Giving thanks to the Hurricane Hunters and QuikSCAT scientists

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:54 PM GMT on November 21, 2007

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Everyone knows that flying into hurricanes is dangerous work. The NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft have flown a number of dangerous flights over the years, most recently in Hurricane Felix on September 2 this year. NOAA P-3 aircraft N42RF (affectionately called Kermit), penetrated a rapidly intensifying Hurricane Felix as it approached Category 5 intensity. The aircraft hit four G's of acceleration in both the up and down directions in Felix's eyewall. Regulations require a flight to be aborted at that level of turbulence, and Kermit returned to base. A detailed inspection of the aircraft the next day revealed no damage, and Kermit returned to service for the remainder of hurricane season.


Figure 1. A NOAA P-3 refuels in Cold Bay, Alaska (left) on its way to the Aleutian Islands to fly a mission in the 1987 Alaska Storms Program. Right: The two NOAA P-3's get de-iced at Brunswick Naval Air Station, Maine, as they prepare for a mission into a 'Noreaster during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) in 1989. Both photos taken by yours truly.

What is less appreciated is that these aircraft fly research missions into dangerous weather conditions year-round and world-wide, and some of the most dangerous flights have occurred far from the tropics. Earlier this year, Kermit experienced perhaps the most dangerous flight of its 31-year career. On February 9, the aircraft flew into an intense winter storm 500 miles east of Newfoundland. The mission was part of the Ocean Winds project, a study designed to test the accuracy of QuikSCAT satellite wind estimates in regions of high wind and heavy rain. Flying at 3,000 feet, the aircraft sampled the surface winds with its SFMR (Step Frequency Microwave Radiometer) and dropsondes. The flights were timed to coincide with an overhead pass of the QuikSCAT satellite, which also measured winds at the ocean surface. It was a bit of a rough ride, since the storm packed winds of 100-110 mph at flight level. Sea spray kicked up by the powerful winds reached all the way to flight level, coating the windshield with a thick white coating of salt. The windshield washer failed, leaving the windshield partially opaque. It was an unusually dry winter storm, and the rain showers needed to rinse the windshield clean were difficult to find.


Figure 2. QuikSCAT wind profile of the ocean surface at 21:22 GMT February 9, 2007, just before Kermit headed back to St. John's, Newfoundland.

After a successful 4-hour flight, the aircraft dropped its final dropsonde, and turned north to complete its final sampling run. Suddenly, crew members observed flames coming from the #3 engine, accompanied by an audible popping sound. "Fire on #3, flames, flames, flames!" came the cry over the on-board intercom system. The pilots and flight engineers immediately began an emergency shut down of the #3 engine. As they worked to shut down the engine, the ominous call, "Fire on #4!" came over the intercom. The pilot immediately began an emergency shut down of the #4 engine. With both engines on the right wing now shut down, the pilot cautiously ramped up power on the two engines on the left wing, turned the aircraft towards home base in St. Johns, Newfoundland, and attempted to climb. However, the aircraft was not able to climb on just two engines, and the pilot was forced to begin a gradual descent to 2600 feet. The pilot notified the crew to review their ditching placards, and word was send to air traffic control informing them of the emergency. Three tense minutes passed, as the crew attempted to figure out what had caused the multiple engine failures. Speculation centered on the unusually heavy accumulation of salt on the aircraft--but excessive salt had never been implicated in engine failures before. Then, the words they all dreaded, "Fire on #1!" burst out over the intercom. The flight engineer immediately pulled the emergency shutdown handle for the #1 engine, and Kermit began a 700 foot per minute descent towards the turbulent sea below.

The crew donned survival suits as the pilot issued a May-day distress call and prepared to ditch the aircraft. Beneath them, hurricane force winds blew over the night-shrouded North Atlantic waters. With waves easily reaching 20 feet, water temperatures near freezing, and 500 miles out at sea at night, prospects for survival were dim. Four minutes remained to restart one of the flamed-out engines, and the pilot called for an immediate restart of the #1 engine. As the flight engineer worked to comply, Kermit passed through a brief rain shower that washed considerable salt from the aircraft. The attempt to restart the #1 engine succeeded, and Kermit pulled out of its descent just 800 feet above the waves--one minute from impact.

