Philippines' First Typhoon Since Haiyan Approaching

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:20 PM GMT on July 14, 2014

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The Philippines Islands are bracing for the impact of Typhoon Rammasun, the islands' first typhoon since the devastating strike by Category 5 Super Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013. Haiyan was the deadliest and most expensive natural disaster in Philippines history. Fortunately, Rammasun is much weaker--a mere Category 1 storm. Top winds were 85 mph (1-minute average from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center), and the central pressure was 975 mb (as rated by the Japan Meteorological Agency) at 8 am EDT on Monday morning--a far cry from the incredible 195 mph sustained winds and central pressure of 895 mb of Haiyan at its peak. Rammasun is intensifying, though. Satellite loops on Monday morning showed a steady increase in the intensity and areal coverage of the typhoon's heavy thunderstorms. With wind shear a light 5 - 10 knots and Sea Surface Temperatures a very warm 30°C, further intensification is likely until landfall occurs. Philippines radar showed the outer spiral bands of Rammasun were already affecting Samar Island, where Haiyan initially made landfall. The core of Rammasun will pass north of Samar Island and strike the main Philippines island of Luzon, with the center passing very near the capital of Manila early Wednesday (local time). The main concern will be flash flooding and mudslides over Luzon and Samar, but wind damage also has the potential to be considerable, since the typhoon is passing over the most heavily populated part of Luzon.

After crossing Luzon, Rammasun will have the opportunity to re-strengthen over the South China Sea before making a second landfall in China near Hainan Island on Friday. Our two top track models, the GFS and European, predict a landfall in China between 03 - 12 UTC on Friday.


Figure 1. Rainfall rate of Typhoon Rammasun as estimated by a microwave sounding instrument on NOAA's F-18 polar orbiting satellite at 6:44 am EDT Monday July 14, 2014. Rainfall rates in excess of 1"/hour (orange colors) were indicated in the northern eyewall of the typhoon. Image credit: Navy Research Lab, Monterey.

Extreme heat in Western Canada, unusual coolness in Midwest U.S.
The remnants of Super Typhoon Neoguri, which pushed northeastwards into Alaska after the storm hit Japan last week, set in motion a chain-reaction set of events that has dramatically altered the path of the jet stream and affected weather patterns across the entire Northern Hemisphere. Neoguri caused an acceleration of the North Pacific jet stream, which amplified a trough low pressure over Alaska, causing a ripple effect in the jet stream over western North America, where a strong ridge of high pressure developed. The ridge helped push temperatures as high as 106°F (41.1°C) in British Columbia on Sunday. A compensating strong trough of low pressure formed over the Midwest U.S., and that trough is now pumping cool, polar air southwards into the Upper Midwest. The high temperature in Minneapolis on Monday is predicted to be in the low 60s, about 15°F below average. This jet stream pattern is similar to the nasty "Polar Vortex" pattern that set up during the winter of 2014 over North America, but calling it the polar vortex in this case is not technically correct.


Figure 2. Forecast for the departure of surface temperature from average for 5 pm EDT July 14, 2014, as predicted by the GFS model at 00 UTC July 14, 2014. A strong trough of low pressure is predicted to bring high temperatures much below average over portions of Minnesota and Wisconsin, while much above average temperatures are predicted over much of British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. Data/image obtained using Climate Reanalyzer™ (http://cci-reanalyzer.org), Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine.

Quiet in the Atlantic
None of the reliable models for predicting genesis of Atlantic tropical cyclones is predicting development over the next five days, and there are no threat areas to discuss. The tropical Atlantic is dominated by dry air and high wind shear, and SSTs are 0.2°C below average in the Hurricane Main Development region between the coast of Africa and Central America, between 10°N - 20°N. If we get another tropical storm this month, the most likely area for formation would be off the Southeast U.S. coast or in the Gulf of Mexico.

Jeff Masters

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459. Caimito
4:09 AM GMT on July 16, 2014
At this time there are 5 fatalities. Although this may increase, the evacuation of 76,000 families certainly contributed to this low number
Member Since: April 22, 2012 Posts: 1 Comments: 27
458. Caimito
2:40 AM GMT on July 16, 2014
Quoting 449. MAweatherboy1:

The new 15z JTWC warning upped Rammasun's winds to 110kts. I wonder what they think the peak was then, it certainly isn't at peak intensity now because of land disruption.



