Hurricane Arthur Shifts Left, Aims for a DIrect Hit in Eastern North Carolina

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 9:25 PM GMT on July 03, 2014

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Hurricane Arthur has shifted to the left inside its cone of track uncertainty, and is poised to deliver a direct hit to the barrier islands of eastern North Carolina on Thursday night and Friday morning. The hurricane's 90 mph winds and 979 mb pressure from the 5 pm EDT Thursday NHC advisory make Arthur as strong as the strongest hurricane of 2013, Hurricane Humberto. Humberto peaked as a Category 1 storm with 90 mph winds and a central pressure of 979 mb as it traversed the waters a few hundred miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands off the coast of Africa. The strongest winds measured at a buoy today in Arthur were 52 mph, gusting to 67 mph, measured at buoy 41004 offshore from Charleston, SC, at 12:50 pm EDT. Heavy rains from Arthur brought radar-estimated rainfall amounts of 3 - 4" as of 4:30 pm EDT near Wilmington, in southern North Carolina. Radar out of Wilmington shows that Arthur has developed an imposing area of heavy rains, but dry air is still infiltrating its core, creating a large gap in the eyewall. Satellite loops on Thursday afternoon showed a moderate-sized hurricane with a prominent eye surrounded by intense thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops. An excellent outflow channel has developed on the east side, but outflow is still restricted on the west side, where dry air is interfering with the storm. Wind shear a light 5 - 10 knots. Arthur's core has moved north of the axis of the Gulf Stream, and the hurricane is no longer able to take full advantage of the heat energy this narrow ribbon of very warm waters carries.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Tropical Storm Arthur, taken at approximately 16:30 UTC (12:30 pm EDT) on Thursday, July 3, 2014. At the time, Arthur was a Category 1 storm with 90 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.


Figure 2. Radar out of Wilmington, North Carolina at 4:39 pm EDT July 3, 2014.

Forecast for Arthur
With the eyewall still showing gaps due to dry air infiltration, rapid intensification into a Category 3 hurricane appears unlikely. The 18Z Thursday run of the SHIPS model predicted that wind shear will remain light to moderate, 5 - 15 knots, between now and Friday morning, then rise steeply. The model also predicted a 20% chance of rapid intensification--a 30 mph increase in winds in 24 hours. I put the odds Arthur becoming a Category 3 or stronger storm at 10%. The 5 pm EDT Thursday wind probability forecast from NHC gave Cape Hatteras a 80% chance of experiencing hurricane-force winds, and Morehead City a 92% chance. The 12Z Thursday runs of our top two track models, the GFS and European (ECMWF), showed the eye of Arthur hitting Cape Lookout, North Carolina between midnight and 1 am, with the strongest winds of the eyewall's right front quadrant affecting Cape Hatteras between 3 am - 5am.


Figure 3. Radar-estimated rainfall from Wilmington, North Carolina as of 4:44 pm EDT July 3, 2014.

Arthur's storm surge
Along with wind damage, the biggest threat from Arthur is coastal flooding due to storm surge. A surge of 2 - 5 feet will peak late Thursday night through early Friday morning from Morehead City, NC, to the North Carolina/Virginia border. Low tide will occur near 6:30 - 7 pm EDT Thursday night, and again at 7 - 7:30 am Friday morning. High tide will be between 12:30 - 1:00 am Friday, and this is when the highest water levels (storm tide) will occur along much of the North Carolina coast south of Cape Hatteras, due the combined effect of the storm surge and tide. Tidal range between low and high tide is about 2 feet along much of the North Carolina coast, though it is only about 0.5' along portions of the Outer Banks. Tidal range at the Hatteras USCG station, which isn't far from the lighthouse, is only 0.3', so it doesn't matter much when the surge arrives there. At 4 pm EDT on Thursday, Arthur was bringing a storm surge in excess of one foot to portions of the South Carolina and North Carolina coasts:

1.7' at Oyster Landing, SC
1.6' at Wrightsville Beach, NC
1.3' at Wilmington, NC
1.1' at Beufort, NC
0.8' at Charleston, SC

I highly recommend NHC's Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map to evaluate how high above high tide the storm surge is likely to inundate the coast.


Figure 4. Observed storm surge from previous Category 1 and 2 hurricanes to hit North Carolina. Isabel of 2003 brought the most dangerous surge of these historic storms, since it was a very large storm that took an unusual north-northeasterly track into the coast near the North Carolina/Virginia border. Image credit: Western Carolina University Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines Storm Surge Database.

