A cool, snowy January for the globe in 2008

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:25 PM GMT on February 15, 2008

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It's been a cool and snowy winter across much of the Northern Hemisphere so far this year, making it pretty unlikely that 2008 will end up ranking as one of the top five warmest years on record. January 2008 was just the 31st warmest January for the the globe on record, according to statistics released by the National Climatic Data Center. For land areas only, January 2008 ranked near average--63rd warmest in the 130 years since global record keeping began in 1880. It was the coldest January since 1982, and marked a noticeable departure from the string of much warmer than average months the globe has experienced over the past eight years. A good portion of the global cool down in January can be credited to the current strong La Niña episode. Ocean surface temperatures in large areas of the central and eastern equatorial Pacific were more than 3°F (1.7°C) below average in January. The continuation of cooler-than-average temperatures dampened the global ocean average, which was the 17th warmest on record for January. The last time the globe was this cold was in November of 2000. Not coincidentally, that month marked the peak of the last major La Niña episode, as defined by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.


Figure 1. Northern Hemisphere snow cover set a new record for January, narrowly besting the record set in 1985. Image credit: National Climatic Data Center.

The extent of January snow cover in 2008 was the greatest on record for the Northern Hemisphere, narrowly besting the record set in 1985. Snow cover records extend back to 1967. Much of the record snow cover can be attributed to the cold and snowy weather experienced in China and southern Asia. However, Australia experienced its warmest January on record, and much of northern Russia had temperatures more than 5°C (9°F) above average in January.

U.S. temperatures: below average in January
For the contiguous U.S., January 2008 was 0.3°F (0.2°C) below average, and was the 49th coolest January since U.S. weather records began in 1895. It was the coldest January in the U.S. since 2003. January 2008 temperatures across much of the western U.S. were below normal, with near-normal temperatures across the Midwest, South, and Southeast regions. In contrast to the rest of the country, temperatures were above normal in the Northeast, which had its 20th warmest January on record.

Sea ice extent
January 2008 Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent was the fifth lowest on record for the month of January, 8% below its extent in 1979 when satellite measurements began, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center. January was the third straight month that a new monthly minimum Arctic sea ice record was not set, following a string of five months in a row where monthly records were set. However, while the ice extent is not at a record low this month, the volume of the arctic ice is probably at a record low for January. The ice is exceptionally thin across the Arctic this winter, and the edge of this thin first-year ice extends all the way to the North Pole. The latest sea ice extent map and temperature anomaly map for the globe are available at our Climate Change web page, which we update each month.

Severe weather in Texas Saturday
If you live in Texas, keep a wary weather eye on Saturday. NOAA's Storm Prediction Center has placed a portion of Eastern Texas, including Houston, Austin, and San Antonio, under its Moderate Risk region for tornadoes and severe thunderstorms.

Jeff Masters

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166. Cavin Rawlins
10:30 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION....

Upper ridging and very dry stable flow covers most of the Caribbean Basin this evening thereby hindering shower activity and allowing fair conditions to exist at the surface. Meanwhile, scattered cloudiness and showers is seen along the southern Central American Isthmus in association with the ITCZ enhanced by the outflow (divergence aloft) accompanied by the upper ridge. Trades and swells are easterly at 10-20 knots and 6-7 ft, respectively. These conditions relaxed somewhat due to the passage of the frontal trough that broke down the ridge to the north of the region.

by W456
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
165. Cavin Rawlins
10:14 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
hello atm
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
164. Cavin Rawlins
10:07 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
....SYNOPSIS....

GULF OF MEXICO/NORTHWEST ATLANTIC OCEAN WEST OF 50W....