They also forecast it to get even stronger in the South China Sea, up to 120kts, before its second landfall. We'll have to see how badly the land interaction now ends up hurting it. If it makes out alright, and so far it is, that could certainly be attainable.
Rammasun did not really pick up until close to southern Luzon, being fed by the higher water temperatures. The landmass there did not slow it down at first, probably because it is not much of a landmass. The peninsula of southern Luzon is very narrow, and it was not until it met the landmass further into the island that it slowed more significantly.
It moved across Luzon fairly quickly, holding on to a lot of it's strength going back out to sea to start building again. It is expected to go back to at least CAT 3 before making second landfall at Hainan, China on Friday morning.
Member Since: April 22, 2012 Posts: 1 Comments: 27
457. hydrus
7:29 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Amazingly intact system..
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
456. LargoFl
7:16 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Blog for our Florida weather........................................... ...................................Link
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39225
455. ZacWeatherKidUK
4:00 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
.
Member Since: December 27, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 179
454. georgevandenberghe
3:19 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting EricGreen:


What is "normal", that is, what period was used to compute your data. Does your data set include 1816, the Year Without A Summer?

Both China and India have dramatically increased their burning of coal, resulting in large increases in emissions of both sulfur dioxide and carbon soot. The resulting "Human Volcano" is likely to be offsetting some of the warming from humanity's emissions of CO2. That is to say, the steady emissions may be having an combined impact no different than that of single, large volcanic eruptions which can boost sulfate into the stratosphere, where it is slowly removed over a period of years.


Although 1816 was called the year without a summer growing conditions were okay MOST of the time. What made it so bad was markedly stronger than normal cold outbreaks intespersed with longer periods of typical summer weather. The cold outbreaks caused freezes in extensive areas that normally grew crops. The cold outbreaks caused summer temperatures to average well below normal but not so cold
that summer crops could not get sufficient growing degree day accumulations in the extensive regions that did not quite freeze. Southeast Canada, near Quebec as well as much of New England reported good crop prospects until an early and abnormally severe frost in September, a continuation of the abnormally severe cold outbreaks, wiped out large areas that had survived the summer. To get to that point though required a summer without frost.

A similar but less severe analog occurred in 1992.


The difference between human emissions and volcanic eruptions is that sulfates from the former don't reach the stratosphere and there remain with a half life of about a year. The human volcano hypothesis was examined in the 70s and did have some merit but has been overwhelmed by greenhouse gas releases since, combined with a reduction in particulate emissions by first world countries.
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 18 Comments: 1826
453. jpsb
3:08 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 428. georgevandenberghe:



Cold fronts get to the Gulf Coast most Julys but are little more than weak windshift lines by the time they get there. Some years a real, can't deny it cold front does cross the Gulf Coast and drying and slight cooling is noticable. Cold fronts make it to the upper south most summers several times a month.

This cool outbreak in 2014 will set a few records but has a lot of precedents, in particular July 1975. Weather watchers need to remember that "rare" is not the same as either "unique" or "never"


I thought this an interesting topic so I researched and found this

A ten year study counted 9 cold fronts reaching the GoM in July. So I say you are correct in saying it is not "rare". Hoping this one reaches me on the Texas Gulf Coast.
Member Since: June 30, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1193
452. boltdwright
2:56 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 366. weathermanwannabe:

Good Morning.  While not subject to development, SAL has backed-off a little bit along the Atlantic ITCZ and has allowed a few waves to keep their composure while crossing the Atlantic.  Good example of what happens going into August when the SAL lifts just above the 10N mark allowing some of the waves to form into tropical depressions during the crossing.  You will note from the image below that while NW Africa remains pretty dry at the moment, it is a little greener this week to the East of the Cape Verde islands:

 


I've noticed a few more clouds / showers over the Saharan the past few days, perhaps this has weakened the SAL. I'm not too read up on the correlation between SAL and N. Saharan precipitation.
Member Since: March 1, 2009 Posts: 5 Comments: 212
451. islander101010
2:54 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
waiting to see what happens here. polar vortex vrs. 90+ c. florida heat.
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 4731
450. Chucktown
2:45 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 438. sar2401:

That was not the most coherent explanation of a cold front I've ever seen. However, the media just loves the "polar vortex" and they're not going to let it die. Any temperatures below normal will be caused by a "polar vortex" just like they always have been except we didn't call it a "polar vortex". Cold front just doesn't sound very ominous.


