quiet, Hurricane Jova and T.D. Twelve-E dissipate

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on October 13, 2011

The current temperature is 63 and it feels like 63. Highs will continue to range between 69 and 87 with lows between 42 and 58. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms today. Now, for your tropical update. The Atlantic is still quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one system. Jova and Tropical Depression Twelve-E have dissipated. The first is Tropical Depression Irwin. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 18.3 degrees North and longitude is 107.7 degrees West. Movement is Northeast at 13mph. Irwin is not a threat to land. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Quiet in Atlantic, Eastern Pacific active

By: JohnnyParker, 10:43 AM GMT on October 12, 2011

The current temperature is 61 and it feels like 61. Highs will continue to range between 70 and 86 with lows between 41 and 59. There is a 60% chance of scattered thunderstorms tonight and a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms tomorrow. A few storms could be strong to severe tonight with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. Now, for your tropical update. The Atlantic remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring three systems. The first is Hurricane Jova, which has made landfall in Mexico. Winds are at 85mph with a pressure of 981mbars. Latitude is 19.9 degrees North and longitude is 105.1 degrees West. Movement is North at 9mph. A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect from Lazaro Cardenas northward to Punta San Telmo and from Cabo Corrientes northward to El Roblito, Mexico. A Hurricane Warning also remains in effect from Punta San Telmo northward to El Roblito, Mexico. Main threats will continue to be heavy rain, flash flooding, mudslides, wind, high waves/rough surf, rip currents, and beach erosion. By 1pm today or earlier, Jova will be a 65mph tropical storm. The second is Tropical Storm Irwin. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 15.2 degrees North and longitude is 112.3 degrees West. Movement is East-Northeast at 10mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be back down to 40mph. The third is Tropical Depression Twelve-E. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 14.7 degrees North and longitude is 93.6 degrees West. Movement is North at 5mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Barra de Tonala southeastwards to the Mexico-Guatemala Border. By 1pm today or earlier, it will be a 40mph Tropical Storm. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic remains quiet, Irwin weakens to a T.D., Hurricane Jova nearing landfall

By: JohnnyParker, 10:49 AM GMT on October 11, 2011

The current temperature is 63 and it feels like 63. Highs will continue to range between 76 and 84 with lows between 44 and 58. There is a slight chance of storms Wednesday into Wednesday night across North Mississippi. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring 3 areas. The first is Tropical Depression Irwin. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 15.2 degrees North and longitude is 115.5 degrees West. Movement is East at 8mph. Irwin is likely to maintain Tropical Depression status over the next couple of days as it heads toward Mexico. The second is Hurricane Jova. Winds are at 115mph with a pressure of 963mbars. Latitude is 17.5 degrees North and longitude is 105.9 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 6mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will decrease to 110mph. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from Punta San Telmo northward to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Lazaro Cardenas northward to Punta San Telmo and from Cabo Corrientes northward to El Roblito. Main threats will be heavy rain, flash flooding, mudslides, coastal storm surge/waves, high winds, rip currents, beach erosion, and rough seas. Jova is expected to make landfall later today in Mexico. The third is shower and thunderstorm activity associated with a low pressure system located about 300 miles south of the gulf of Tehuantepec has changed little and remains separated from the center of circulation. Upper-level winds, however, could become a little more conducive for development over the next couple of days as the low moves generally northward at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 50% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Interests along the pacific coasts of southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua should monitor the progress of this disturbance. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

Updated: 10:51 AM GMT on October 11, 2011

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Atlantic quiet, Tropical Storm Irwin and Hurricane Jova in Eastern Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 7:23 PM GMT on October 10, 2011

The current temperature is 78, but it feels like 80. Highs will continue to range between 78 and 84 with lows between 44 and 58. There is a slight chance of rain Wednesday into Wednesday night. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Philippe is gone and no development is predicted over the next couple of days. However, computer forecast models continue to show something trying to organize over the Western Caribbean going toward the middle of this month. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring 3 areas. The first is Hurricane Jova. Winds are at 125mph with a pressure of 957mbars. Latitude is 16.5 degrees North and longitude is 106.4 degrees West. Movement is East-Northeast at 6mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Lazaro Cardenas northward to Punta San Telmo, Mexico. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from Punta San Telmo northward to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico. Main threats will be heavy rain, flash flooding, mudslides, high waves, rough seas, beach erosion, rip currents, and high winds. By 7am Tuesday morning or earlier, it will be a 135mph category 4 hurricane. The second is Tropical Storm Irwin. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 15.0 degrees North and longitude is 117.7 degrees West. Movement is East at 7mph. The third is shower and thunderstorm activity associated with a low pressure system located a few hundred miles south of the gulf of Tehuantepec has changed little and remains displaced to the west of the circulation center. However, upper-level winds could become a little more conducive for development over the next couple of days as the low moves generally toward the northeast at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 50% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have a new post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Philippe now a hurricane, Irwin and Jova in the Eastern Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 10:57 AM GMT on October 07, 2011

