JohnnyParker's Blog

Ophelia becomes a cat.2, Phillippe still weak, Hilary now a tropical depression

By: JohnnyParker, 10:34 AM GMT on September 30, 2011

The current temperature is 63 and it feels like 63. Highs will continue to range between 71 and 84 with lows between 42 and 56. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Hurricane Ophelia, which is now a category 2 storm. Winds are at 100mph with a pressure of 973mbars. Latitude is 22.4 degrees North and longitude is 62.6 degrees West. Movement is North-Northwest at 9mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is now in effect for Bermuda. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be at 105mph. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 21.9 degrees North and longitude is 44.9 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 13mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will again increase to 50mph. As of now, Phillippe is no threat to land. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hilary has been downgraded to a tropical depression. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 22.5 degrees North and longitude is 121.4 degrees West. Movement is North-Northwest at 7mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia strengthening, Phillippe strengthens a little, Hilary continues to weaken

By: JohnnyParker, 10:41 AM GMT on September 29, 2011

The current temperature is 58 and it feels like 58. Highs will continue to range between 73 and 89 with lows between 43 and 57. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 995mbars. Latitude is 20.0 degrees North and longitude is 61.1 degrees West. Movement is North-Northwest at 7mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will intensify further to winds of 65mph. The only two landmasses that Ophelia might affect will be Bermuda and Newfoundland. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 17.8 degrees North and longitude is 41.7 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 13mph. By 1pm or earlier, winds will be at 50mph. At this time, Phillippe is not a threat to any landmasses. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hilary has weaken to a tropical storm. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 996mbars. Latitude is 20.0 degrees North and longitude is 119.9 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 7mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be down to 45mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia is back, Phillippe weak, and Hilary weakens to a cat.1

By: JohnnyParker, 10:39 AM GMT on September 28, 2011

The current temperature is 60 and it feels like 60. Highs will continue to range between 74 and 87 with lows between 45 and 58. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named systems. The first is Tropical Depression Ophelia. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1008mbars. Latitude is 18.6 degrees North and longitude is 60.0 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 3mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become a 45mph tropical storm. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 16.5 degrees North and longitude is 38.0 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 12mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hillary continues to weaken. Winds are down to 90mph with a pressure of 975mbars. Latitude is 17.7 degrees North and longitude is 118.1 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 7mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will decrease to 80mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events. Here is an update on the progress in Smithville, MS: houses are being built back, a gas station and a restaurant are being built, and they are continuing work on the school. Smithville is coming back, slowly, but surely.

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Ophelia making a comeback, Phillippe weakens, and Emily weakens

By: JohnnyParker, 10:36 AM GMT on September 27, 2011

The current temperature is 54 and it feels like 54. Highs will continue to range between 73 and 88 with lows between 45 and 59. There is a slight chance of a stray thunderstorm possible today. A few storms could be on the strong side with the main threats being small hail and gusty winds. Otherwise, no rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 16.1 degrees North and longitude is 35.1 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 7mph. By 1am Wedneday morning or earlier, winds will be at 45mph. The second is a low pressure system, the remnants of Ophelia, is centered a couple hundred miles northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands. Satellite data indicate that the surface circulation is gradually becoming better defined, and upper-level winds appear somewhat conducive for additional development of this low as it moves slowly northwestward during the next day or two. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 70% chance of regenerating into a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Locally heavy rains are possible over portions of the Northern Leeward Islands through Wednesday. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are still monitoring Hurricane Hilary. Winds are at 115mph with a pressure of 961mbars. Latitude is 16.6 degrees North and longitude is 115.7 degrees West. Movement is West at 10mph. By 1am Wednesday morning or earlier, Hilary will weaken to a 105mph category 2 storm. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia dissipates, Phillippe maintains intensity, and Hilary weakens

By: JohnnyParker, 10:44 AM GMT on September 26, 2011

The current temperature is 71 and it feels like 71. Highs will continue to range between 75 and 88 with lows between 45 and 59. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms today. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring one system. The first is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 997mbars. Latitude is 14.7 degrees North and longitude is 33.4 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 13mph. At this time, Phillippe is not predicted to become a hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one system. The first is Hurricane Emily. Winds are at 120mph with a pressure of 959mbars. Latitude is 16.9 degrees North and longitude is 112.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 10mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will decrease to 115mph. Hilary is predicted to take a turn more to the North in the next few days. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm's Ophelia and Phillippe in Atlantic, Hilary in Eastern Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 6:50 PM GMT on September 25, 2011