I just don't agree with CBS paying a physicist to explain the weather. With all the meteorologists available that work for their network and affiliates, why would you do that. Last time I checked, Bri Wi always goes to TWC for any weather explanation or forecast. NBC of course owns TWC, so why wouldn't you use your own trusted sources. On top of that, Dr. Kaku is dead wrong about the reasoning for the cool air, and no it's not like a tornado.
Member Since: August 27, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1770
449. MAweatherboy1
2:44 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
The new 15z JTWC warning upped Rammasun's winds to 110kts. I wonder what they think the peak was then, it certainly isn't at peak intensity now because of land disruption.



They also forecast it to get even stronger in the South China Sea, up to 120kts, before its second landfall. We'll have to see how badly the land interaction now ends up hurting it. If it makes out alright, and so far it is, that could certainly be attainable.
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 83 Comments: 7837
448. MahFL
2:44 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 438. sar2401:


.. However, the media just loves the "polar vortex" ...

Actually JAX NWS is using the term...
"THIS EVENING IS WHEN IT GETS MORE INTERESTING AS THE...WELL
ADVERTISED POLAR VORTEX...DROPS SOUTHWARD IT IS PUSHING A PRETTY
IMPRESSIVE SUMMERTIME COLD FRONT AHEAD OF IT."
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
447. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
2:43 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
446. TylerStanfield
2:43 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 403. CybrTeddy:



I agree with that sentiment, especially for a storm with a tropical origin.

I'd tend to agree that there is a low probability that we will see tropical cyclone of tropical origin in the Atlantic before the month is over. Though, I do see the potential for perhaps a quick spin up over the next 15 days. The GFS and GEM foresee a trough split to occur off the coast of North Carolina and head up the coast in about 7 to 8 days. The models are beginning to hint at a more favorable environment coupled with more potent tropical waves will allow for us to begin to see more areas of interest and the potential for the formation of a storm as we get into August.
Member Since: June 2, 2013 Posts: 8 Comments: 1347
445. cytochromeC
2:43 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 422. Chucktown:

I just know where to begin with this. Nothing like a physicist explaining weather. Maybe this means I can be a surgeon with no education and go operate on someone. First Bill Nye, now this alarmist. SMH !!

Link


You must be one of those climate optimists! Link
Member Since: June 17, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 42
444. hydrus
2:43 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
443. opal92nwf
2:42 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Probably the most humid and tropical airmass I've experienced thus far this year.
Member Since: May 12, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 2707
442. EricGreen
2:42 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 423. whitewabit:

51.2 degrees recorded for the low on my temperature gauge this morning here in Central Illinois ..
highs today are near what our normal lows would be here the middle of July !!


What is "normal", that is, what period was used to compute your data. Does your data set include 1816, the Year Without A Summer?

Both China and India have dramatically increased their burning of coal, resulting in large increases in emissions of both sulfur dioxide and carbon soot. The resulting "Human Volcano" is likely to be offsetting some of the warming from humanity's emissions of CO2. That is to say, the steady emissions may be having an combined impact no different than that of single, large volcanic eruptions which can boost sulfate into the stratosphere, where it is slowly removed over a period of years.
Member Since: October 28, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 45
441. sar2401
2:42 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting MahFL:
86F forecast for tomorrow here in Orange Park. Any day in July below 90 is nice.

The forecast high here is 89. Why is going to be cooler down there? Still, since we've been in the upper 90's to 100 for the past 10 days, even 89 will be a break.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16079
440. MahFL
2:41 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
"NIGHTTIME TEMPS WILL
ALSO BE A BIG CHANGE WITH EVEN SOME RECORD LOWS POSSIBLE ACROSS
SOUTHEAST GEORGIA WHERE TEMPS WILL DROP INTO THE MID 60S."

Lucky GA.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
439. hydrus
2:39 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
438. sar2401
2:39 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting Chucktown:
I just know where to begin with this. Nothing like a physicist explaining weather. Maybe this means I can be a surgeon with no education and go operate on someone. First Bill Nye, now this alarmist. SMH !!

Link

That was not the most coherent explanation of a cold front I've ever seen. However, the media just loves the "polar vortex" and they're not going to let it die. Any temperatures below normal will be caused by a "polar vortex" just like they always have been except we didn't call it a "polar vortex". Cold front just doesn't sound very ominous.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16079
437. MahFL
2:37 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
86F forecast for tomorrow here in Orange Park. Any day in July below 90 is nice.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
436. CitikatzSouthFL
2:37 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 413. MahFL:
Building codes were stenghened after Hurricane Andrew, weren't they ? So even with a similar storm, outside the eyewall you'd not see as much total devastation these days.