The crew now worked to restart the failed #3 and #4 engines, while the plane slowly climbed away from the ocean surface. As they headed towards Newfoundland, the Canadian Air Force launched a search and rescue C-130 aircraft from Nova Scotia to intercept Kermit. Crews on the Hibernia and Terra Nova oil rigs located east of Newfoundland were alerted of the emergency, and stood by to help if necessary. Kermit's navigator continuously plotted vectors to the oil rigs at they flew home, in case a ditch near one of the rigs became necessary.

As they continued westward, the crew successfully restarted both the #3 and #4 engines, but at reduced power. Kermit climbed to a more comfortable altitude of 14,000 feet and made it uneventfully back to St. Johns. Fortunately, the engines were undamaged and perfectly operational after the salt was washed out, and the data collected during the mission was saved. According to the detailed NOAA Mishap Investigation Report posted on Chris Mooney's excellent blog, "Post flight inspection of engines revealed significant white build up on intakes, first stage compressors, and CIP probes of all four engines. Subjectively, the #2 engine appeared to be the worst coated of all engines. Aircraft fuselage and windows were also heavily coated." Salt build-up on the engines was determined to be the cause of the incident. The unusually dry nature of the storm prevented the salt from being washed off, and was probably part of the reason the engines failed on this flight, and not on previous flights.

I asked Dr. Jim McFadden, project manager of the Ocean Winds project, what happened. He was on the flight, and responded:

This event stumped everyone including the experts who spend a life-time studying sea salt and aerosols in the marine boundary layer. Six previous flights in similar conditions had resulted in nothing like this. But this one was different. It was flown over an ocean warmed by the Gulf Stream in a dry slot of cold Canadian air. Somehow that combination was the key to what could have been a disastrous flight. Fortunately, quick thinking and the flawless action of the crew brought about by excellent training got us home safely.

Last week in Washington D.C., the crew of Kermit was honored with the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal for successfully bringing home the aircraft. The crew members from NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center who were on the flight were:

LCDR Mark Nelson
LCDR Carl Newman
Joseph Klippel
LCDR Peter Siegel
LCDR Joseph Bishop
Tom Shepherd
James Barr
Terry Lynch
William Olney
James McFadden

QuikSCAT scientists Paul Chang and Rob Contreras were also present on the flight.

Separate Department of Commerce Gold and Silver Medals were also awarded last week for scientists involved in leading NOAA's operational use of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite to produce more accurate forecasts and warnings of marine and coastal weather:

Paul Chang
Hugh Cobb III (NWS)
Roger Edson (NWS)
James Franklin (NHC)
Richard Knabb (NHC)
Eugene Legg
Kevin Schrab (NWS)
Joseph Sienkiewicz (NWS)

A Gold Medal is defined as distinguished performance characterized by extraordinary, notable or prestigious contributions that impact the mission of the Department and/or one operating unit and which reflect favorably on the Department. Congratulations to all the awardees, and thanks for all that you do!

Jeff Masters

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605. ShenValleyFlyFish
3:35 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Sorry about that ;)
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
604. ShenValleyFlyFish
3:35 PM EST on November 26, 2007
569. LakeShadow 2:58 PM EST on November 26, 2007
That first snowfall the drivers are absolute MORONS!!! There's just no explaining some of the drivers out there. I love the SUV drivers that think they can drive fast on ice...Driving by a spun-out SUV always puts a little song in my heart
!572. Bonedog 3:02 PM EST on November 26, 2007
so true Lake. I smile as well :) Yes I know Im evil :>
Dad always taught me...
"Its four wheel drive NOT four wheel stop!"
585. Bonedog 3:20 PM EST on November 26, 2007
No figure 8's NE but alot of four line tracks through turns ;)
I amaze folks with my drifting capabilities ;)