Arthur's tornadoes
Tornadoes are another threat from Arthur, and NOAA's Storm Prediction Center recorded three preliminary tornado sightings in North Carolina between 3:20 and 4:40 pm EDT. A tornado watch continues through 2 am EDT Friday for coastal North Carolina.

Arthur's impact on Canada and New England
As Arthur accelerates northeastwards towards Nova Scotia, Canada, large waves of 4 - 5 feet will begin to pound coastal Massachusetts on Friday night. Sustained tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph and higher are likely on Cape Cod and Nantucket, Massachusetts between 8 pm Friday - 2 am Saturday, and the 5 pm EDT NHC wind probability forecast gave Nantucket an 82% chance of seeing tropical storm-force winds. By 8 am EDT Saturday, Arthur will be merging with a cold front and transitioning to a hurricane-strength extratropical storm, and is expected to make landfall in Nova Scotia later that morning. The 5 pm EDT NHC wind probability forecast gives Halifax, Nova Scotia an 80% chance of seeing tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or higher, and a 9% chance of hurricane-force winds.

Arthur's formation is not a harbinger of an active hurricane season
The first hurricane of the season typically occurs on August 10, so Arthur is quite a bit ahead of schedule. Arthur was able to form so early because it was over the very warm waters of the Gulf Stream Current, and these waters happened to be over 1°F warmer than usual for this time of year. Formation of a June or July hurricane like Arthur off the U.S. coast is typically not a harbinger of an active hurricane season, since these storms do not form from African tropical waves. Arthur spun up from a cluster of thunderstorms and their associated low pressure system that moved off the Southeast U.S. coast, and hurricanes that get their start this way are typically too far north and too close to land to be able to intensify into major hurricanes. The bigger threat are hurricanes that get their start from tropical waves traversing Main Development Region (MDR) for hurricanes (from the coast of Africa to Central America between 10° - 20°N, including the Caribbean Sea.) Tropical waves that traverse the MDR are responsible for 85% of all major (Category 3 and stronger) hurricanes. When June and July hurricanes and tropical storms form in the MDR, it usually does portend an active hurricane season, since it shows that atmospheric and oceanic conditions are primed to assist development of tropical waves coming off the coast of Africa during the peak mid-August through mid-October part of hurricane season.

A better way to evaluate whether or not this will be an active hurricane season is to look at sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the MDR, and the status of El Niño. MDR SSTs are currently very close to average, and are thus unlikely to contribute to an above-average hurricane season. The very warm equatorial waters currently off the coast of South America suggest that an El Niño event is in the process of developing. When an El Niño event occurs during hurricane season, it tends to create an atmospheric circulation that brings unusually strong upper-level winds to the tropical Atlantic. These strong winds create a shearing action (wind shear) on any tropical storms or hurricanes that may be attempting to form, disrupting their circulation. Thus, the pre-season predictions of a below-average or near-average hurricane season still look good.

Stay safe tonight, all of you in North Carolina!

Jeff Masters

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1646. ZacWeatherKidUK
10:44 PM GMT on July 06, 2014
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Member Since: December 27, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 186
1645. BahaHurican
8:49 AM GMT on July 05, 2014
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Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22357
1644. BahaHurican
3:55 AM GMT on July 05, 2014
Loooks like post-Arthur is still going to give the Canadian Maritimes a good drenching overnight.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22357
1643. vis0
8:02 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
CREDIT:: NOAA/NASA goes-e satellite via Canada.gov
Subject:: Hurricane Arthur 2014
Imagery type:: Visible & IR (clr-cloud temperatures)



Member Since: December 15, 2006 Posts: 249 Comments: 457
1642. vis0
6:09 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
CREDIT:: NOAA.NASA goes-e satellite via Canada.gov
Subject:: Hurricane Arthur 2014
Imagery type:: IR (clr-cloud temperatures) Re-Filtered colours (not professionally) by vis0(i) for more detail,  also recreated scale, hence the sloppy edges.

Imagery period::201407-02;0845UTC till 201407-04;1445UTC



Member Since: December 15, 2006 Posts: 249 Comments: 457
1641. VermontStorms
6:07 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting Inyo:
Rutland also had a huge storm a few weeks ago - golf ball sized hail messed up a bunch of cars, the storm had an apparent microburst and almost dropped a tornado. Not sure what's up with Rutland this year.