The current temperature is 53 and it feels like 53. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 87 with lows between 50 and 59. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring one named storm. The first is Hurricane Philippe. Winds are at 90mph with a pressure of 978mbars. Latitude is 29.6 degrees North and longitude is 56.3 degrees West. Movement is East-Northeast at 17mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will decrease to 85mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. However, there are two areas worth watching for possible development this weekend and into next week. The first area is off the west coast of Florida and the Bahamas. The second area is down in the Western Caribbean. While development is not likely down in the region over the next couple of days, this could become a breeding ground for tropical development later on this month. In fact, several long-range computer models are predicting something trying to form in the Western Caribbean during the middle of this month. So, it's something worth watching. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring two named storms and one area for possible development. The first is Hurricane Irwin. Winds are at 80mph with a pressure of 990mbars. Latitude is 13.7 degrees North and longitude is 119.8 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 10mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be at 90mph. By 1am saturday morning, winds will be at 105mph. On Irwin's current path, it is headed for Mexico. The second is Tropical Storm Jova. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1000mbars. Latitude is 13.4 degrees North and longitude is 109.5 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 12mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be at 60mph. By 1pm Saturday or earlier, it will be a 75mph category one hurricane. On Jova's current path, it is also headed for Mexico. The third is an area of disturbed weather is located several hundred miles south of the gulf of Tehuantepec. Upper-level winds appear somewhat conducive for slow development of this system. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 5 to 10mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a fantastic Friday and I'll have another post on Monday. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events. Have a great weekend!

Updated: 11:00 AM GMT on October 07, 2011

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Phillippe nearing hurricane intensity, T.D. #10 and #11 form in Eastern Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 10:34 AM GMT on October 06, 2011

The current temperature is 53 and it feels like 53. Highs will continue to range between 76 and 88 with lows between 47 and 56. No rain is in the forecast until next Tuesday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we continue to monitor Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 70mph with a pressure of 991mbars. Latitude is 26.8 degrees North and longitude is 60.6 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 8mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become a 75mph category 1 hurricane. Phillippe is not a threat to any landmasses. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring two tropical depression's. The first is Tropical Depression #10-E. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 10.3 degrees North and longitude is 105.8 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 9mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will be a tropical storm. The second is Tropical Depression #11-E. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1007mbars. Latitude is 11.9 degrees North and longitude is 116.8 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 6mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become a 40mph tropical storm. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Phillippe still hanging on, Eastern Pacific could get active again

By: JohnnyParker, 10:42 AM GMT on October 05, 2011

The current temperature is 49 and it feels like 49. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 87 with lows between 51 and 57. No rain is in the forecast until next Monday through Wednesday. At this time, precipitation chances will range between 30% to 60%. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we continue to monitor Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 65mph with a pressure of 997mbars. Latitude is 24.7 degrees North and longitude is 60.8 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 6mph. By 1am Thursday morning, Phillippe will have winds of 70mph. There is still the possibility that it reaches hurricane status. Phillippe is not a threat to Bermuda. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are now monitoring two areas for potential development. The first is showers and thunderstorms have become a little better organized in association with a broad area of low pressure centered about 800 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico. Conditions appear favorable for gradual development of this low during the next couple of days as it moves westward at about 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 30% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The second is an area of disturbed weather has formed several hundred miles south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. Environmental conditions appear conducive for some development of this system over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves to the west-northwest at about 10mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia dissipates, Phillippe could become a Hurricane

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on October 04, 2011

The current temperature is 44 and it feels like 44. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 87 with lows between 49 and 55. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Ophelia has dissipated and we continue to monitor Phillippe. Tropical Storm Phillippe has winds of 65mph with a pressure of 997mbars. Latitude is 23.6 degrees North and longitude is 58.3 degrees West. Movement is West at 10mph. As of now, it looks like Bermuda will not see any effects from Phillippe. Yes, Phillippe does have the potential to become a hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one area for possible development. The first is showers and thunderstorms associated with a weak area of low pressure located about 600 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico have become a little better organized during the past several hours. Development, if any, of this system is expected to be slow to occur as it moves westward at about 10mph during the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia racing off past Canada, Phillippe still the same