LOL You northerners have no idea what it's like in a college town when we get the first VA snow of the year. My Dad who was from Canada use to get great glee in inviting Canadian folks new to the area over to watch them get stuck in our 1/4 mile lane. Temps around here rarely go below 20F which means snow is "wetter" than northern snows and packs down creating a situation similar to attempting to drive on wet ice. A little experience with our twisty hilly lane tended to wipe away smug looks and haughty comments on school closings. And then you have all the true southerners who've never even seen the white stuff before. Makes for a few chuckles if you don't have to be somewhere on time. Otherwise driving can be as hazardous to your heart as shoveling snow.

I blame some of the trouble to over-marketing by SUV companies and the advent of all weather tires. "Back in the day" only 4x4s were trucks or Jeeps and you either had to buy a separate set of snow tires or put on a set of chains. Tended to naturally select some of the folks out on the road nowadays out of the driving pool. Four wheel drive and modern tires can make you overconfident real quick. One of the best pieces of wisdom I've received was from an old timer after I bought my first 4x4 truck. "Son you're gonna love that truck but just remember 4 wheel drive doesn't mean you wouldn't get stuck. Just means you'll get stuck a lot worse in a lot worse places." Truer words were never spoken.
Member Since: September 9, 2007 Posts: 36 Comments: 4687
603. Weather456
5:37 PM AST on November 26, 2007
CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION....

The most active weather in the Caribbean lies in the Western portion where scattered moderate to strong convection lies from 10N-21N between 80W over Central America. This area continues to lie in a favorable jet entrance region upstream from an upper ridge axis extending northeastward from the Western Tip of Cuba to the Gulf of Venezuela.

It has been a real wet and windy day for the Eastern Caribbean all thanks to a high pressure north of the region. The high pressure ridge north of our region continues to produce fresh to occasionally strong northeast winds over the Eastern Caribbean. This flow is also advecting patches of cloudiness and showers over the islands, making for a wet and windy day. Small craft advisory remains in effect for waters across the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico/Virgin Isles due unfavorable marine conditions. QuikSCAT is working again and shows much Caribbean covered in near gale force winds. These winds are pushing 15-20 ft seas over the Southwest Caribbean especially along the Colombia Coast and under shower activity.

by W456
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
602. Weather456
3:37 PM AST on November 26, 2007
NORTHWEST ATLANTIC OCEAN WEST OF 40W....

There could not be a better day for marine activities over the Western Atlantic. As a cold front moves over the Central Atlantic, a 1034 mb ridge has built-in over the entire Southwest North Atlantic providing moderate to fresh anticyclonic flow from 55W to the East Coast. The wind flow south of ridge is also advecting scattered patches of low-level cloudiness with embedded showers over the area. Meanwhile, seas will remain modest with swells near 10ft. However, special caution should be advise near Atlantic coasts of Southern Cuba and Hispaniola where swells reach 15-20 ft due to pile-up of sea water.

by W456
Member Since: July 24, 2005 Posts: 407 Comments: 19076
601. Patrap
3:18 PM CST on November 26, 2007
The V.P. has a Bad B.P. ,so keep it on the Q.T.!

AP: Cheney Story Link
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128282
600. Bonedog
4:15 PM EST on November 26, 2007
now factor the plunging AO combined with the negative NAO and positive PNA during a moderate La Nina...

well you get the picture.. cold stormy winter for the eastern US
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
599. Bonedog
4:09 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
598. NEwxguy
9:09 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Don't want to hear that,but I was expecting a cold December so I'm ready.
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597. Bonedog
4:06 PM EST on November 26, 2007
the more negative the number the colder the eastern US gets is what it boils down too
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
596. NEwxguy
9:02 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
bonedog,what doesn that artic oscillation number mean.
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595. Bonedog
4:01 PM EST on November 26, 2007


postive phase left
negative phase right
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
594. flaboyinga
3:53 PM EST on November 26, 2007
You've got the picture.
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593. LakeShadow
8:46 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
no canals on either side of the road, either, LOL
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592. flaboyinga
3:41 PM EST on November 26, 2007
590. LakeShadow 3:36 PM EST on November 26, 2007
yeah, fla, its much more fun when you know the roads are icy, rather than when you get surprised by a nice big patch of black ice... Thats dangerous stuff!!!