Where to start? First, a moist shallow layer of low clouds is seen along the coastal slopes of the Sierra Madre and the Gulf of Mexico west of 93W and north of 20N. This layer is tied to leftover moisture from the previous frontal boundary enhanced by the calm conditions associated with upper confluence and a weak surface ridge. Meanwhile, a frontal boundary is dying across the Southern Gulf of Mexico from the Bay of Campeche to the Florida Straits. Weak surface high pressure over Louisiana producing fair weather across the Southeast United States and 10-20 knot easterly winds and 6-7 ft swells across the Gulf waters. These conditions are expected to remain relatively unchanged for the next 24 hrs.

A cold front is pushing its way across the Western Atlantic from the Florida Straits, across the Northern Bahamas to beyond 32N/65W, accompanied by a 120 nmi swath of cloudiness and showers. A surface ridge centered on a 1029 mb high near 34N/50W protrudes across the Atlantic ahead of the front providing 20 knot anticyclonic flow with fair weather and widely scattered patches of cloudiness.

by W456
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
163. atmoaggie
9:45 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
Greetings earthling 456.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
162. atmoaggie
9:34 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
121. atmoaggie 12:37 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Just wanted to share an experience many of you would probably appreciate:

Last night at almost midnight EST, I was flying from Miami to New Orleans. The route took us right past the southern end of our latest neighborhood cold front and I happened to have a window seat on the right side of the plane, a 737.

We were cruising at 35000 feet, well above some low clouds. About 10 miles outside my window were the cumulus towers along the frontal boundary all of which was well illuminated by moonlight from above. The towers were very well defined with sheer cliff-like sides, at least on the south side. This went on for about an hour of the flight over the Gulf. An absolutely awesome view. The cloud tops were well above our flight level and overshooting tops evident. We all know they are there. We have seen pictures, the effects, and in some cases studied the thoery behind it all in college. But to cleary see the towers at eye level and follow the edge of the front for an hour...awesome. I have to guess that only pilots are afforded such a neat , in person, view on a regular basis.

To cap that off was the cloud-to-cloud lightning every 5 seconds or so which was also clearly visible. What a spectacle! I wish I had my camera and AA had killed the D@MN#D cabin lights!

To be honest, that hour was far more entertaining than anything else I saw in Miami including my 30 minute, one-on-one discussion with Bill Read (more on that later)!


Baha, the Bill Read discussion, oddly enough, was very little about tropical at all. Most of it was about gridded products NHC/NWS could make available to the marine weather community...data like currents, SST, wind analyses, wave analyses, etc.
We did talk a little about a few of the HRD researchers we both know, like Landsea, Powell and we also talked about the eventual replacement of QuikScat with HIRAD, or something like it.

HIRAD is the proposed space-based SFMR with a wide enough field of view to capture an entire storm's wind field.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
161. Cavin Rawlins
9:26 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
booya afternoon to all
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
159. franck
7:02 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
To Build a Fire illustrates the basic attitude of man to his environment. That's why everything is getting so messed up.
Member Since: August 30, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 1150
158. Patrap
6:55 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
NOAA Weather Alert Radio info: Link
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129795
154. Patrap
3:18 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
El Nino with earlier clashes of GOM Moisture and Cold pushes south, equals more Severe Outbreaks.

Encourage friends and relatives to invest in a Quality NOAA Ready Alert Radio.

Have a good day weathermanwannabe.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129795
153. weathermanwannabe
3:08 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
Well; I'll get back to work this morning but have a great day (especially Storm and Patrap).....I'm sure we will be back on here in force over the next few weeks as some typical severe weather develops going into March....(To my eyes, that damn El Nina seems to be "enhancing" chances for severe weather outbreaks accross the SE.................)...Take Care All
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9402
152. Patrap
2:56 PM GMT on February 19, 2008

405
fxus64 klix 190929
afdlix


Area forecast discussion
National Weather Service New Orleans la
329 am CST Tuesday Feb 19 2008


