Jet stream moved northwards 270 miles in 22 years; climate change to blame?

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:11 PM GMT on June 05, 2008

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Climate change is forcing the jet stream higher and closer to the pole in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere, according research published this April in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. In their paper, "Historical trends in the jet streams", researchers Cristina Archer and Ken Caldeira of Stanford's Carnegie Institution of Washington analyzed data from 1979-2001, and found that the Northern Hemisphere jet stream moved northward at approximately 125 miles per decade (270 miles during the 22-year period of the study). The jet moved higher by 5-23 meters during this period, and the wind speeds decreased by about 1 mph. Archer and Caldeira's study confirms other research showing a poleward movement of the jet stream in recent decades (Fu et al., 2006; Hu and Fu, 2007). All of these changes are consistent with the behavior of the jet stream predicted by global warming theory. For example, Lorenz and DeWeaver (2007) found poleward shifts of the jet stream by 2100 in the forecasts of 15 climate models used to formulate the "official" word on climate, the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) report. However, the authors were careful not to say how much of this shift in the jet stream was due to natural causes versus human-caused climate change. It is unknown if the jet stream has natural decades-long changes in its path that could account for the observed poleward shift.


Figure 1. The jet stream is located where the strongest winds at the top of the troposphere are found (35,000-45,000 feet high, 200-300 mb in pressure).

Archer and Caldeira note that "These changes in jet stream latitude, altitude, and strength have likely affected, and perhaps will continue to affect, the formation and evolution of storms in the mid-latitudes and of hurricanes in the sub-tropical regions." They don't specify what these changes might be. There is very little research that has been done suggesting how changes in the jet stream might affect hurricane formation and strength. One effect we may begin to see in coming decades is a reduction and/or delay in the number of hurricanes that recurve northward out to sea. Recurvature occurs when a hurricane begins to "feel" the westerly winds of the jet stream. As the jet stream continues to move northward and weaken as the globe warms, we can expect that hurricanes moving though the Caribbean will be less likely to recurve, resulting in more hurricane strikes in Mexico and Central America. Unfortunately, the quality of the Atlantic hurricane database for non-U.S. landfalls is not very good, and it will be several decades before we will be able to tell if the number of hurricane landfalls in Mexico and Central America is increasing due to a poleward shift in the jet stream.

References
Fu, Q., C. M. Johanson, J. M. Wallace, and T. Reichler (2006), Enhanced mid-latitude tropospheric warming in satellite measurements, Science, 312, 1179, doi:10.1126/science.1125566.

Hu, Y., and Q. Fu (2007), Observed poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation since 1979, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Disc., 7, 9367.9384.

Lorenz, D. J., and E. T. DeWeaver (2007), Tropopause height and zonal wind response to global warming in the IPCC scenario integrations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10119, doi:10.1029/2006JD008087.

Jeff Masters

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1164. caymanjaroo
2:24 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
Thunder in the distance....maybe some rain in Cayman today.
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1163. stormlvr
2:13 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
1131. flibinite 8:43 AM GMT on June 08, 2008

We have come a long way in this field. I can remember when we did all manual analysis and worked an entire shift just to issue a good 24-48 hour forecast. You can access more information on the internet in 10 minutes than we ever had. I will concede that most modeling has been developed fairly recently and may not properly account for certain parameters particularly changing oceanic circulations and temperature profiles. There are also variables and interactions of variables that are not completely understood or are even unknown at this point. Have hope, we will continue to progress. Just watching some of the bright young minds on this blog makes me sure of that. The biggest danger is kneejerk reactions to phenomena that is not completely understood.
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1162. SLU
2:16 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
**yawn**

Anyone looking at 7n 40w? Looks much better than the last wave when it was in the same location 4 - 5 days ago.
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1161. BajaALemt
9:22 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
Pearl....