Now if you give me a dirt road, no traffic and a strong pickem up truck, we can have a little fun. lol
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591. Bonedog
3:35 PM EST on November 26, 2007
wow the AO (artic occilation) is forcasted to bottom out first week of december to a -4 or lower. Haven't seen a number that low in any of the records.



Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
590. LakeShadow
8:33 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
yeah, fla, its much more fun when you know the roads are icy, rather than when you get surprised by a nice big patch of black ice... Thats dangerous stuff!!!
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589. Bonedog
3:30 PM EST on November 26, 2007
looks like the UK will be dealing with the Ohio Low by the weekend. The OPC charts are showing it as hurricane force on the 30th heading to the UK so figure Saturday or Sunday for them.
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
588. weatherboyfsu
8:23 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Good Afternoon,

The local weather peeps are not talking about anything exciting in the next week.....

000
FXUS62 KMLB 262000
AFDMLB

AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MELBOURNE FL
300 PM EST MON NOV 26 2007

.DISCUSSION...

NEAR RECORD HIGHS THIS AFTN UNDER DEEP S/SW FLOW AND SUFFICIENT
HEATING. SLUG OF MOISTURE IS LIFTING NORTH ACROSS SOUTH FLORIDA SO
COULD SEE ISOLD SHOWERS INTO THIS EVENING ACROSS SOUTHERN SECTIONS
LIFTING NORTH INTO CENTRAL SECTIONS.

COLD FRONT IS ADVANCING EAST INTO THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO AND
ACROSS THE FL PANHANDLE. BUT LOW PRESSURE IS LIFTING NE ACROSS THE
OH VALLEY AND UPPER JET WILL BE WEAKENING AS IT APPROACHES CENT FL
SO EXPECT CONVECTION ALONG FRONT TO WEAKEN ESP AFTER SUNSET.
BOUNDARY EXPECTED TO BE ENTERING OUR NORTHERN SECTIONS AROUND
DAYBREAK WITH MAINLY ISOLD SHOWERS ALONG AND AHEAD OF IT.

TUE...BOUNDARY EXPECTED TO WEAKEN AND STALL OVER CENT FL WITH SOME
COOLER TEMPS ACROSS NORTHERN SECTIONS BUT ABOVE NORMAL TEMPS
CONTINUING MOST AREAS DESPITE MORE CLOUDS THOUGH NOT AS WARM AS
TODAY. THERE WILL BE A SLIGHT CHANCE (20%) FOR SHOWERS MAINLY IN
THE AFTN FOCUSED ON WHERE THE BOUNDARY IS LOCATED DURING PEAK
HEATING.

TUE NIGHT-THU...ZONAL FLOW OVER EASTERN TWO THIRDS OF THE COUNTRY
AND DISSIPATING FRONTAL BOUNDARY OVER SOUTHERN HALF OF FLORIDA
RESULTS IN A LOW POP FORECAST THIS TIME PERIOD. FLOW VEERS FROM
NORTH TO NORTHEAST BY WED MORNING AND STAYS ONSHORE THROUGH AT LEAST
THU. STABLE AND CAPPED MARINE AIR MASS PRODUCES FEW SHOWERS OR
SPRINKLES AS MARINE STRATOCU COMES ASHORE AND PUSHES INLAND.
CHANCES OF LATE NIGHT COASTAL CONVERGENCE SHOWERS APPEAR LOW WITH
WIND SPEEDS 10 KNOTS OR LESS OVER SOUTHERN WATERS. LATE NIGHT FOG
OVER THE NORTHERN AND INTERIOR LOCATIONS WILL HAVE TO BE MONITORED
AS MOS GUIDANCE IS SUGGESTING PATCHES OF FOG FROM SANFORD WESTWARD
THU MORNING.