Short term...
Arctic cold front moving southward through central Arkansas this
morning. Return flow and moisture will begin today over the deep south.
The first signs of this will be the large area of low level clouds
over NE Mexico and adjacent Gulf waters moving north then NE toward
our area. This will also be the moisture that funnels along the
cold frontal axis while short wave ripples move along the slowly
advancing cold front providing extra lift to the moisture. This coupled
with the upper trough jet will begin to promote rainfall which
will invade the area from the SW by Wednesday. The cold front finally
sneaks its way to near the mcb area by Friday before stalling. A surface
low then forms along the front in south Texas and quickly moves NE
bringing the rain to an end during the day Sat. Location of the
boundary and distance away will determine our rain chances and
severe probabilities. Local model(ros) solutions are still
showing severe weather is a good probability and so no changes to
ongoing package have been made as things still look very good the
way they are displayed. Will mention severe weather possible in severe weather potential statement.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129795
151. weathermanwannabe
2:54 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
Good Morning Storm.........Another potential round of severe weather for the SE going into next week?
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9402
149. weathermanwannabe
2:46 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
Hey All..........Too early to tell (as discussed by Tallahassee NWS below this morning) but the warmer the SE gets over the next several days, the better the chances of another round of potentially severe weather going into the weekend/next week.....

.LONG TERM (THURSDAY NIGHT THROUGH UESDAY)...AFTER THE PROTECTING SFC RIDGE FINALLY WEAKENS AND MOVES EAST OF THE AREA...UNSETTLED CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO RETURN FOR THE END OF THE WEEK AND FIRST
HALF OF THE UPCOMING WEEKEND...AS A CLASSIC BATTLEGROUND SETS UP BETWEEN ARCTIC AIR TO THE NW AND THE BUILDING SUB TROPICAL RIDGE TO
THE SE. WHERE THE CWA ENDS UP POSITIONED IN THIS BATTLEGROUND IS STILL SOMEWHAT UNCERTAIN...AND WILL ULTIMATELY BE DETERMINED BY HOW FAR TO THE NW THE SUB TROPICAL UPPER RIDGE BUILDS TOWARD THE SE GULF OF MEXICO AND HOW QUICKLY THE NEXT DOMINANT SHORTWAVE EJECTS OUT FROM THE DESERT SW. COMPARED TO LAST NIGHT`S 00 UTC MODEL RUNS...THE PROJECTED CONFLUENCE ZONE APPEARS TO BE TRENDING FURTHER NORTHWARD WHICH WOULD PUT MUCH OF THE AREA IN THE WARM SECTOR ON THU AND FRI...WITH SCATTERED SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS DEVELOPING EACH DAY AS SFC WAVES RIDE EASTWARD ALONG STALLED OUT BOUNDARY...BEFORE THE STRONGER SHORTWAVE FINALLY PUSHES A COLD FRONT THROUGH THE REGION ON SATURDAY. IT`S A BIT EARLY TO SPECULATE ON THE SEVERE WX PROSPECTS WITH THIS SYSTEM...BUT A CURSORY LOOK WOULD SEEM TO INDICATE THE POTENTIAL FOR QUITE FAVORABLE INSTABILITY ONCE AGAIN.


We shall see what happens but enjoy the nice weather for the rest of the week..........Spring is almost here.....
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9402
148. NEwxguy
2:34 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
GM all,interesting weather pattern developing for the east toward the end of the week.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 888 Comments: 15987
147. ShenValleyFlyFish
1:15 PM GMT on February 19, 2008
143. LowerCal

That story is so well written I can barely stand to read it. What a genius.
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
146. FLWeatherFreak91
10:22 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Has anyone seen this in the long range GFS? Looks fun for Fl...This is Thursday the 28th.

Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3634
145. guygee
9:58 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Hey Folks.
The Climate Prediction Center's New Feb 18th Weekly ENSO Evolution, Status, and Prediction Presentation is out in either PDF or PPT. Includes detailed analysis of the ongoing and evolving La Nina and its effects on atmospheric circulation, temperature and precipitation over the U.S., interactions with MJO events, and other interesting discussions. Also contains a list of historical reclassified La Nina and El Nino events since 1950 based on the ERSST.v3 SST anomalies in the Nino 3.4 region calculated with respect to the 1971-2000 base period.