The current temeperature is 81, but it feels like 84. Highs will continue to range between 78 and 87 with lows between 50 and 66. There is a slight chance of a stray thunderstorm possible today. There is a 50% chance of scattered thunderstorms tonight. On Monday and Tuesday, there is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being large hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1008mbars. Latitude is 18.3 degrees North and longitude is 60.4 degrees West. Movement is West at 9mph. Ophelia is not predicted to intensify much over the next few days as it is under high wind shear. As of now, the only land area that Ophelia may have impacts on is Bermuda. The second is Tropical Storm Phillippe. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 12.5 degrees North and longitude is 30.7 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 12mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, winds will increase to 50mph. Phillippe is predicted to stay out to sea and not have any affects on land. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hurricane Emily is headed west, but it is predicted to take a turn north toward Baja California later on. Winds are at 125mph with a pressure of 953mbars. Latitude is 17.2 degrees North and longitude is 109.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 9mph. By 7am Monday morning or earlier, it will have winds of 120mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Ophelia strengthens at little, T.D. #17 forms, and Hilary maintains cat.4 intensity

By: JohnnyParker, 4:02 PM GMT on September 24, 2011

The current temperature is 68 and it feels like 68. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 87 with lows between 51 and 64. Rain is in the forecast Monday through Tuesday. Precipitation chances will be between 30% and 40% both days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring 3 areas. The first is Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 17.8 degrees North and longitude is 56.0 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 13mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, it will have winds of 45mph. The only land area that Ophelia may affect will be Bermuda. The second is Tropical Depression #17. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 11.0 degrees North and longitude is 26.7 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 16mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, it will become 40mph Tropical Storm Phillippe. Phillippe will stay out to sea and have no affects on any landmasses. The third is disorganized showers and thunderstorms over portions of the northwestern and central Bahamas are associated with a surface trough. Development of this disturbance, if any, should be slow to occur as it moves generally northward at 10 to 15mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are continue to monitor one system. That system is Hurricane Hilary, which is a category 4 storm. Winds are at 140mph with a pressure of 946mbars. Latitude is 16.6 degrees North and longitude is 106.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 12mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, it will have winds of 135mph. Hilary could affect Baja California later on. Hilary could also send very needed rains to Northern Mexico and Texas. This depends on the track that it takes, though. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a fantastic Saturday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm Ophelia weakening, Hurricane Hilary becomes a cat.4

By: JohnnyParker, 10:36 AM GMT on September 23, 2011

The current temperature is 61 and it feels like 61. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 84 with lows between 51 and 64. There is a 30% chance of morning showers today. Rain will return Sunday through Tuesday of next week. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we continue to monitored Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1004mbars. Latitude is 14.5 degrees North and longitude is 51.0 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 13mph. By 1pm or earlier, winds will decrease to 40mph. By 1am Saturday morning or earlier, it will be a 35mph tropical depression. The only land area that could be impacted by Ophelia is Bermuda, but I believe that the impacts for Bermuda will be minor since Ophelia has weakened rapidly. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we continue to monitor Hurricane Hilary. Winds are at 145mph with a pressure of 944mbars. Latitude is 16.0 degrees North and longitude is 101.9 degrees West. Movement is West at 9mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Lagunas de Chacahua westward to Punta San Telmo, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from West of Punta San Telmo to Manzanillo, Mexico. Main threats will continue to be heavy rain between 2-5 inches with locally up to 10 inches, high winds, swells, high waves, rough surf, rough seas, beach erosion, and rip currents. There is a possibility that Hilary could become a category 5. By 1pm today or earlier, it will have winds of 150mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm Ophelia strengthens, Tropical Storm Hilary near cat.1 strength