SPC's outlooks can be found here Link
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1160. pearlandaggie
2:20 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
very nice, surfmom!

any idea why the mango is doing so well?
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1159. Weather456
10:07 AM AST on June 08, 2008
Updated
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1158. BajaALemt
9:18 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
Great idea, mom! (G'mornin btw)
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1157. surfmom
2:09 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
Well the mantra this morning seems to be we are all calling out for Rain. my yard is a cross between a tinderbox and a dust bowl. I never water, but my mango tree burdened w/a bumper crop of developing fruit is begging me to turn on the drip hose. Have also taken time to be sure all bird baths have clean water, as well as a few low lying tubs of water for other wild critters. (my chickens eat the mosquito larvae) For those of us looking for rain, please think of the wild critters, they're thirsty too --a bird bath or two filled w/fresh water is an act of kindness the furry & feathered ones will appreciate.
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
1156. stoormfury
2:01 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
the tropical atl , carib and g/mex
are extremely quiet today and will be so for th along time. the computer models are showing no development for the next ten days. wind shesr is very high in the MDR except in the vicinity of a trop wave in the eastern atl where shear is about 5-10 knots. the sal is weak but SST is still below optimum temp for cyclogenesis. i have been follwing trpical storm activity for a long time and i have a gut feeling that 2008 could be an extraordinary year where increase activity will be the order of the day.
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1155. pearlandaggie
2:09 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
1152 and 1153. feel free to come mow my lawn anytime! :)
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1154. pearlandaggie
2:00 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
so how's the tornadic weather outlook? anyone expecting some rough weather in the next few days?
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1153. weatherfromFlorida
1:43 PM GMT on June 08, 2008
1152. I am afraid to mow as well, without a hat and some sunscreen down here in Florida.
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1152. ClearH2OFla
9:37 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Good Morning Everyone. Not a rain Drop in site for me here. My Back yard is a tinder box. I am afraid to mow it.
1151. Weather456
1:22 AM AST on June 08, 2008
Tropical Update/Tracking Tropical Waves
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1150. BahaHurican
8:38 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Well this seems like a good day to do some outdoor work; the cloudiness from the ULL will keep ambient temperatures down while producing constant breezes, and the tropics seem quiet today. Only area of serious interest is the one off the west Mexican coast, and even that isn't heavily favoured for development at this current time.

E OF 110W...
MAIN ITEM OF INTEREST IS A DEVELOPING LOW PRESSURE AREA JUST
WEST OF THE GULF OF TEHUANTEPEC NEAR 14N97W. THIS FEATURE
DEMONSTRATES PERSISTENT CYCLONIC CURVATURE ON IR SATELLITE
IMAGERY AND IS IN AN AREA OF GOOD DIVERGENCE ALOFT ON THE
SOUTHERN PORTION OF AN UPPER ANTICYCLONE. THE CIRCULATION
OBSERVED ON SATELLITE IMAGERY MAY BE AT THE MID LEVELS
HOWEVER...SINCE SHIP OBSERVATIONS FROM 00Z AND 06Z SHOW
SOUTHERLY FLOW TO THE WEST OF THE CIRCULATION. VISIBLE SATELLITE
IMAGERY AND SCATTEROMETER PASSES MAY SHED LIGHT ON THIS. AT ANY
RATE...THE SYSTEM REMAINS WEAK IN AN AREA OF MODERATE SHEAR. THE
LOW IS INTERACTING WITH THE MEXICAN COAST...WHERE EVENING
CONVECTION IS FLARING JUST OFFSHORE AROUND THE LOW CENTER.
GLOBAL MODEL CONSENSUS SHOW A WEAK LOW FORMING TO THE WEST OF
THIS POSITION SOUTH OF ACAPULCO THROUGH SUNDAY...BUT WITH A
GENERAL NW DRIFT ALONG OR TOWARD LAND...LIKELY WEAKENING THE
SYSTEM. THE APPROACHING WEAK TROPICAL WAVE FROM THE EAST MAY
INTERACT WITH THE DEVELOPING LOW...ADDING TO CONVECTIVE
POTENTIAL ALONG THE MEXICAN COAST AND JUST INLAND. THIS WILL BE
LIMITED TO SOUTH OF 20N. MODELS INDICATE THE UPPER RIDGE WILL
SHIFT NW AS AN UPPER TROUGH DIGS THROUGH THE ROCKIES. THIS WILL
BRING DRIER AIR SOUTH INTO CENTRAL MEXICO THROUGH EARLY NEXT
WEEK...LIMITING MUCH CONVECTIVE DEVELOPMENT TO THE NORTH.
MEANWHILE...LONG PERIOD SW SWELL OF UP TO 7 FT WILL PUSH INTO
SOUTHERN MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA BY TUE THEN DECAY.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22563
1149. BahaHurican
8:35 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Looks like the ITCZ has come up a bit.