FRI-WEEKEND-MON...LATEST ECMWF AND GFS TELL SIMILAR STORY WITH HIGH
PRESSURE CENTERED WELL NORTH OF FLORIDA BEING THE DOMINATE WEATHER
FEATURE. ONSHORE FLOW THROUGH THE WEEKEND AND MON WILL BRING A
STABLE MARINE AIR MASS ACROSS CENTRAL FLORIDA AND LOW...LESS THAN 20
PERCENT POP...EACH DAY. CAN NOT RULE OUT A FEW LATE NIGHT COASTAL
CONVERGENCE SHOWER OR A FEW LIGHT SPRINKLE ALONG THE COAST FROM
MARINE STRATOCU COMING ASHORE. FEEL THAT THESE EVENTS ARE MORE
SUITED TO BE HANDLED ON THE "TAC MET" OR SHORT TERM FORECASTER`S
SIDE EACH DAY THEREFORE WILL KEEP A DRY FORECAST.



The area in the very western Caribbean looks a little spunky. Wouldnt surprise me if something there could grow and ride up the stationary front.........
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587. hcubed
2:24 PM CST on November 26, 2007
Don't know if this has shown up here yet or not.

Link

Dr Mann (of AGW fame), has created a new model to "predict" the past's undercount for huricanes.

I assume this was needed so the future seasons can be accurately listed as "worst since the 1800's".
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586. Bonedog
3:20 PM EST on November 26, 2007
yea Fla I bet it did :o
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
585. Bonedog
3:18 PM EST on November 26, 2007
No figure 8's NE but alot of four line tracks through turns ;)

I amaze folks with my drifting capabilities ;)
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
584. flaboyinga
3:09 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Lake, I got broke of that "fun" by a large patch of black ice and a narrow road with a canal on each side of it. Once I stopped sliding backwards and got turned around again, I declined a repeat performance.
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583. NEwxguy
8:14 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
so you are the people I see the car tracks in the morning making figure 8s.
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582. Bonedog
3:10 PM EST on November 26, 2007
no cch I dont see it in the other models. I do see a lowering of the high pressure over that area but no cyclonic development.
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
581. Bonedog
3:09 PM EST on November 26, 2007
LOL Lake. Yea I too have been known to ralley drive the backroads by me on a winters night ;)
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
580. cchsweatherman
8:04 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Hey Bonedog, if you take a look at the GFS, UKMET and NOGAPS, it would appear as if they do hint at some small area of vorticity in this area. Do you see what I am seeing in these models? I use the FSU model page.
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579. flaboyinga
3:07 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Thanks cchs, I was too lazy to check them out myself.
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578. LakeShadow
8:06 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
The best is driving around in a storm that hits later at night and there is nobody on the roads... Thats some fun driving. I fishtail all the way home! Wheeeeeeee!
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577. Bonedog
3:07 PM EST on November 26, 2007
cch which other models? I dont see any haveing anything in the catl at all.
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
576. flaboyinga
3:04 PM EST on November 26, 2007
By the way, saying the CMC has been "agressive" qualifies you as a master of understatement.lol
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575. Bonedog
3:03 PM EST on November 26, 2007
wind shear is 40+ knots throughout the are with pockets of 60knts and shear is forcatsed to increase.