By: JohnnyParker, 10:39 AM GMT on September 22, 2011

The current temperature is 63 and it feels like 63. Highs will continue to range between 80 and 87 with lows between 52 and 60. There is a slight chance of a stray thunderstorm possible today across North MS. Otherwise, no rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring one system. That is Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 65mph with a pressure of 994mbars. Latitude is 13.7 degrees North and longitude is 46.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 15mph. Ophelia is not predicted to become a hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Hilary is gaining strength. Winds are at 70mph with a pressure of 991mbars. Latitude is 14.7 degrees North and longitude is 98.1 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 9mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Punta Maldonado, Mexico to Zihuatanejo, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for La Barra de Navidad, Mexico. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become a 80mph category 1 hurricane. Main threats will be high winds, heavy rain between 3-5 inches with isolated amounts up to 10 inches possible, high surf, high waves, beach erosion, and rip currents. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm Ophelia forms in Atlantic, T.D. #9-E forms in Eastern Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on September 21, 2011

The current temperature is 68 and it feels like 68. Highs will continue to range between 75 and 86 with lows between 51 and 61. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we now have Tropical Storm Ophelia. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 12.7 degrees North and longitude is 41.8 degrees West. Movement is West at 13mph. By 1am Thursday morning or earlier, it will have winds of 50mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we now have Tropical Depression #9-E. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 13.4 degrees North and longitude is 96.5 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 5mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become Tropical Storm Hilary. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Watching both the Atlantic and the Eastern Pacific for development

By: JohnnyParker, 10:30 AM GMT on September 20, 2011

The current temperature is 70 and it feels like 70. Highs will continue to range between 78 and 85 with lows between 51 and 63. Rain is in the forecast today and Wednesday. Precipitation chances will be between 30% to 50%. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring one area for possible development. The first is a large low pressure system is located about 1500 miles east of the Windward Islands. Thunderstorm activity is gradually becoming better organized, and environmental conditions are expected to remain conducive for a tropical depression to form during the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 70% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 5 to 10mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are also monitoring one area for possible development. The first is a low pressure system centered about 225 miles southeast of Puerto Escondido, Mexico continues to show signs of improved organization. Conditions are expected to be favorable for additional development of this disturbance over the next couple of days as it move west-northwestward at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 50% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Tuesday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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New depression could form in Atlantic and Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 11:23 AM GMT on September 19, 2011

The current temperature is 68 and it feels like 68. Highs will continue to range between 77 and 86 with lows between 50 and 63. There is a 90% chance of thunderstorms today. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are montoring two areas for potential development. The first is a well-defined low pressure area is located over the central tropical atlantic about 1450 miles east of the Windward Islands. Thunderstorm activity has become better organized and more concentrated near the center of the low, and environmental conditions appear favorable for the development of a tropical depression during the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at about 10mph. The second is thunderstorms have redeveloped near the center of a small low pressure system located about 950 miles east of the Northern Leeward Islands However, any further development of this system should be slow to occur due to unfavorable upper-level winds. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one area for potential development. The first is a broad low pressure system located about 275 miles south of the gulf of tehuantepec is producing a large area of cloudiness and scattered showers. Some slow development of this disturbance is possible over the next couple of days as it moves westward at 5 to 10mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Watching two areas in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 6:19 PM GMT on September 18, 2011

The current temperature is 77 and it feels like 77. Highs will continue to range between 74 and 85 with lows between 53 and 65. Rain is in the forecast today through Thursday. Precipitation chances will be between 30% to 50%. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being small hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is a broad area of low pressure located over the central tropical atlantic about midway between the lesser antilles and the west coast of Africa has changed little in organization over the past few hours. Environmental conditions appear favorable for gradual development of this disturbance over the next few days as it moves slowly westward. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The second is shower and thunderstorm activity has not become any better organized in association with a weak area of low pressure located about 1200 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands. Any development of this system is expected to be slow to occur due to unfavorable upper-level winds. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Sunday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Maria dissipates and watching one area for potential development

By: JohnnyParker, 5:29 PM GMT on September 17, 2011

The current temperature is 76 and it feels like 76. Highs will continue to range between 82 and 86 with lows between 58 and 64. Rain returns Monday through Thursday with a slight chance of showers and storms Sunday. Precipitation chances will range between 20% to 60%. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being large hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Maria has dissipated and we are monitoring one area for potential development. The first is a broad low pressure system located about 400 miles southeast of the Southern Cape Verde Islands is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Some slow development of this low is possible during the next couple of days as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 30% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one area for possible development. The first is a small area of low pressure located a couple hundred miles west of Manzanillo, Mexico is producing disorganized shower and thunderstorm activity. Any development of this system is expected to be slow to occur as it interacts with a larger disturbance to its southwest. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 20% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Saturday and I'll be back with another update tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Maria becomes our third hurricane of the 2011 season