Rutland really tends to get rough weather. I think Killington causes storms to dump on Rutland, whereas over here by the river we are in the rain shadow of Killington (and Mt Ascutney, for stuff coming from the south) It is funny that such small mountains can have such an effect on weather, but they really do seem to.
Member Since: August 4, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5
1640. Grothar
5:24 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1614. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:

EARTH MODEL
SFC TEMPS WINDS
1700 JULY 4 2014



Keep. Glad to see you're back.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26548
1639. DeepSeaRising
5:22 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Arthur was a classic case too of a hurricane strengthening in spite of dry air entrainment throughout and yet obviously the dry air still have a very negative affect on the damage Arthur was capable of doing. Eye had good form but dry air within caused it to not be delivering the punch of a Cat 2 eye. The bands surrounding the eye had far more collapsing thunderstorms as compared to really intense bands that often accompany a Cat 2. And my favorite lesson of the night, if there is not widespread power outages and cell phone service is ongoing then really bad damage is likely not to be widespread. Did a little research on it, and that rings true based on power loss with the really bad hurricanes of past almost across the board. Thanks for that tidbit Sar, felt like commonsense after I thought about it.
Member Since: January 31, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 641
1638. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
5:20 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
1637. Jedkins01
5:20 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1433. HurrikanEB:

The frontal band of rain streaming across the interior northeast has dropped more rain than Arthur:










Well, you have to make sure to check radar estimates with some sample observations to see if they are accurate. Rain gauge data indicates the rainfall amounts are overestimated in parts of the northeast. Radar indicates solid 4-5 inches of rain over Albany NY, but rain reports are much lower, mainly 1-2 inches in the same areas showing 4-5 inches. Rain gauges in that 6-8 inch area show nowhere near that either, more like 2-3 inches. That's likely due to a lot ice growth in the area getting back to radar, that is brighter reflectivity than the rain rate really is.

Conversely, tropical systems notoriously have a lot heavier rainfall rates than the radar can estimate due to warm rain processes, that is warm core convection's ice growth layer is much higher into the atmosphere, the deeper depth of warm air allows the atmosphere to transport larger amounts if liquid water higher into the air. There are other reasons why warm process rain shows up as weaker reflectivity than it represents, which is why deep convection with -90 C thunderstorm tops in a hurricane may show up as only 50 -55 DBZ compared to 60-65 DBZ in a non-tropical environment. Dual pole radar can much better handle this problem, and gives much more accurate rainfall estimates. But this is not dual pole estimates, but standard radar estimates.
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7687
1636. yonzabam
5:19 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1631. sar2401:


Not true, Arthur being a good example. It took the storm a long time to really ramp up but, when it did, it was pretty impressive for what started as a continental low pressure system.


Of course it's true. SSTs, shear, vertical instability, dry air, SAL etc all influence both the initiation of storms, and their intensification, once they form.
Member Since: July 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2935
1635. sar2401
5:17 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting yonzabam:


No worries, Pedley. Taz is an experimental bot. Still needs a lot of work on it.

You're not very nic. :-) With my upcoming ban, I will wish you all a pleasant, safe, and fun Independence Day. I have relatives who are going to feed me and let me swim in their pool. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16207
1634. Grothar
5:16 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Happy 4th of July. I think we are all glad that Arthur didn't do as much damage as it could have, and the ones that were affected, get back to normal soon.

I wish that your 4th ends in a big bang.

Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26548
1633. yonzabam
5:15 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1628. Tazmanian:



you been reported even no it is ture that some did not leve but still not nic too be calling any one fools and posting a youtub video about it i think the modes sould re move the commet peddey CA made


No worries, Pedley. Taz is an experimental bot. Still needs a lot of work on it.
Member Since: July 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2935
1632. Bluestorm5
5:14 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1630. sar2401:


Not east bias in track, east bias in terms of the lopsided nature of the winds and rains. The fact that the strongest winds and heaviest precipitation stayed off shore is why we're seeing such light damage today.


Oh... agree with you completely. I was just 20 miles from western eyewall but winds weren't that impressive considering the location.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8032
1631. sar2401
5:13 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting yonzabam:


Factors which inhibit cyclogenesis also inhibit intensification.

Not true, Arthur being a good example. It took the storm a long time to really ramp up but, when it did, it was pretty impressive for what started as a continental low pressure system.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16207
1630. sar2401
5:11 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting Bluestorm5:


East bias? Arthur kept shifting westward up to landfall. It was supposed to landfall in Hatteras instead of Beaufort/Cape Lookout and going through Pamlico Sound. Heck, it nearly landfalled mainland North Carolina again while going through the sound.

