Beryl hits Nantucket

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:14 PM GMT on July 21, 2006

Share this Blog
0
+

Tropical Storm Beryl moved rapidly over Nantucket Island, Massachusetts this morning, bringing gusty winds and heavy rain, but little damage. Seas reached 19 feet offshore Nantucket this morning, and large pounding waves of six to ten feet will cause minor beach erosion problems for the remainder of the day. The peak wind this morning measured at Nantucket Airport was 33 mph, gusting to 44 mph. The pressure bottomed out at 1001 mb at 3am. The Nantucket Shoals buoy reported peak 10-minute average winds of 41 mph with a gust to 56 mph. The heaviest rain stayed offshore, and only about an inch of rain fell on Nantucket. Beryl was a typical July tropical storm--a weak system good for testing our preparedness for when the real action starts in August.


Figure 1. Total rainfall from Beryl estimated from the Boston radar.

Beryl missed mainland Massachusetts, and is now on its way to a landfall in Nova Scotia. The storm is well on its way toward becoming a regular extratropical storm, and should have only a minor impact on Canada. Beryl is the first July tropical storm to hit New England since Tropical Storm Bertha of 1996.

Elsewhere in the tropics
There are no other disturbed areas of weather in the tropical Atlantic worthy of mention today. There are indications that the region between Africa and the Lesser Antilles Islands may become more favorable for tropical storm formation next week, though. There is less Saharan dust pushing off the coast of Africa, and both the GFS and Canadian models are suggesting a tropical storm could form by the middle of next week off the coast of Africa. However, there will still be a lot of wind shear present, and the chances of a significant storm developing and holding together are questionable. The basic weather pattern we've seen all of June and July shows no sign of changing, and significant hurricane activity appears likely to hold off until the usual time we're used to--early August.

I'll be back with an update Saturday.
Jeff Masters

TS Beryl - 1 (LRandyB)
Shot of the ocean surface off the coast of NY asa we flew TS Beryl today (7/20)
TS Beryl - 1
TS Beryl - 4 (LRandyB)
We were treated to this view of a double rainbow outside the plane as we passed through some light rain outbound from the storm.
TS Beryl - 4
TS Beryl - 5 (LRandyB)
After spending 6 hours in the storm, we made our way home toward the setting sun. The flight was 12.6 hours total and we made 4 passes through the center of Beryl, which proved to not be a very impressive storm.
TS Beryl - 5

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 911 - 861

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

911. IKE
2:23 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Dr. M has a new blog.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37860
910. jus991
2:19 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
then camille would be the strongest hurricane to make landfall with 190mph...if it made landfall like that,i may be wrong?
909. jus991
2:16 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
did'nt camille make landfall as 190mph?
908. jus991
2:15 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
now, this is way cooler than Daniel and isabelLink
907. Skyepony (Mod)
2:12 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Ya'll are forgetting Labor Day Hurricane of 1935

The Labor Day Hurricane was a very compact, intense hurricane that formed in the North Atlantic during August 1935. It remains the strongest hurricane on record to have struck the United States, and was for five decades the strongest Atlantic hurricane ever.

892mb at landfall(I've heard stories it was less), windspeed is still debatable.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 209 Comments: 39100
906. jus991
2:08 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
you can see a nice spin on emiliaLink
905. jus991
2:06 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
good mornin', anything interesting to be watching?
904. Skyepony (Mod)
2:05 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Researchers Link Wildfires, Climate Change

Scientists worldwide are watching temperatures rise, the land turn dry and vast forests go up in flames. In the Siberian taiga and Canadian Rockies, in southern California and Australia, researchers find growing evidence tying an upsurge in wildfires to climate change, an impact long predicted by global-warming forecasters