...ITCZ...

ITCZ AXIS IS CENTERED ALONG 10N14W 7N20W 7N40W 4N51W. SCATTERED
MODERATE CONVECTION IS OFF THE COAST OF W AFRICA FROM 3N-4N
BETWEEN 10W-12W. ISOLATED MODERATE CONVECTION IS FROM EQ-3N
BETWEEN 16W-28W...AND FROM 6N-8N BETWEEN 53W-58W.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22563
1148. BahaHurican
8:31 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
1146. weathermanwannabe 8:25 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
That weakening ULL heading towards Florida has lost a lot of steam and is only visible on the WV loops...


It's still visible on IR too. Unfortunately u are right about the precipitable water . . . LOL
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22563
1147. BahaHurican
8:17 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Morning everybody.

Looking at the ULL. Unfortunately it seems to be bringing limited moisture with it as it moves through. We got another light shower or two overnight, but right now we have only partly cloudy skies and a light easterly wind. Looks like Cat and Long Islands, along with Exuma, may get a bit more than here on New Providence.

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22563
1146. weathermanwannabe
8:20 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Good Morning.....I see the GW debate has already started early on Sunday morning....Hey Ike...Getting ready to go to church but I see the tropics are quiet....That weakening ULL heading towards Florida has lost a lot of steam and is only visible on the WV loops...Do not think it will get picked up by the Trof (and head towards GA/FL border)....Maybe the "timing" will cooincide with maximum heating this afternoon and enhance some "pop-up" showers for South Florida.....Have a Blessed Day and I'll See Everyone Later or Tommorow......WW
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9323
1145. IKE
7:24 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
I have a 40% chance of rain the next 4 afternoons....then 50% Thursday and Friday...in the Florida panhandle.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
1144. XoendHoroeken
8:20 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
At least for the peninsula of Florida, the change is occurring today. This is the first time all season that I've had a 40% chance of rain in North Tampa, and the chances are looking good for the rest of the week as well. Finally back to big bad seabreeze season in Florida.
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1143. IKE
7:17 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
1141. aquak9 6:57 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
Thanks Ike. Would love to see the long range give us some change here in the southeast, rain would be good for all of us.


It's fixing to change....the high is going to break down....normal summertime weather is going to return.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
1142. cantstopthinking
11:44 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
As to Flibinites point, I agree with some of your statements of course my angle is somewhat different. We have know idea or even a nominal understanding of climate change and its effects. Our entire galaxy is moving through space at around 300,000 miles per hour. I could only imagine as we travel through space there are galactic forces that effect the galaxy and the thousands of solar systems within. Stop for a moment and think, the Earth turns on its axis at around 1000 miles per hour, while orbiting the sun in 365 days, and our solar system orbits the center of the galaxy every 230 million years, all the while the galaxy is moving through space at around 300,000 miles per hour. Now are things changing?? LOL Oh Ya ! That's an understatement. But don’t worry we have experts working on understanding it all right now!
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1141. aquak9
7:54 AM EDT on June 08, 2008
Thanks Ike. Would love to see the long range give us some change here in the southeast, rain would be good for all of us.
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1140. IKE
6:30 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Gasoline rose to a milestone mark Sunday as the national average compiled by motorist group AAA reached $4 a gallon for the first time.

The national average for regular unleaded rose 1.7 cents to $4.005, according the daily measure on the group's Web site. That surpassed the previous record of $3.989 set Thursday.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
1139. IKE
6:22 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
The weather pattern is fixing to change over the SE USA....