Even with the new building codes, we sustained a lot of damage during Francis, Jeanne and Wilma in S Florida. I shudder to think what the damage would be if a Cat 5 hit here.
Member Since: August 14, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 464
435. MahFL
2:35 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Rammasun's eye is pretty big, the whole of Manilla might experience the eye wall. Also on the current track the eye might go back over water for an hour or two before it passes over/near Manilla.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
434. hydrus
2:33 PM GMT on July 15, 2014

Andrew
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
433. silas
2:33 PM GMT on July 15, 2014

Quoting sar2401:

You can send any leftovers you don't want down this way. It's 85 with a dewpoint of 76...and I still don't have any rain!
No thanks, I'm happy with 60s!
Member Since: June 16, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 190
432. silas
2:31 PM GMT on July 15, 2014

Quoting georgevandenberghe:


Meanwhile in DC water is condensing on my OUTSIDE windows.
But we will get this cool shot with highs in the low 80s and lows in the low 60s (50s further out in the 'burbs"

Save the summer jacket. You'll eventually need it again for another outbreak.
You call low 80s cool? We've only gotten that high a few times this summer!

I don't think my jacket will still fit me 5-10+ years from now =)
Member Since: June 16, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 190
431. sar2401
2:30 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting silas:

I never thought I'd have to consider wearing a jacket during the day IN JULY here in southern Wisconsin! Still just 58 degrees here at 9:20!

You can send any leftovers you don't want down this way. It's 85 with a dewpoint of 76...and I still don't have any rain!
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16079
430. georgevandenberghe
2:28 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting silas:

I never thought I'd have to consider wearing a jacket during the day IN JULY here in southern Wisconsin! Still just 58 degrees here at 9:20!


Meanwhile in DC water is condensing on my OUTSIDE windows.
But we will get this cool shot with highs in the low 80s and lows in the low 60s (50s further out in the 'burbs"

Save the summer jacket. You'll eventually need it again for another outbreak.
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 18 Comments: 1826
429. hydrus
2:27 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 418. Dakster:



Hopefully, Andrew didn't have children that are coming to visit...
I know one thing, Nino is not goin to be here in time to quash storms at the peak of hurricane season. I went low on my prediction due to the arrival of at least a weak Nino.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
428. georgevandenberghe
2:25 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting Stormwatch247:





And look at the rare July COLD front that is moving southward! It will reach the Gulf Coast very soon. They are talking about record low temps in the SE USA this week?! Still looks like the beginning of a possible weak El Nino, no matter what they say, even if it occurs later in the year.

We should not let our guard down, when it comes to getting a major hurricane strike. Betsy, Alicia, Andrew ... all happened during slower or El Nino years.....

Anything is possible. As some of you have already mentioned, Ida (2009) was a strong November hurricane in the GOM, during an El Nino year. An interesting, but rare late-season hurricane!


Cold fronts get to the Gulf Coast most Julys but are little more than weak windshift lines by the time they get there. Some years a real, can't deny it cold front does cross the Gulf Coast and drying and slight cooling is noticable. Cold fronts make it to the upper south most summers several times a month.

This cool outbreak in 2014 will set a few records but has a lot of precedents, in particular July 1975. Weather watchers need to remember that "rare" is not the same as either "unique" or "never"
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 18 Comments: 1826
427. silas
2:24 PM GMT on July 15, 2014

Quoting whitewabit:
51.2 degrees recorded for the low on my temperature gauge this morning here in Central Illinois ..
highs today are near what our normal lows would be here the middle of July !!
I never thought I'd have to consider wearing a jacket during the day IN JULY here in southern Wisconsin! Still just 58 degrees here at 9:20!
Member Since: June 16, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 190
426. silas
2:21 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Dang, Rammasun really intensified overnight, but thankfully it didn't have another 12 hours over water or it may have made a run at Super Typhoon status. Hopefully it moves through the Philippines quickly so flooding isn't too big of a problem.

Member Since: June 16, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 190
425. MahFL
2:19 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 419. Tazmanian:

Andrew was not in a el nino year if I re call


It was an El Nino year, but the event was over. Hence the confusion.

"Although an El Niño formed in 1992, the year Hurricane Andrew struck Miami-Dade County, the weather pattern had dissipated before the Category 5 system hit, Lushine said."

Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
424. jpsb
2:16 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
El Niño remains on hold

Issued on Tuesday 15 July 2014 | Product Code IDCKGEWW00

Warming of the tropical Pacific Ocean over the past several months primed the climate system for an El Niño in 2014. However, a general lack of atmospheric response over the last month has resulted in some cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean.

While the majority of climate models suggest El Niño remains likely for the spring of 2014, most have eased their predicted strength. If an El Niño were to occur, it is increasingly unlikely to be a strong event.

Changes are also occurring in the Indian Ocean. The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) index has been below −0.4 °C (the negative IOD threshold) since mid-June, but it would need to remain negative into August to be considered as an event. Negative values are rare when the central Pacific is warmer than average. Model outlooks suggest the IOD is likely to return to neutral by spring. Conditions in the Indian Ocean may have contributed to the above-average rainfall experienced in southeast Australia during June.

El Niño is often associated with below-average rainfall over southern and eastern inland areas of Australia and above-average daytime temperatures over southern Australia. Conversely, a negative IOD pattern typically brings wetter winter and spring conditions to inland and southern Australia.

The ENSO Tracker is updated at the end of each month. It is currently at El Niño ALERT stage.


http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/


Member Since: June 30, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1193
423. whitewabit (Mod)
2:07 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
51.2 degrees recorded for the low on my temperature gauge this morning here in Central Illinois ..
highs today are near what our normal lows would be here the middle of July !!
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 364 Comments: 31559
422. Chucktown
2:07 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
I just know where to begin with this. Nothing like a physicist explaining weather. Maybe this means I can be a surgeon with no education and go operate on someone. First Bill Nye, now this alarmist. SMH !!

Link
Member Since: August 27, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1770
421. jrweatherman
2:05 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 419. Tazmanian:

Andrew was not in a el nino year if I re call


Pretty sure it was Taz.
Member Since: May 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 989
420. Sfloridacat5
1:56 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
2.65" so far this morning at my location in S.E. Fort Myers and more storms are moving into the area.
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7373
419. Tazmanian
1:50 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Andrew was not in a el nino year if I re call
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115241
418. Dakster
1:46 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 405. hydrus:

Almost 22 years has gone by.




Hopefully, Andrew didn't have children that are coming to visit...
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10442
417. hydrus
1:42 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21416
416. hurricanes2018
1:39 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Typhoon Rammasun
Last Updated Jul 15, 2014 06 GMT
Location 13.0N 124.7E Movement WNW
Wind 115 MPH
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 27 Comments: 53014
415. islander101010
1:34 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
got the ruler out manilla going to get this one bad
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 4731
414. weathermanwannabe
1:30 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
I am sure that Dr. M is taking his time this morning collecting any available information and stats on the Typhoon so that he can give us some insight as to the severity of the impacts. Looking forward to his Blog.

Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9231
413. MahFL
1:26 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Building codes were stenghened after Hurricane Andrew, weren't they ? So even with a similar storm, outside the eyewall you'd not see as much total devastation these days.
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3547
412. Stormwatch247
1:24 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 396. MAweatherboy1:

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
800 AM EDT TUE JUL 15 2014

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days.

$$
Forecaster Avila

...Probably safe to say we won't see development for the rest of this month. Shear rules the Caribbean and SAL rules the MDR, plus it's pretty early to be looking out there anyways. If there is development it would probably come from something of non-tropical origin off the East Coast, but there's not a high chance of that happening.





And look at the rare July COLD front that is moving southward! It will reach the Gulf Coast very soon. They are talking about record low temps in the SE USA this week?! Still looks like the beginning of a possible weak El Nino, no matter what they say, even if it occurs later in the year.

We should not let our guard down, when it comes to getting a major hurricane strike. Betsy, Alicia, Andrew ... all happened during slower or El Nino years.....

Anything is possible. As some of you have already mentioned, Ida (2009) was a strong November hurricane in the GOM, during an El Nino year. An interesting, but rare late-season hurricane!
Member Since: September 25, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 241
411. ncstorm
1:23 PM GMT on July 15, 2014

James Spann ‏@spann

Hettinger, North Dakota reports 39 degrees at 6a CT. And yes, this is the middle of July… #ndwx
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15669
410. hurricanes2018
1:22 PM GMT on July 15, 2014


nice looking eye on this Typhoon
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 27 Comments: 53014
409. ncstorm
1:20 PM GMT on July 15, 2014
Quoting 395. Brock31:



that is the tiniest purple dot I've ever seen.


it changed about 20 minutes after I posted..it was much bigger than what was showing earlier..

thanks..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15669

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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