By: JohnnyParker, 10:38 AM GMT on September 16, 2011

The current temperature is 51 and it feels like 51. Highs will continue to range between 79 and 87 with lows between 55 and 63. Rain returns Monday through Wednesday of next week. Precipitation chances are between 30 to 40%. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are still monitoring Hurricane Maria. Winds are at 80mph with a pressure of 979mbars. Latitude is 41.7 degrees North and longitude is 60.3 degrees West. Movement is Northeast at 45mph. A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Newfoundland from Arnold's Cove to Brigus South. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Newfoundland from Stone's Cove to Arnold's Cove and from Brigus South to Charlottetown. Maria should dissipate and become extratropical later today. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, cloudiness and showers associated with a weak area of low pressure centered about 275 miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico remain disorganized. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward to west-northwestward at about 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Friday and I'll be back with another update tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Storm Maria headed toward Bermuda, some activity in the Pacific

By: JohnnyParker, 10:33 AM GMT on September 15, 2011

The current temperature is 64 and it feels like 64. Highs will continue to range between 75 and 88 with lows between 50 and 63. There is slight chance of showers and thunderstorms tonight. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Maria. Winds are at 65mph with a pressure of 999mbars. Latitude is 30.2 degrees North and longitude is 68.4 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 26mph. By 1pm today or earlier, Maria is predicted to become a 75mph category 1 hurricane. A Tropical Storm Warning and a Hurricane Watch are in effect for Bermuda. The second is an area of cloudiness and showers located a couple hundred miles south of the Southern Cape Verde Islands is associated with a westward moving tropical wave. There are no signs of organization and development, if any, is expected to be slow. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, shower activity associated with an area of disturbed weather located a few hundred miles south of Acapulco, Mexico has diminished. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves westward at about 10mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Maria strengthens a little, Eastern Pacific quiet, and cooler temperatures

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on September 14, 2011

The current temperature is 61 and it feels like 61. Highs will continue to range between 78 and 92 with lows between 53 and 63. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms today. The timing will be late this afternoon into Wednesday night. A few storms could be strong to severe with the main threats being quarter size hail and damaging winds. Secondary threats will be heavy rain and flash flooding. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Tropical Storm Maria is still on track toward Bermuda. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 1001mbars. Latitude is 24.2 degrees North and longitude is 68.6 degrees West. Movement is North-Northwest at 10mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bermuda. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will be up to 65mph. Maria is not predicted to become a hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Wednesday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Maria struggling and Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on September 13, 2011

The current temperature is 62 and it feels like 62. Highs will continue to range between 81 and 92 with lows between 56 and 65. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms Wednesday and a 60% chance of scattered thunderstorms Thursday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Tropical Storm Maria is struggling to strengthen due to wind shear. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 21.6 degrees North and longitude is 67.7 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 5mph. By 1am Thursday morning, it will have winds of 60mph. By 1pm Thursday, Maria will have winds of 65mph. As of now, Maria is not predicted to intensify into a hurricane. There is a Tropical Storm Watch in effect for Bermuda. Maria is not forecasted to have any impacts on the East Coast of the United States. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Nate has dissipated, Maria strengthening, and Eastern Pacific remains quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:25 AM GMT on September 12, 2011

The current temperature is 61 and it feels like 61. Highs will continue to range between 83 and 92 with lows between 55 and 63. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms in the forecast for Wednesday and Thursday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, Nate has dissipated and we are still monitoring Maria. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 1005mbars. Latitude is 20.8 degrees North and longitude is 66.3 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 9mph. By 1am Thursday morning, Maria is predicted to become a 75mph category 1 hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it remains quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Monday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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Nate makes landfall in Mexico and Maria intensifying, Eastern Pacific quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 6:34 PM GMT on September 11, 2011