"Long term...(tuesday night through sunday) models
(gfs...ecwmf...NAM...and dgex) continue to show a trend towards a
reduction in the strength of the ridge over the southeast
beginning Tuesday evening. The breakdown is in response to the
retrogression of the inter-mountain long wave back west to the
eastern Pacific by Sunday. Two strong shortwaves dive southeast
from the Gulf of Alaska during this transition. The first wave
migrates east and ends up reinforcing the development of a long
wave trough over the eastern U.S. By the end of the period. The
second wave settles over the West Coast. The net effect is to
nudge the very hot southeast U.S. Ridge westward to the
southwestern sections of the country. A TUTT low...now located
over the Bahamas will meander westward across Florida and bring a
swath of moisture into the Gulf of Mexico by Tuesday. This will
occur just as the hot dry southeast U.S. Ridge begins it's nudge
westward. The combination of increasing southwesterly flow from
the Gulf of Mexico and increased moisture will result in a much
more active seabreeze regeime through most of the long term
period. Scattered showers on Tuesday afternoon will give way to
increased seabreeze activity on Wednesday afternoon as precipitable waters
pretty Jump Up above 1.70 inch. Precipitation water exceeds 2.00 inches
and lifted indices ramp up to to -6 to -7 range beginning on
Thursday. If the models are right...this will bring welcome relief
from the extreme heat and at least a more optimistic chance for
seabreeze showers and thunderstorms across the area at least
through Friday and possibly into the weekend.".............


from the Tallahassee weather office.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
1138. SpaceThrilla1207
11:20 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
Thank gawd I live in Dallas and we got some rain to cool things down.

I feel bad for you Floridians who have to suffer through the high pressure and still be humid. AND yet still have to be wary about the tropics since it's hurricane season.
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1137. sporteguy03
10:52 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
Hi Stormjunkie, MLC, JP, Drak, 456, StormW,
Enjoy the heat today it will be hot hot hot.
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1136. sporteguy03
10:47 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
1131
Change is inevitable
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1135. pearlandaggie
10:31 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
1131. i've been there for quite some time. as an engineer, there are times when i'm forced to concede that we don't know enough about a system (be it a reactor with complex kinetics or a multicomponent distillation column) to predict how it will react to some change we want to try to introduce. the fact is that we've lost our humility--we believe that because we can model something, we can predict the future and possibly even effect a change somehow. look at hurricane models...after millions and possibly billions of man-hours spent developing them, we STILL have arguments as to which one to believe and when! all i'm trying to say is that we must understand that there are things (and there always will be) that are simply beyond our capacity to fully understand, let along change.

a very well-respected colleague put it to me this way..."All models are wrong; some are useful." inherent in that statement is an acknowledgment of unforeseen dynamics in a system translating to real world modeling imperfections.

by the way, here's an article you might find interesting...

Link
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1134. bluejohn
9:05 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
This seems to be alarmism in the extreme! The jet stream shifts north/south annually in a natural cycle and has always done so. Climate change has nothing to do with it.
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1133. moonlightcowboy
3:43 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
1129, 1130. Thrilla, that sounds like reasonable discernment to me.
Member Since: July 9, 2006 Posts: 184 Comments: 29610
1132. robodave
8:32 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
Someone mentioned earlier that putting "wind-turbines" on cars should be considered, lol. In all honesty, you'd probably lose more than you gain from it, if done incorrectly. The turbine would need to have minimal impact on the aerodynamics of the vehicle while it's in its unused state. It might work, if the turbine could engage itself when you're going down-hill. During that phase, the car isn't having to work hard because of gravity and you probably would see a gain of some sort. I'm not sure how much, but probably hardly worth it.

With gas prices so high and climate change topics so common, it's not surprising that more of us are wondering how to make our cars more effective at what they do. I think vehicle manufacturers see the light at the end of the tunnel and are responding. They may have dragged their feet in the past, but pretty soon american preferance will shift and force them to sell vehicles with better mileage. Afterall, they said it themselves that americans prefer fuel-guzzlers over gas-savers, historically. That is what has driven the market to this point. The manufacturers aren't changing, it's the consumers who're doing that.
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1131. flibinite
8:32 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
(Very few of you will ever see this, but I'm going to post it anyways...)