Not east bias in track, east bias in terms of the lopsided nature of the winds and rains. The fact that the strongest winds and heaviest precipitation stayed offshore is why we're seeing such light damage today.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16207
1629. yonzabam
5:11 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1624. sar2401:


Indeed. If Arthur had started as purely tropical storm, things probably would have been different as well. I've always been perplexed by the idea that a season that's below average in the number of storms somehow means it will be below average in the intensity of storms. One is climate and one is weather. We can always get that one storm that turns out to be bad regardless of the rest of the season or El Nino, or lack thereof.


Factors which inhibit cyclogenesis also inhibit intensification.
Member Since: July 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2935
1628. Tazmanian
5:10 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1622. PedleyCA:

This is dedicated to all the fools that didn't leave the OBX yesterday. fool


you been reported even no it is ture that some did not leve but still not nic too be calling any one fools and posting a youtub video about it i think the modes sould re move the commet peddey CA made
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115253
1627. sar2401
5:10 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting FIUStormChaser:

It will be intresting, would like to see the 2pm models?

Regardless of the models, Cape Cod and Nantucket will get wind and rain, but they are pretty used to dealing with wind and rain. Heavy rain inland is the killer generally. If you look at Agnes, for example, relatively few people died from the direct result of the hurricane. The vast majority died from freshwater flooding. Many of the New England state have drainage systems that just didn't evolve to handle to handle tropical storm type rains.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16207
1626. Bluestorm5
5:09 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1564. sar2401:


Thankfully, the east bias in Arthur worked out for the best for NC. New England had some pretty severe storms yesterday, likely worse than than what they'll see today from Arthur.


East bias? Arthur kept shifting westward up to landfall. It was supposed to landfall in Hatteras instead of Beaufort/Cape Lookout and going through Pamlico Sound. Heck, it nearly landfalled mainland North Carolina again while going through the sound.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8032
1625. LostTomorrows
5:05 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
I just read that, even though last year was super lackluster, Ingrid's name still got retired. Although much of that was Manuel's influence, I'm sure. I'm sure there was an entry citing that on this blog, but it must have been one of the few I'd missed.

Cheers to Arthur for blowing 2013 out of the water all by himself! He's still maintaining a fantastic structure, and I'm not entirely convinced he'll be completely post-tropical by the time he hits Canada.
Member Since: August 26, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 602
1624. sar2401
5:03 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting CybrTeddy:
Speaking of the rest of the season, I think Arthur really illustrates what some people have been saying about this season: although it'll probably be inactive, there can still be homegrown threats. Imagine if Arthur had developed later in the year, or developed when there wasn't as much dry air forcing thunderstorm's to collapse in his core periodically. Arthur would have easily become a Category 3/4 hurricane as it struck the OBX, as it had an excellent structure throughout most of its trek. Watch out for any trough splits or tropical waves that make their way into the Bahamas this season, that's where the biggest problems may be for the United States.

Standing solid with 8-4-2 for a seasonal total.

Indeed. If Arthur had started as purely tropical storm, things probably would have been different as well. I've always been perplexed by the idea that a season that's below average in the number of storms somehow means it will be below average in the intensity of storms. One is climate and one is weather. We can always get that one storm that turns out to be bad regardless of the rest of the season or El Nino, or lack thereof.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 16207
1623. JRRP
5:01 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5996
1621. Climate175
4:57 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Anyone want to come on chat? Link
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1620. HurricaneAndre
4:54 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
The BOC is getting interesting.
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 20 Comments: 3212
1619. Climate175
4:52 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1605. CybrTeddy:

Speaking of the rest of the season, I think Arthur really illustrates what some people have been saying about this season: although it'll probably be inactive, there can still be homegrown threats. Imagine if Arthur had developed later in the year, or developed when there wasn't as much dry air forcing thunderstorm's to collapse in his core periodically. Arthur would have easily become a Category 3/4 hurricane as it struck the OBX, as it had an excellent structure throughout most of its trek. Watch out for any trough splits or tropical waves that make their way into the Bahamas this season, that's where the biggest problems may be for the United States.