Most of the models now call for a continuation of La Nina at least well into the summer, and the Climate Forecast System (CFS) model ensemble predicts the La Nina will persist into the Fall, right through the heart of the Atlantic hurricane Season.

I had been reading the old monthly text 90 day forecast discussions that contained the ENSO update, but it seems these were discontinued. These weekly reports are very informative and are worth the larger download as they contain all of the related graphical products along with discussion.

\
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3200
144. sullivanweather
6:21 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Well...short story...haha

Either way, it was good.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
143. LowerCal
6:18 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Book? It's a lot shorter than you remember Sully. ;^) Check the link, bro. Read it again, I know you'll enjoy it. :^)
Member Since: July 26, 2006 Posts: 58 Comments: 9303
142. sullivanweather
6:12 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
To Build a Fire was a great book.

I enjoyed it and recommend it.
Member Since: March 8, 2007 Posts: 273 Comments: 12612
141. LowerCal
6:10 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
133. ShenValleyFlyFish 7:48 PM PST on February 18, 2008

Fitness has nothing to do with survival in the face of nature's fury, its mostly about luck. Anyone who asserts otherwise is an arrogant fool who has never had to try.


Reminds me of something I just read.
To Build a Fire, by Jack London
Member Since: July 26, 2006 Posts: 58 Comments: 9303
140. BahaHurican
5:22 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
I'm also noticing that Ivan's centre of circulation seems to have crossed the centre of the island without being seriously disrupted. Is there a chance for regeneration, bringing much unwanted rains to the Mozambique coast?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
139. BahaHurican
5:11 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
http://allafrica.com/stories/200802181498.html

Southern Africa: Cyclone Ivan Sweeps Across Madagascar, Heads for Mozambique

UN Integrated Regional Information Networks

18 February 2008
Posted to the web 18 February 2008

Johannesburg

Tropical cyclone "Ivan" made its way across the Indian Ocean and slammed into Madagascar's northeastern coast on Sunday, 18 February. The exact extent of the destruction is not yet known, but government and aid agencies fear the worst as the storm makes its way through some of the island's most heavily populated areas.

According to Dia Styvanley Soa, spokeswoman for the National Office for Natural Disasters Preparedness (BNGRC), "Nine people were crushed under the rubble of a hotel," and have been presumed dead, at least two other people were reported dead and thousands more have been affected.


Ivan, a category four cyclone - the scale only goes to five - while still over the sea, and winds of up to 210km per hour just before it hit, made its way across the island as a category three, slowly diminishing in strength to a tropical storm. Its expected trajectory has taken it just north of the capital, Antananarivo.

No figures but fear for the worst

"There are no figures yet. Assessment are underway but we expect extensive damage, initially because of the winds, and over the next few days because of flooding," Edouard Libeau, Emergency Specialist at the UN's Children Fund (UNICEF) in Madagascar, told IRIN while he was stranded in Madagascar's second city, Toamasina, in the east of the island, while trying to reach the affected areas.

"We are 100 kilometres [south] from where the eye of the cyclone landed. There are very strong winds, infrastructure has been damaged, bridges have been flooded and we cannot pass. Electric cables are broken, roofs have been ripped off, one out of every five electricity poles is down." He said schools and hospitals had also been severely damaged.

Libeau estimated that over two million Malagasy lived in the towns, cities and villages that had been in the path of the storm, though he expected fewer would have been directly affected.

According to the BNGRC's Soa, "Ivan passed though highly populated areas and there was lots of rain. Almost all the towns where Ivan has passed are flooded now. The level of rivers and the sea is rising, and in the capital there is also risk of floods."

A BNGRC team and helicopter were deployed to assess the situation on Monday. "Assessment is the priority now, to know exactly the extent of the damage. We know there is a need for food, for shelter, but we don't know for how many people," Soa said.

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
138. BahaHurican
4:55 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
How cool!