As this particular blog seems to be dead and buried, I guess this is the best place for what I've wanted to say for a while, to all of you, even Jeff Masters, our "guru" and lead poster. Be honest now... how many of you think that things have started to change, and rather massively, in the past few years? How many of you think the computer long-range forecasting models are simply out of their league, as they use regression analysis and information from years gone by that is no longer in play, that is no longer valid as part of their prognostic computations anymore?

You can call it Global Warming or simply global change, but how many of you read the posts about four days ago from a member here saying that the fishermen and "long-timers" on the Gulf Coast were worried... not worried because they saw bad omens, but worried because they were seeing things they'd never seen before. There are three red spots on Jupiter now, where there was only one less than two years ago, for example. How many of you can remember the Northwest Passage as ever being open in the lifetime of satellites and global forecasting models, either, for another example.

If you believe the Gaia model of the Earth, along with the heat build-ups all over, especially north of the Arctic Circle, then last year's hurricane season makes total sense. Why should the heat and the humidity at the equator necessarily head north when it wasn't truly needed there? Why not just kick up two Cat 5's because of the latent heat and send them in any old westerly direction, in this case, Central America.

2005 was bad; it was awful and unprecedented, and thus all the predictive computer models had 2006 being major, and terrible... yet, argumentatively, it wasn't. Certainly 2007 would get back into the post-1995, GW "groove" and be just awful, too. It was, but it mainly wasn't, with the ACE at almost a unbelieveability historic low, globally, considering all the history of the past dozen years.

Have any, or all of you sat there with your models and your history and your feelings and your educated guesses and thought to yourself, "Honestly, we don't really know anything about this brave, new meteorologic and astrophysical world, do we?"

I know I've thought that.

I'm worried right now that last year will repeat, unless, or maybe because, the Sun reactivates, as it's very dormant now, and getting a bit overdue to start its next solar cycle. But with the SST's down a bit from 2005 levels, and a weaker AB high, and these relentless fronts sliding through the US out of a continuingly cool Canada, I can see the two or three Dean's and Felix's turning north this year, and ending up god know's where in the Gulf. We dodged a major, major bullet with Rita, and even Humberto to an extent, and I honestly don't see us getting as lucky a second time around.

Anybody who wants to call this wishcasting, then please just go back to bed, as if you think I wish to see $6.00 a gallon gas, and people's lives totally ruined, then you're simply full of crud, and to me, your opinions... because that's what they are, same as mine... no longer matter to me.

I think things have changed, and changed dramatically, thoughout the whole solar system, and that we're guessing in the dark, to mix metaphors, about anything that will happen this Atlantic hurricane season. I was just wondering if any/many of you far more learned members here are sort of reaching the same conclusions, are starting to feel that you really don't know, anymore, exactly what causes what, and why, and what might happen to all of us this year?

Jo
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1130. SpaceThrilla1207
8:00 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
sal

Very light SAL comparitively. There's light dust in the GOM that the dry air has allowed to come in, which will be gone once the big fat ugly stupid high moves out. And, as the ITCZ lifts north it will wash out the SAL up until about 15N east of 55W.

Don't know what's up with all that SAL near Bermuda. Guess anything that tries to for that far west and north is doomed. Of course, that's only subtropical systems that do that...
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1129. SpaceThrilla1207
7:51 AM GMT on June 08, 2008
'04 had much less saharan dust, much lower than average. See where Danielle, Frances, Ivan, Karl, Lisa formed.

'05 had the WAY above average dust, peaking in Late July and Early August. Note the extremely few Cape Verde storms despite the long season.

'06 had slightly above average to average dust. Though, the dust wasn't nearly as bad as 2005. We did see a few Cape Verde hurricanes that year, despite the below-average numbers.

'07 had ever-so-slightly below average dust...and we saw several Cape Verde storms, one being the notable Category 5 Hurricane Dean.