The current temperature is 78 and it feels like 78. Highs will continue to range between 84 and 91 with lows between 57 and 63. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms today and on Thursday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two named storms. The first is Tropical Storm Maria. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 1007mbars. Latitude is 19.0 degrees North and longitude is 64.6 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 10mph. No Tropical Storm Watches or Warnings are in effect. The track of Maria takes it near Bermuda and Canada. The East Coast of the United States may see increased surf and a rip current threat, but no direct impacts. Maria is predicted to become a hurricane by 7am Wednesday morning. The second is Tropical Storm Nate, which has made landfall in Mexico. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1007mbars. Latitude is 20.5 degrees North and longitude is 97.2 degrees West. A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect from Tuxpan, Mexico to Veracruz, Mexico. Main threats will be flash flooding, heavy rainfall, mudslides, and high winds. By 7pm tonight or earlier, Nate will become a 30mph tropical depression with the final advisory being issued later today. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Sunday and I'll have another update tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events. Also, remember and pray for the 9/11 victims and their families.

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Katia has dissipated, still watching Tropical Storm's Nate and Maria

By: JohnnyParker, 6:01 PM GMT on September 10, 2011

The current temperature is 82, but it feels like 81. Highs will continue to range between 81 and 91 with lows between 56 and 62. There is a 30% chance of isolated thunderstorms Sunday and next Friday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are now monitoring two named storms. The National Hurricane Center has issued their last advisory on Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 80mph with a pressure of 954mbars. Latitude is 44.7 degrees North and longitude is 47.7 degrees West. Movement is East-Northeast at 53mph. The path of Katia will take toward the United Kingdom and then toward Norway. The first is Tropical Storm Maria. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1007mbars. Latitude is 17.3 degrees North and longitude is 61.5 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 15mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, Maria will be a 35mph tropical depression. By 7am Monday morning, it will reintensify into a 40mph tropical storm. As of right now, Maria is not predicted to become a hurricane. All Tropical Storm Watches and Warnings have been discontinued. The second is Tropical Storm Nate. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1000mbars. Latitude is 20.0 degrees North and longitude is 94.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 6mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, winds will increase to 60mph. A Hurricane Watch is in effect from Tampico, Mexico to Veracruz, Mexico. A Tropical Storm Warning is also in effect from Tampico, Mexico to Punta El Lagarto, Mexico. Main threats will be heavy rain between 5 to 12 inches, mudslides, flash flooding, high surf, and high winds. As of now, Nate is not predicted to become a hurricane. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring two areas for possible development. The first is shower and thunderstorm activity continues in association with an area of low pressure located about 725 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Some development of this system is possible over the next day or so before it moves slowly northward toward cooler waters. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 30% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. The second is a weak area of low pressure located about 1550 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Any development of this system should be slow to occur as it moves little over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Neither of these two systems are a threat to any landmasses. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Saturday and I'll have another update tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Katia weakening, Maria struggling, and Nate strengthening

By: JohnnyParker, 10:37 AM GMT on September 09, 2011

The current temperature is 52 and it feels like 52. Highs will continue to range between 82 and 89 with lows between 55 and 65. No rain is in the forecast over the next several days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring three named storms. First is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 85mph with a pressure of 967mbars. Latitude is 37.6 degrees North and longitude is 67.5 degrees West. Movement is Northeast at 24mph. Second is Tropical Storm Maria. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Wind shear is keeping Maria at bay, for now. Latitude is 13.8 degrees North and longitude is 56.2 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 18mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Montserrat, St. Barthelemy, Antigua/Barbuda, Dominica, and Martinique. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Guadeloupe, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saba, and Virgin Islands. Third is Tropical Storm Nate. Winds are at 65mph with a pressure of 998mbars. Latitude is 19.9 degrees North and longitude is 92.3 degrees West. Movement is stationary. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will increase to 70mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Chilitepec, Campeche, and Celestun. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Celestun and Progreso. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, it is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Friday and I'll have another update tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Atlantic active: Katia, Maria, and now Nate, Eastern Pacific still quiet