MrPR~ Last year more than once (worldwide) when a hurricane passed over a volcano it exploded, I think Stan was one. Not much studies have been done. This phenominoen was deemed coincidence in most circles. One guy is studying hurricanes causing earthquakes (he has a peer reviewed paper online somewhere)...which might help set off a volcano? But when the 'canes get involved with the volcanos the high mountain tends to tear them apart. Though it seems in the case of the Central America, NPR said it rained mud & since the volcano had been somewhat active recently, with the ash already on the ground, villages were wiped out by mud slides.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 209 Comments: 39100
903. SAINTHURRIFAN
1:52 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
very good sj i have work to do so ill give the awnser i hate secrets never knew one to be kept
strongest to weakest 1]BY FAR AND AWAY camille 190 2} andrew 160 i still have doubts lol
3) hugo 135 4) and the surprise fredrick 132 3or 4 take your pick 5) katrina 125 if you believe a storm at 923 mb
is only 125 mph lol. also this info comes from the weather office at keesler afb we know who is stationed there. also
where i get my weather interest from family friend who is a hurricane
hunter and one retiered hunter they also laugh at the nhc for downgrading
katrina after the reports they sent them before landfall and what they saw after. the thinking here on the ms coast is the nhc or jokefield or in cahoots
with the insurance companies who refuse to pay claims saying it was all flood winds were not as strong i guess we should see if mayfields boys have some nice new toys in the last year.
im sure i will catch grief from some of the nhc fan worshippers although come to the ms coast and see for yourself.
Member Since: August 20, 2005 Posts: 5 Comments: 709
902. StormJunkie
1:41 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Sorry ya'll.....

CORRECTION

Only three of the top ten were in the last 20 years, and only one in the last 10 years.
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16874
901. StormJunkie
1:39 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Interesting to note on that question saint, that out of the top 10 there were only two in the last 20 years, and only one in the past 15.




Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16874
900. mrpuertorico
1:29 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Ok just read it thanksskyepony it was intersting but it still hasn't really answered my question h i have been surfing the net aswell and still have yet to find something that acctually can explain or at least theorize what would happen to tropical systems say hurricanes that absorb these materials could they get worse like more lighting or would it diminish a hurricane or tropical system
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
899. SAINTHURRIFAN
1:27 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
in the spirit of 456 trivia for the day what are the 5
at landfall strongest hurricanes to hit the US?
at land fall not in the open waters are latin ameriaca.
also for all the constant fla stormm reminiscing only one of those hit fla.
and the wave off africa look at the wv image for central atl noting but dry
air ahead of it lol. system off bahams and fla looks to have fizzeled. awnser to the trivia question i think will
suprise some, of course it needs to be in the 35 and older group lol
Member Since: August 20, 2005 Posts: 5 Comments: 709
897. Skyepony (Mod)
1:19 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
There building some of those houses around here, but they used steal sheets for forms. Concrete truck comes in & pours the walls. Very energy efficent. The ones close by here they are building, they skipped the concrete roof, though there is a house on State Road 3 (east side) that is all concrete. For the locals~ don't use Majestic builders on the concrete house building, slow & managed to get some leans on atleast one house by shody sub-contracting.

MrPuertoRico~ You see the volcano ash, hurricane thing I left ya at the beginning of this thread?
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 209 Comments: 39100
896. mrpuertorico
1:16 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
catch a storm for me happy hunting
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
895. guygee
1:14 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - Thanks for the message, I'll be interested to check it out.

I am off to take advantage of the morning, because the storms will be blowing my way this afternoon. Have a good day!
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
894. mrpuertorico
1:13 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Yeah it was like that here before hugo after though all those wooden fram houses where gone now these beautiful concrete manshions are there...sigh i want one :(
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
893. guygee
1:11 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - I was talking about the wood frame buildings in certain areas of the US mainland...believe it or not, it is not uncommon to see woodframe houses right on the beach in many areas.
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
892. mrpuertorico
1:08 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
no the lol the wood frames are just planks of wood for the setting of the concrete they get taken off once its dry what your left with is a masive solid concrete wall reinforced
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
891. mrpuertorico
1:06 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
i dind't want to get introuble for posting a my company's website in the blog
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
890. guygee
1:05 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - Thanks for the explanation. Doesn't sound like it would be much more expensive either. But I am sure the developers would use wood frames even here if the local government didn't force them with building codes to use cinderblocks, as is evident in many other coastal counties that allow for wood-frame houses on the beach. If I was building from scratch I would go with the steel-reinforced concrete. Maybe if landfalling hurricanes increase on the mainland the insurance lobbyists will force reform in building codes - but then they would have to fight the developer lobbyists - that is how the government seems to work.
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
889. mrpuertorico
1:04 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
guygee sent you a message so you can see the link to my website lots of my pr homes so you can see what i am saying better
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
888. thelmores
1:03 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
"upper-level trough—(Also called upper trough, upper-air trough, high-level trough, trough aloft.) A pressure trough existing in the upper air.
This term is sometimes restricted to those troughs that are much more pronounced aloft than near the earth's surface. These troughs are often described as either short-wave or long-wave features."