Standing solid with 8-4-2 for a seasonal total.
Yes and some that may go inland
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4232
1618. DeepSeaRising
4:50 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Certainly learned not every Cat2 packs the same punch. When a 100 mph Cat 2 with an eyewall that goes to the West of the OB, I really was concerned that it could be devastation. Looked liked the worst possible path and we've seen far weaker storms in the past do real devastation. Even the Eastern bands that hit Hatteras upward didn't have the punch that radar showed they might have. Great that reports show minimal damage from Arthur and the fact that no one has died is pretty amazing and miraculous. I've certainly learned that it's far more than wind profile and track that make a storm potentially deadly. Arthur's wind never materialized fully, highest sustained reported were just at or above hurricane strength and Arthur was strongest in his far outer Eastern bands and those stayed off the OB. The eye was not as strong as one would typically expect with a Cat 2 either. I was one who said last night that I was concerned this could be very bad. With a 100 mph storm with an eye going the the length of the OB to the West, lot of criteria were there to think that. I was wrong and a handful of others thought the opposite and they were right. Just shows every hurricane is amazingly unique and track and wind certainly are never the full story.
Member Since: January 31, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 641
1616. Inyo
4:43 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Rutland also had a huge storm a few weeks ago - golf ball sized hail messed up a bunch of cars, the storm had an apparent microburst and almost dropped a tornado. Not sure what's up with Rutland this year. Montpelier hasn't had a severe storm yet this year, which is fine. Last year we had one rip through, tear up some trees, and knock out power. Though this latest storm did bring down the broadband internet for a bit (nooo!) it didn't cause real problems here

Quoting 1464. VermontStorms:



I heard Rutland got hit hard too, but last night it sounded like you guys were going to get pounded. Glad it wasn't too bad.
Member Since: September 3, 2002 Posts: 42 Comments: 873
1615. Wolfberry
4:42 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
I love reading Gro's posts so I just look for the most 'likes'..Gro you were quite the artist in your formative years!!..Happy Fourth Everyone..
Member Since: April 1, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 206
1614. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
4:42 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
EARTH MODEL
SFC TEMPS WINDS
1700 JULY 4 2014
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54630
1612. yonzabam
4:42 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
A slow hurricane season was predicted because of an expected El Nino and the fact that SSTs in the MDR are only average. But, the El Nino is beginning to look marginal, and SSTs can pick up quickly.

SAL's an issue, but if lack of vertical stability is above average throughout the region, that would be a big boost.
Member Since: July 20, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2935
1611. Patrap
4:40 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
uncle arthur reminds me of cindy 05,fast former,became hurricane at landfall, but wit a S to N impact, left 200k w/o power and we were still mulching trees from it,on playgrounds when K hit.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
1607. hydrus
4:36 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1586. weatherlover94:

Hopefully this is the last of the landfalling Hurricanes for 2014
Me too.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21493
1606. Patrap
4:36 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
.....'I am that Yankee doodle boy'..

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
1605. CybrTeddy
4:34 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Speaking of the rest of the season, I think Arthur really illustrates what some people have been saying about this season: although it'll probably be inactive, there can still be homegrown threats. Imagine if Arthur had developed later in the year, or developed when there wasn't as much dry air forcing thunderstorm's to collapse in his core periodically. Arthur would have easily become a Category 3/4 hurricane as it struck the OBX, as it had an excellent structure throughout most of its trek. Watch out for any trough splits or tropical waves that make their way into the Bahamas this season, that's where the biggest problems may be for the United States.

Standing solid with 8-4-2 for a seasonal total.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24251
1603. Patrap
4:31 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1594. Grothar:




Now you're a polite young man. Thank you. I remember a post you made when many bloggers couldn't see anything that would form off the SE coast and move SW then NNE. It read, "If Gro says there will be a storm, that is good enough for me" I may leave you some of my painting in my will. I left them on a cave in France, but here is a sample






Do u still have my burnt umber charcoal palette?
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128871
1601. FIUStormChaser
4:28 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1593. sar2401:


I think the effects on Cape Cod and Nantucket will be minimal. There are likely to be more flooding issues inland than what we'll see on the coast or offshore.

It will be intresting, would like to see the 2pm models?
Member Since: May 1, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 775
1599. hurricanes2018
4:27 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 29 Comments: 58452
1598. PedleyCA
4:27 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1576. HurricaneHunterJoe:



Maybe we can get a better price buying multiple A/C units....




I have Central AC here, I am just too PO to use it and my water cooler works just fine 90% of the time.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5955
1597. FIUStormChaser
4:26 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting 1592. Randrewl:

It might be nice to get at least one plus on my side!

Nobody gives a damn regarding us old farts!




Here is your +1. If i could give you +2 i would too, but there is not option for that.
Member Since: May 1, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 775
1596. sar2401
4:25 PM GMT on July 04, 2014
Quoting GatorWX:


That's what I'll be watching.

More giant typhoons in the Western Pacific. Makes Arthur look pretty small time by comparison. I feel for those people. :-(
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.