By: JohnnyParker, 10:41 AM GMT on September 08, 2011

The current temperature is 55 and it feels like 55. Highs will continue to range between 78 and 88 with lows between 53 and 63. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we now have three named storms. The first is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 90mph with a pressure of 970mbars. Latitude is 32.0 degrees North and longitude is 70.2 degrees West. Movement is North at 14mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Bermuda. Main threats for Bermuda and along the East Coast will be: beach erosion, rip currents, and high surf. The second is Tropical Storm Maria. Winds are at 50mph with a pressure of 1002mbars. Latitude is 13.5 degrees North and longitude is 48.2 degrees West. Movement is West at 23mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the Leeward Islands, Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, and St.Kitts and Nevis. The third is Tropical Storm Nate, which is in the Bay of Campeche. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 20.4 degrees North and longitude is 92.4 degrees West. Movement is East at 1mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Mexico: from Chilitepec to Celestun. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will increase to 50mph. Nate is forecasted to become a hurricane before it makes its final landfall in Mexico. I am still concerned of two things that could happen this season. First, it is possible that we will use all the names on the list and start using the greek alphabet. The last time that the greek alphabet had to be used was in the 2005 season. Second, I still believe that before the end of this season that we will have a major hurricane becoming a category 5. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

Updated: 10:46 AM GMT on September 08, 2011

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Katia weakens to a category 1 and Tropical Depression Fourteen forms

By: JohnnyParker, 10:45 AM GMT on September 07, 2011

The current temperature is 54 and it feels like 54. Highs will continue to range between 76 and 89 with lows between 53 and 65. No rain is in the forecast over the next couple of days. The total rainfall from Lee that I recorded in my rain gauge was: 7.78 inches. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring 4 areas. The first is Hurricane Katia. Winds are down to 90mph with a pressure of 973mbars. Latitude is 28.7 degrees North and longitude is 67.9 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 10mph. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Bermuda. Main threats will be wind, some rain, rip currents, and high surf. Main threats from Katia along the East Coast will be: rip currents and high surf. The second is Tropical Depression Fourteen. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 12.0 degrees North and longitude is 39.9 degrees West. Movement is West at 20mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will be 40mph Tropical Storm Maria. The third is a broad area of low pressure located over the extreme southwestern Gulf of Mexico has changed little in organization over the past few hours, but some gradual development of this system is possible over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 40% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone as it moves little during the next 48 hours. An Air Force reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft is scheduled to investigate this system today, if necessary. The fourth is a tropical wave located about 300 miles east of the Leeward Islands is expected to bring cloudiness and showers over these islands during the next day or so as it moves westward at around 20mph. Upper-level winds are not favorable for significant development, and the National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring one area. The first is a broad area of low pressure located a couple hundred miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico is producing a large area of disorganized cloudiness and showers. Development, if any, of this system is expected to be slow to occur as it moves slowly West-Northwestward. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Wednesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Hurricane Katia now a category 3, Maria on the horizon

By: JohnnyParker, 10:33 AM GMT on September 06, 2011

The current temperature is 58 and it feels like 58. Highs will continue to range between 68 and 87 with lows between 53 and 64. There is a 30% chance of pm showers today, but nothing much. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 125mph with a pressure of 950mbars. Latitude is 26.5 degrees North and longitude is 65.1 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 10mph. By 1pm today or earlier, Katia is predicted to become a 135mph category 4. If it does, then Katia will become our first category 4 storm of the season. Katia is not forecasted to hit Bermuda or the East Coast, but it may have indirect impacts. These threats are: high surf, swells, beach erosion, and rip currents. The second is shower and thunderstorm activity associated with an area of low pressure located about 600 miles southwest of the Southern Cape Verde Islands has changed little in organization during the past several hours. However, environmental conditions appear favorable for a tropical depression to form over the next day or two as this disturbance moves Westward or West-Northwestward at around 15mph. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Tuesday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Remnants of Lee producing very heavy rain, Katia still a cat.2

By: JohnnyParker, 10:33 AM GMT on September 05, 2011

The current temperature is 68 and it feels like 68. Highs will range between 70 and 85 with lows between 54 and 63. A Flash Flood Warning is in effect until 8am this morning. A Flash Flood Watch is in effect until 7am Tuesday morning. A Wind Advisory is in effect until 7pm Tuesday night. There is a 100% chance of heavy rain/wind today. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are watching only one system. The National Hurricane Center has issued their final advisory on Lee. All Tropical Storm Warnings have been discontinued. Main threats from Lee will continue to be: heavy, flooding rains between 4 to 8 inches, winds between 10 to 20mph with wind gusts between 30 to near 40mph, and isolated tornadoes. The first is Hurricane Katia. Winds are still at 100mph with a pressure of 972mbars. Latitude is 23.9 degrees North and longitude is 62.0 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 12mph. By 1pm today or earlier, winds will increase to 105mph By 1pm Tuesday or earlier, Katia will become a 115mph category 3. At this time, Katia will not have direct impact on the East coast or Bermuda. Although, the threats will be high waves, rip currents, and swells along the beaches. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Monday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