"short wave—1. (Or minor wave.) With regard to atmospheric circulation, a progressive wave in the horizontal pattern of air motion with dimensions of cyclonic scale, as distinguished from a long wave.
A short wave moves in the same direction as that of the prevailing basic current through the troposphere. The angular wavenumber of short waves ranges between eight and twenty. See cyclone wave. 2. A wave with a relatively short wavelength and period.
For ocean wind waves, this usually means waves with periods shorter than about 60 s."

"long wave—1. (Or major wave; also called planetary wave.) With regard to atmospheric circulation, a wave in the major belt of westerlies that is characterized by large length and significant amplitude.
The wave length is typically longer than that of the rapidly moving individual cyclonic and anticyclonic disturbances of the lower troposphere. The angular wavenumber of long waves is generally taken to be from 1 to 5. Compare short wave; see Rossby wave. 2. (Also called shallow water wave.) A wave with a relatively long wave length and period.
For ocean waves, this is typically a wave of period greater than about 10 s and wave length greater than about 150 m."

for those inquiring minds that want to know! ;)

when somebody figures out what it all means, let me know! :D
Member Since: September 8, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3805
886. mrpuertorico
12:59 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Ah and some other builders here ( and by the way i am a licensed home inspector) make a cast out of wood planks and rebarb and just poor the concrete into it and vuala! a wall!
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
885. thelmores
12:58 PM GMT on July 22, 2006


according to Dr. Lyons, this feature is an UL trough, and tropical formation associated with this feature is "not expected"....

course "Beryl" was "not expected" either! LOL
Member Since: September 8, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3805
884. mrpuertorico
12:52 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
we don't build with blocks our walls are solid conrete my roof my walls stairs everything but the front door and windows lol what they do here is take blocks reiforced with rebarb wrapped in concrete that is the average house in pr our roofs and this is critical are made of te same material as our houses basically we live in solid concrete blocks reinforced with steel
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
883. mrpuertorico
12:46 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
ok i am back sorry lost power (happens alot around here)
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
881. flwatergal
12:37 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Morning All,

Just stopped by to see what was being said about Florida & the GOM. We had some rain yesterday but its a sunny day in the Tampa area this morning.

Taking my two little ones to meet the whole fam damily for breakfast. :)

Great discussions last night.

Drewl, looks like you were on here for awhile by yourself. Thanks for the links and thoughts. :)
880. StormJunkie
12:28 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Morning all

Seafarer, don't know if you saw my post about Hugo last night, but I was just up the road form you.

Anywho, everything looks pretty quite out there today including the forecast models :)

There is still some slite chance of development with the area in the Bahamas, but very unlikely.

Catch ya'll later
StormJunkie.com
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16874
879. turtlehurricane
12:19 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
Hurricane Warning


I have updated about Hurricane Daniel, newly formed tropical storm Emilia, and Typhoon Kamei on hurricane warning.
Member Since: July 22, 2005 Posts: 227 Comments: 469
878. guygee
12:07 PM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - That is interesting information about the ash causing excess lightning and storms. Silicates are not hygroscopic, so maybe the ash creates a dry layer that gets broken by passing over the elevation of PR, causing more severe storms than the usual tropical rain type storms. I know even here in Florida when there is a dry layer above and the convection pops up the storms tend to be more severe. Maybe one of the MET types here could expound on that further...
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
877. guygee
11:53 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - I saw the results of an F5 tornado that passed over a strip mall made of cinderblocks - the result was a big pile of cinderblocks, nothing left standing at all. Across the street there was a small historical home that was built out of thick native rock - it survived. Down the hill a bit there was a neighborhood of wood frame homes, many people died there.