By: JohnnyParker, 10:35 AM GMT on October 03, 2011

The current temperature is 41 and it feels like 41. Highs will continue to range between 76 and 86 with lows between 45 and 55. No rain is in the forecast over the next several days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 70mph with a pressure of 983mbars. Latitude is 46.5 degrees North and longitude is 54.2 degrees West. Movement is Northeast at 43mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Cape Race and Newfoundland. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be down to 60mph. The last advisory should be issued later today on Ophelia. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 25.8 degrees North and longitude is 54.9 degrees West. Movement is West at 12mph. By 1pm today, winds will still be at 50mph. At this time, Phillippe will not affect any landmasses unless it continues further west than forecasted. If it does, then we would have to watch Bermuda for possible effects from Phillippe. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are watching one area for possible development. The first is a broad area of low pressure located several hundred miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Environmental conditions appear conducive for some gradual development of this disturbance during the next few days as it moves westward at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia weakens to a cat.2 and Phillippe maintaining tropical storm intensity

By: JohnnyParker, 6:50 PM GMT on October 02, 2011

The current temperature is 68 and it feels like 68. Highs will continue to range between 72 and 85 with lows between 41 and 54. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we continue to monitor two named storms. The first is Hurricane Ophelia. Winds are at 105mph with a pressure of 960mbars. Latitude is 40.3 degrees North and longitude is 60.3 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 33mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Newfoundland and the Avalon Peninsula. By 7pm or earlier, winds will be down to 90mph. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 26.3 degrees North and longitude is 51.7 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 12mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, winds will be down to 45mph. Phillippe may have effects on Bermuda down the road. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one area for possible development. Shower and thunderstorm activity remains limited in association with a broad area of low pressure centered several hundred miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. Any development of this system should be slow to occur as it moves westward at 5 to 10mph, and the National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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La Nina returns and my preliminary winter forecast

By: JohnnyParker, 8:00 PM GMT on October 01, 2011

La Nina has returned and long-range computer models predict that this will strengthen through fall and into winter. What could this mean for the United States? Well, typically La Nina brings warm and dry weather for the South and the Southwest in the winter and more severe weather in the spring for the Midwest and the South. The last La Nina we had was quiet the opposite during the winter due to a high pressure system over Greenland, also known as the "Greenland Block". This caused more cold air to push further south and the storm track was farther south, too. This provided more snow in places that rarely get any snow. The south, for example, was one of those places that saw several inches of snow last January. Now, as we headed into spring, the South was just getting into the Severe Weather Season. March was pretty quiet in the way of severe storms, but as we got in April, that changed dramatically. During the month of April, the South saw severe weather outbreaks almost each week. This was due to a very active jet stream pattern. April ended with a prolific and catastrophic severe weather outbreak that produced over 300 tornadoes that occurred the 25th through the 28th. The question is "will we see the same thing happen again during this La Nina?" Well, I don't believe that we will see another severe weather season like we saw last spring, but it is way too early to tell. Here is my forecast for this winter. The Greenland block may set up again. If this occurs, then we could see more cold air come farther south. I believe that we could see more cold weather and snow this winter in the South. This is only my opinion and I'll have more on the winter forecast as more information comes in.

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Ophelia becomes a cat.3, Phillippe still out there, Hillary dissipates

By: JohnnyParker, 5:07 PM GMT on October 01, 2011

The current temperature is 65 and it feels like 65. Highs will continue to range between 69 and 84 with lows between 41 and 55. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Hurricane Ophelia, which is now a category 3 storm. Winds are at 120mph with a pressure of 952mbars. Latitude is 29.5 degrees North and longitude is 62.9 degrees West. Movement is North at 21mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Bermuda. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 24.8 degrees North and longitude is 48.0 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 9mph. As of right now, the only land mass that Phillippe might affect is Bermuda. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hilary has dissipated and no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a fantastic Saturday and I'll have another update later today on my prediction for the upcoming winter season. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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About JohnnyParker

I am Johnny Parker and I am 20. I have studied the weather since I was 5. I have cerebral palsy and my goal is to become a meteorologist.