Updated: 10:48 AM GMT on September 05, 2011

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Tropical Storm Lee makes landfall, Katia now a category 2

By: JohnnyParker, 6:19 PM GMT on September 04, 2011

The current temperature is 74 and it feels like 74 with rain showers. Highs will continue to range between 72 and 87 with lows between 55 and 67. Rain is in the forecast through Wednesday. Precipitation chances will be between 30% to 100%. Most of the heaviest rain will occur today through Monday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Lee. Winds are at 45mph with a pressure of 987mbars. Latitude is 30.4 degrees North and longitude is 91.8 degrees West. Movement is North-Northeast at 8mph. A Tropical Storm Warning continues to be in effect from Destin, Florida westward to Sabine Pass, Texas. Main threats for the South and along the Gulf Coast are: heavy rainfall between 6 to 10 inches with locally 15 inches+, winds between 10 to 20mph with gusts between 25 to near 40mph, coastal flooding and isolated tornadoes (mainly along the Gulf Coast), storm surge, rip currents, power outages, and high surf. Main threats for North MS are: heavy, flooding rains between 6 to 10+ inches with locally 15+ inches, isolated tornado threat, power outages, and winds between 10 to 20mph with wind gusts between 25 to near 40mph. A Flash Flood Watch is in effect from parts of the South. A Flood Watch is in effect for North MS. I believe that the Flood Watch could be upgraded to a Flash Flood Watch as time goes on. A Wind Advisory may also be needed. The second is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 100mph with a pressure of 966mbars. Latitude is 21.9 degrees North and longitude is 59.2 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 12mph. By 7pm tonight or earlier, it will have winds of 110mph. By 7am Monday morning or earlier, it will become a 115mph category 3 hurricane. The current path that Katia is on will take it near the East Coast. At this time, the main threats will be rip currents and high surf. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

Updated: 6:39 PM GMT on September 04, 2011

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Tropical Storm Lee nearing landfall, Katia regains hurricane intensity

By: JohnnyParker, 6:28 PM GMT on September 03, 2011

The current temperature is 91, but it feels like 90. Highs will continue to range between 68 and 97 with lows between 56 and 72. Rain returns Sunday through Tuesday. Precipitation chances will range between 80% and 90%. Sundays winds will be out of the East at 8mph. Mondays winds will be out of the East at 21mph. Tuesdays winds will be out of the North at 17mph. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Tropical Storm Lee. Winds are at 60mph with a pressure of 991mbars. Latitude is 29.3 degrees North and longitude is 91.8 degrees West. Movement is stationary. A Tropical Storm Warning is still in effect from the Alabama/Florida Border to Sabine Pass, Texas. Main threats will be heavy rain, flash flooding, coastal flooding, gusty winds, rip currents, high surf, and isolated tornadoes along to gulf coast. Rainfall will be between 6 to 10 inches with locally 15+ inches. A Wind Advisory and a Flash Flood Watch could be issued later today or Sunday. The second is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 75mph with a pressure of 989mbars. Latitude is 19.6 degrees North and longitude is 55.8 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 10mph. By 7pm Sunday night or earlier, Katia will have winds of 80mph. At this time, the only land area that could be affected by Katia is Bermuda. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, all is quiet with no development predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Saturday and I'll have another post later today if something significant changes with Lee. If not, then I'll have a post tomorrow. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

Updated: 6:33 PM GMT on September 03, 2011

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Tropical Depression Thirteen upgraded to Tropical Storm Lee

By: JohnnyParker, 7:00 PM GMT on September 02, 2011

Tropical Depression Thirteen has been upgraded to Tropical Storm Lee. Winds are at 40mph with a pressure of 1003mbars. Latitude is 27.4 degrees North and longitude is 91.5 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 2mph. By 7am Saturday morning or earlier, winds will be up to 50mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Pascagoula, MS westward to Sabine Pass, Texas. Main threats will be heavy, flooding rains, significant coastal flooding, high surf, rip currents, high winds, storm surge, and isolated tornadoes, which will be mainly along the Gulf Coast. There is a slight possibility that Lee could become our third hurricane before making landfall. Rainfall along the Gulf Coast and up toward near Columbus, MS will be between 8 to 12 inches with locally 10 to 20 inches in some areas. Rainfall across North MS and the remainder of the South will be between 4 to 8 inches or more. Lee will a very slow mover and flooding could be catastrophic in some locations across the Gulf Coast. I'll have another full post in tomorrow.