Steel reinforced concrete sounds like the way to go for the walls, but what do you do for your roof?
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
876. mrpuertorico
11:46 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
thanks guygee heres a little first hand experience with the monserat volcano and please go look at your maps for those who don't know how far monserat is from pr, when the wind is just right the trade winds carry clouds laden with ash (and by the way ash is made up of silcates aka glass particles along with other minerals) and these clouds can produce hazerdous weather conditions large amounts of lighting and copius amounts of rain. When the rain stops you ussually left with a layer of volcanic dust all over everything. I just wonder what these sylcates and other particles would do if a hurricane went right over the volcano or with in the path of its plume and keep in mind volcanoes can spew out millions of tons of material evryday!
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
875. seafarer459
11:36 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
Good morning all,
I see the Bahamas are looking interesting today.Can't wait to see what the afternoon brings,with the heating of the atmosphere.
Member Since: July 16, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 515
874. guygee
11:33 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
mrpuertorico - I saw the sulfates showing up on the NAAP aerosol concentration maps a couple of days ago, I was wondering what was causing that. At the time I hadn't heard of the eruption.

There is a theory that increased aerosol concentrations (including sulfate particles from volcanic eruptions) could provide an excess of condensation nuclei, making the cloud droplets smaller in clouds and thereby possibly supressing rain to some extent. Sulfate and sea salt particles are hygroscopic and do not suppress cloud formation like dust does. I believe that volcanic ash is usually made up of bigger particles and does not affect cloud formation much, but instead more readily falls out of the atmosphere. The affect of aerosols in the troposphere on weather and cloud formation is still not completely understood, and is an active area of research.
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
872. thelmores
11:19 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
BOC

Station 42055 - Bay of Campeche
Atmospheric Pressure (PRES): 29.89 in
(PTDY): -0.02 in ( Falling )

can somebody send some "seagulls" down to the BOC and check this out! :) possible moisture for s. texas???? it may be too close to the coast for much....

we may also have to send some gulls down to Bahammas...... pressures seem to be dropping "a little" there as well.....

these seem to be the area's of interest today..... will also be interesting to see if we get a big "flare-up" again today in s.fla.......


Member Since: September 8, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3805
871. mrpuertorico
11:14 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
Well as for building better homes you guys in the states NEED TO STOP BUILDING HOUSES OUT OF PAPER here in PR we build with concrete and tempered glass no jimpson board no plaster walls pure concrete
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
870. ricderr
11:10 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
First of all...the education you deserve irks me....makes it sound that you are owed something..in regards to education..it should be what you put into it...i'm the first college graad in my family...i could only see one choice....naval academy..and at the age of 14...i found out what would give me the chance to get in and busted my butt to accomplish it..i've traveled this world through the navy..and if there is a better place to live..with as much oppurtunity as we have here..i have not seen it..i've a son with a berkeley degree in international banking...working in hong kong...who tells me how many wealthy and influential people...strive to put there children in american schools..to say that eastern education is pure..must mean..that most of the world...doesn't have the insight that you have
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22275
869. guygee
11:09 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
Randrewl - A amjority of the student Masters and Ph.D. applications to U.S. universities in the science and engineering disciplines come from China and India these days. That might be partly because they want into the U.S., but some of them do go back after they get their degrees.

As for designing a home that can withstand 200 mph winds, why not? It doesn't sound like a very difficult engineering problem, if you don't mind your house looking like a military bunker (which are engineered to withstand high pressure and radiation from blasts). I am sure it would cost a pretty penny or two, though.
Member Since: September 16, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3188
868. mrpuertorico
11:03 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
well i have a brain teaser for you guys yesterday i asked about how a volcano (monserat in this case) could effect a developing tropical system or a hurricane if it were to pass over it or come in contact with its plume
Member Since: July 10, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 833
866. ricderr
11:00 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
talk about useless theories
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22275
865. ricderr
11:00 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
have you been to China?...seen what they teach?...try north vietnam...why is it that most people that have the means...will send their children to american universites?...
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22275
864. ricderr
10:59 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
what?...ran.....you might try traveling before you say that
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22275
861. ricderr
10:56 AM GMT on July 22, 2006
western?....hmmm...there's recognized geographical types of curriculum?......please expound
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22275

Viewing: 911 - 861

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
30 °F
Overcast