Australian radar loops.

Click on Learmonth to see how close Nicholas is getting. Use the 256k view for longrange viewing.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
137. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
4:31 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
hey weather for me maybe mother nature will give you a rakin one never knows funny how things work sometime
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 178 Comments: 55983
136. ShenValleyFlyFish
4:15 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Hi V26R Which season do yu have in mind?
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
135. V26R
3:52 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Hi Shen, How long til your season starts?
Member Since: July 20, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1762
134. V26R
3:51 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Weathers4me
Think many of us would like clarification
Member Since: July 20, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1762
133. ShenValleyFlyFish
3:48 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Fitness has nothing to do with survival in the face of nature's fury, its mostly about luck. Anyone who asserts otherwise is an arrogant fool who has never had to try.
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
132. tmangray
3:03 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Northern California may be in for another monster storm Saturday evening like the one we had in January. One of the computer models is showing a "976 MB BOMB OFF THE NORTHERN CA COAST" by that time. Plenty of moisture out there and the Pacific jet is ramping up. We shall see.
131. weathers4me
2:41 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Baha: Do you need clarification????
Member Since: May 24, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 118
130. BahaHurican
2:37 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
129. weathers4me 9:35 PM EST on February 18, 2008
Mother Nature took her rake to Madagascar and cleaned up a bit. Nothing new. So goes the never-ending cycle of life. No big deal to the fittest of creatures.



Huh?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
129. weathers4me
2:35 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Mother Nature took her rake to Madagascar and cleaned up a bit. Nothing new. So goes the never-ending cycle of life. No big deal to the fittest of creatures.
Member Since: May 24, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 118
127. BahaHurican
2:17 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
122. surfmom

Yeah, that island reminded me of Cozumel during Wilma. I would not want to be there . . .

121. atmoaggie

That sounds like it was a cool flight. Your're not the only one who would have been begging for the lights to go out - I've been known to stick my head under train curtain windows so I could get a night-time picture of storm clouds . . . LOL

We're looking forward to hearing about your conversation w/ Bill Read. Are u going to put it on your blog?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
126. Tazmanian
2:02 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
456 i sent you mail
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115454
125. surfmom
1:30 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
g'night -walking dog - check in tomorrow
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
124. surfmom
1:23 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Got skunk as far as surfing today, barely rideable swell for an hour or so --had been expecting a better sell --rumour has it some little leftovers for the WFL Gomex SRQ area best to check the sites before being late for school or work
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
123. surfmom
1:19 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Well the front passed over head, SRQ/East of I75/WFL at approx 4:00 today --the clouds were spectacular in shape and in motion, It looked like it would thunder and pour, but it kinds blew over head and head out further out east. We were working horses on some very flat open acreage, beautiful, but a little scarey as I was afraid of lightening, but NADA - it was cool to watch the line and it was a clear line of clouds come tumbling in.
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
122. surfmom
1:11 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
BahaH I saw that little island and was wondering just how badly it hit --it looked like Ivan consumed it.
Member Since: July 18, 2007 Posts: 30 Comments: 26536
121. atmoaggie
12:37 AM GMT on February 19, 2008
Just wanted to share an experience many of you would probably appreciate:

Last night at almost midnight EST, I was flying from Miami to New Orleans. The route took us right past the southern end of our latest neighborhood cold front and I happened to have a window seat on the right side of the plane, a 737.

We were cruising at 35000 feet, well above some low clouds. About 10 miles outside my window were the cumulus towers along the frontal boundary all of which was well illuminated by moonlight from above. The towers were very well defined with sheer cliff-like sides, at least on the south side. This went on for about an hour of the flight over the Gulf. An absolutely awesome view. The cloud tops were well above our flight level and overshooting tops evident. We all know they are there. We have seen pictures, the effects, and in some cases studied the thoery behind it all in college. But to cleary see the towers at eye level and follow the edge of the front for an hour...awesome. I have to guess that only pilots are afforded such a neat , in person, view on a regular basis.