Dont think it will be anything more then an area of Lower pressure with an atendant trough maybe.
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
574. cchsweatherman
7:59 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Taking a look at the other major models, they all do show some disturbance in the general vicinity of where the CMC shows a weak subtropical/tropical storm developing. I would not say there is model support, but it does show that there is a good chance there will be some disturbed weather developing in the Central Atlantic during the weekend.
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573. LakeShadow
7:59 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Thats a whole lotta rain falling on a very dry SE... any floods or anything happening there? no flood warnings posted...
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572. Bonedog
3:01 PM EST on November 26, 2007
so true Lake. I smile as well :) Yes I know Im evil :>

Dad always taught me...

"Its four wheel drive NOT four wheel stop!"
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
571. Bonedog
2:59 PM EST on November 26, 2007
no just the CMC spins something up. Once againt he lovely CMC makes a storm out of a thunderstorm ;)

Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
570. flaboyinga
2:55 PM EST on November 26, 2007
I asked earlier if any of the other models supported this forecast. Does anyone remember seeing a storm on another model?
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569. LakeShadow
7:55 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
That first snowfall the drivers are absolute MORONS!!! There's just no explaining some of the drivers out there. I love the SUV drivers that think they can drive fast on ice...Driving by a spun-out SUV always puts a little song in my heart!
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568. cchsweatherman
7:52 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
I do not know if you read eaglesrock's comments, but the CMC has continued to show some subtropical/tropical storm formation occuring in the Central Atlantic for the past four or five runs, I believe. I am fully aware of the fact that the CMC model has been very aggressive this season forming systems, but it should be made noteworthy that this has been a continuous output by the model for over the past 24 hours. I will be watching this area since we all know storms have formed outside hurricane season, which ends Friday.
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567. hurricane24
7:53 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
where is masters new blog?
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566. flaboyinga
2:49 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Bone, we use to get them in Orlando in the summertime. We'd go for a week or so without rain and the oill, etc. would build up on the roads and the get a little shower and people would go ice skating in their cars. It kept the fire/rescue busy from time to time. The one thing that got me was the black ice. It spun me around a few times in the Norfolk Va area in the wintertime.
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565. Bonedog
2:46 PM EST on November 26, 2007
yea a real good snow storm will surprise most folks. Heck it surprises folks that live in the snow regions. Its amazing that at the first sign of a flake on the road people seem to turn their brains off. Well at least more then usual.

I am convinced that there is a secret society of bad winter drivers that only come out on the roads when they are snow or ice covered. And for some odd reason they target the route I take to and from work LOL
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
564. flaboyinga
2:47 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Yeah, and it's cold out there on them there roads, too.
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563. LakeShadow
7:46 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
probably does something for plow-guy's headaches, too!
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562. Bonedog
2:45 PM EST on November 26, 2007
your welcome Lake.

saves me many headaches during the winter season.
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
561. flaboyinga
2:42 PM EST on November 26, 2007
556. Bonedog 2:39 PM EST on November 26, 2007
LOL Fla yea winds and snows off the Lakes can be brutal


I think that was the first real snow I'd ever seen. (All we had was a frost now and then for the first 17 years of my life, then wow.)
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560. LakeShadow
7:43 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
Yes, I can see where it would be, especially if he was sampling it while plowing snow.lol
I think they already have "sampled" stuff anyways. LOL!
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559. LakeShadow
7:40 PM GMT on November 26, 2007
good tip, bone thanks! :0)
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558. Bonedog
2:42 PM EST on November 26, 2007
LOL Fla
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
557. flaboyinga
2:39 PM EST on November 26, 2007
555. Bonedog 2:39 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Oh yea the lovely plow driver.

Found a great solution to him... bottle of Johny at the first storm. After that its my neighbors problem :) *evil grin*


Yes, I can see where it would be, especially if he was sampling it while plowing snow.lol
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556. Bonedog
2:39 PM EST on November 26, 2007
LOL Fla yea winds and snows off the Lakes can be brutal
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418
555. Bonedog
2:35 PM EST on November 26, 2007
Oh yea the lovely plow driver.

Found a great solution to him... bottle of Johny at the first storm. After that its my neighbors problem :) *evil grin*
Member Since: July 14, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 7418

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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