'08 I think we'll have well below average african dust again, as we saw in 2004. I think SST's will in the 2004 range, and, unfortunately, a similar number of US landfalls. Be prepared.
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1128. Randyman
12:20 AM CDT on June 08, 2008
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TOPEKA KS
1205 AM CDT SUN JUN 8 2008

.A VERY MOIST AIRMASS WILL BE IN PLACE SUNDAY NIGHT AS A COLD
FRONT MOVES FROM NORTH TO SOUTH ACROSS THE AREA. DEEP CONVECTION
IS ANTICIPATED TO DEVELOP ALONG THE FRONT AND PRODUCE PERIODS OF
HEAVY RAINFALL. INDICATIONS ARE THAT AREAS COULD RECEIVE RAINFALL
AMOUNTS ON THE ORDER OF 2 INCHES BEFORE THE RAINFALL ENDS MONDAY.
CURRENT SOIL CONDITIONS AND AREA RIVERS ARE RATHER MOIST GIVEN
RECENT RAINS. GIVEN THE FORECAST RAINFALL AMOUNTS...THERE IS THE
POTENTIAL FOR FLASH FLOODING AS WELL AS RIVER FLOODING.


JEFFERSON-MORRIS-WABAUNSEE-SHAWNEE-DOUGLAS-LYON-OSAGE-FRANKLIN-
COFFEY-ANDERSON-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...TOPEKA...LAWRENCE...EMPORIA...OTTAWA
1205 AM CDT SUN JUN 8 2008

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH
MONDAY AFTERNOON...

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

* PORTIONS OF EAST CENTRAL KANSAS AND NORTHEAST KANSAS...
INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS...IN EAST CENTRAL KANSAS...
ANDERSON...COFFEY...DOUGLAS...FRANKLIN...LYON...MORRIS...
OSAGE...SHAWNEE AND WABAUNSEE. IN NORTHEAST KANSAS...JEFFERSON.

* FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH MONDAY AFTERNOON

* HEAVY RAINFALL IS FORECAST TO OCCUR SUNDAY NIGHT INTO MONDAY
MORNING AS A COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE AREA. WIDESPREAD
AMOUNTS OF 1.5 TO 2 INCHES IS LIKELY WITH LOCAL AREAS POSSIBLY
RECEIVING AS MUCH AS 3 INCHES OF RAINFALL. WITH SOIL CONDITIONS
ALREADY MOIST...THIS RAINFALL COULD LIKELY CAUSE FLASH FLOODING
AS WELL AS RIVER FLOODING.

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE BUT NOT
IMMINENT IN THE WATCH AREA. PERSONS IN THE WATCH AREA ARE ADVISED
TO CHECK PREPAREDNESS REQUIREMENTS...KEEP INFORMED...AND BE READY
FOR QUICK ACTION IF FLOODING THREATENS.
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1122. InTheCone
10:43 PM EDT on June 07, 2008
1121.

Yes - Indeed!!
Member Since: September 1, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1990
1119. InTheCone
10:34 PM EDT on June 07, 2008
Thanks Storm -

Just have to hope! If it stays just to the east - we'll be dry!!

Member Since: September 1, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1990
1117. HIEXPRESS
10:26 PM EDT on June 07, 2008
1106. sporteguy03
Sad to see Jim McKay pass away he was much revered in his industry as John Hope was in Weather.

Speaking of John Hope - He passed away 6 years ago this Friday.
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1115. InTheCone
10:24 PM EDT on June 07, 2008
Hey Storm -

Do you think the ULL east of Fl. will make it far enough west to bring any moisture in?
Member Since: September 1, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1990
1114. Levi32
6:18 PM AKDT on June 07, 2008
1101. leftovers 6:04 PM AKDT on June 07, 2008

I think that's definitely something worth keeping an eye on next week. That wave is going to end up in the Gulf of Mexico with a favorable upper air pattern. It's something that may not happen at all, but I've learned to pay attention to the low-lying waves that slip all the way across the Atlantic until they encounter favorable conditions in the Caribbean/GOM.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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