To cap that off was the cloud-to-cloud lightning every 5 seconds or so which was also clearly visible. What a spectacle! I wish I had my camera and AA had killed the D@MN#D cabin lights!

To be honest, that hour was far more entertaining than anything else I saw in Miami including my 30 minute, one-on-one discussion with Bill Read (more on that later)!

Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
120. NorthxCakalaky
12:07 AM GMT on February 19, 2008

(Few tornados hit N.C)

02/18/2008 0412 am

2 miles E of Snow Hill, Greene County.

Tornado, reported by NWS storm survey.


*** 3 inj *** two Mobile homes with roofs off and two
story house leveled. Preliminary report from NWS storm
survey indicates damage was from a tornado... estimated
EF2 on Enhanced Fujita scale.



119. Tazmanian
11:59 PM GMT on February 18, 2008
The warm and dry weather that has persisted in CA as of late will quickly come to an end over the next 24 hours. A weak area of low pressure is currently generating an area of mid-level clouds over the state, possibly leading to a light shower or two overnight. A splitting system will then move in overnight, bringing some light rain to much of CA tomorrow. Rainfall totals should be less than 0.25 inches across the board, and snow levels won’t drop much below 3000-3500 feet, even in the north. A somewhat stronger system will move in by Thursday, bringing more rainfall (0.50-1.5 inches in the north; 0.25-0.75 in. in the south) and lower snow levels (2500-3000 feet in the north), but generally nothing too impressive. The intensity of the third and apparently final system in the series, however, has been increased dramatically over the past 24 hours by virtually all of the models. The GFS and ECMWF are both currently insistent that the Saturday storm will be very imprssive, esp. in NorCal. The low center will be developing rapidly as it approaches the CA coast from the west, riding a powerful 180 kt jet with an exit region over central/northern CA. It currently appears that the low may undergo a period of rapid intensification as it approaches the coast on Saturday, bottoming out below 990 mb (per GFS) and below 980 mb (per ECMWF). Given that the low center will be passing directly over the San Francisco region, this is quite impressive. The benchmark for strong/damaging winds in NorCal from these types of systems is generally 995 mb, so this system certainly has the potential for strong/damaging winds (if the ECMWF is to be believed, rivaling the winds of the January storm). Intense heavy rain and embedded thunderstorm activity would also be a concern, but that would be secondary to the magnitude of the winds. Snow levels would be near to slightly below average–3000-4500 feet in the north. Given that this is a very new development, the forecast is liable (and even likely) to change quite a bit as we get closer to the event. I cannot say at this time what impact this storm will have on SoCal. At the moment, it looks like the focus will be on areas north of Santa Barbara, but again, this could change. It does appear that the pattern will begin to revert to a warmer and drier one after this weekend–recent GFS depictions of a very cold pattern have vanished altogether. Stay tuned, in any case
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115454
118. BahaHurican
11:55 PM GMT on February 18, 2008
115. HIEXPRESS 6:13 PM EST on February 18, 2008
Record Report

Statement as of 4:20 PM EST on February 18, 2008

... Record high temperature set at Melbourne...[FL]

The high temperature was 88 degrees at Melbourne today. This breaks
the old record high for this date of 85... set in 1976.



Geez. I thought for a second that was Australia, and I was thinking "that's kinda cool for the summer, isn't it?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725
117. hurricane23
11:20 PM GMT on February 18, 2008
Summer arrived in south florida weeks ago lol...
Member Since: May 14, 2006 Posts: 8 Comments: 13841
116. BahaHurican
11:17 PM GMT on February 18, 2008
Evening everybody,

I looked at some of the NRL IR pics of Ivan's approach to Madagascar. Would you believe that one small island on the east coast was in the eye for close to 3 hours!?!? The north end of that little island experienced the eyewall of Ivan for even longer . . .


Ivan getting ready to cross the Madegascar coast
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22725

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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