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Katia weakens, Tropical Depression Thirteen to become Lee later today

By: JohnnyParker, 10:43 AM GMT on September 02, 2011

The current temperature is 74 and it feels like 74. Highs will continue to range between 76 and 99 with lows between 60 and 71. No rain in the forecast until Sunday through Wednesday. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring three areas. The first is Tropical Storm Katia. Winds are at 70mph with a pressure of 994mbars. Latitude is 17.0 degrees North and longitude is 51.8 degrees West. Movement is West-Northwest at 15mph. By 1pm Saturday, it will intensify again to a 75mph category 1 hurricane. It is still too early to tell whether or not Katia will have any effects on the United States. The second is Tropical Depression Thirteen. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1006mbars. Latitude is 26.5 degrees North and longitude is 91.7 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 2mph. By 1pm today or earlier, it will become 40mph Tropical Storm Lee. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Pascagoula, MS to Sabine Pass, TX. Main threats will be heavy, flooding rains of 5 to 8 inches with locally 10+ inches, rip currents, coastal flooding, high surf, flash flooding, and some wind. The third area is shower activity associated with a low pressure system located about 450 miles south of Halifax, Nova Scotia has become more concentrated during the past several hours. This system is producing winds of tropical storm force, and only a slight increase could result in the formation of a tropical storm. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves toward the Northeast at 10 to 15mph. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, we are monitoring the remnants of Tropical Depression Eight. The National Hurricane Center is only giving this system a 10% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves West-Northwestward at about 10mph. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a good Friday and I'll have another post tomorrow or later today if necessary. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and for those affected by damaging weather events.

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Tropical Depression Thirteen forms in the Gulf of Mexico

By: JohnnyParker, 12:35 AM GMT on September 02, 2011

Tropical Depression #13 has formed in the Gulf of Mexico. Winds are at 35mph with a pressure of 1007mbars. Latitude is 26.6 degrees North and longitude is 91.4 degrees West. Movement is Northwest at 6mph. By 1am Fridy morning, it will become 40mph Tropical Storm Lee. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect along the Gulf coast from Pascagoula, MS to Sabine Pass, TX. Main threats will be heavy, flooding rains of 4 to 8 inches with locally 10+ inches in some places, significant coastal flooding, high surf, and rip currents. At this time, the wind threat is low, but could increase depending on how much it intensifies. I'll have a full post tomorrow morning.

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Katia now our second hurricane of the season, Lee possible in the Gulf

By: JohnnyParker, 10:32 AM GMT on September 01, 2011

The current temperature is 74 and it feels like 74. Highs will continue to range between 83 and 99 with lows between 57 and 70. No rain in the forecast over the next couple of days. Now, for your tropical update. In the Atlantic, we are monitoring two areas. The first is Hurricane Katia. Winds are at 75mph with a pressure of 987mbars. Latitude is 15.2 degrees North and longitude is 45.9 degrees West. Movement is West at 20mph. By 1pm or earlier, winds will be at 80mph. It is still to early to say if Katia will be a threat to Florida or the East Coast. The second is a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms over the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, associated with a trough of low pressure, has changed little in organization during the past several hours. Upper-level winds are currently unfavorable for development. However, conditions are forecast to become more conducive later today, and the system could become a tropical depression during the next day or so. The National Hurricane Center is giving this system a 60% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly northwestward. Interests along the entire Northern Gulf of Mexico coast should monitor the progress of this disturbance. Elsewhere across the Atlantic, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. In the Eastern Pacific, the National Hurricane Center has issued the last advisory on Tropical Depression Eight. Elsewhere across the Eastern Pacific, no development is predicted over the next couple of days. Hope yall are having a great Thursday and I'll have another post tomorrow morning. Continue to pray for the tornado victims and those affected by damaging weather events.

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About JohnnyParker

I am Johnny Parker and I am 20. I have studied the weather since I was 5. I have cerebral palsy and my goal is to become a meteorologist.