Record May Heat, Drought, and Fires Scorch California

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:21 PM GMT on May 15, 2014

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Record May heat sent temperatures soaring above 100° in much of Southern California on Wednesday, and fierce Santa Ana winds fanned fires that scorched at least 9,000 acres in San Diego County, forcing thousands to evacuate. Los Angeles Airport hit 96° on Wednesday, which is the hottest May temperature on record NOAA's Threaded Extremes website (though apparently these records are not correct, since NWS Los Angeles says the all-time May record is 97°.) All-time May record heat was recorded at Camarillo (102°) and Oxnard (102°) on Wednesday. In Downtown Los Angeles, the mercury hit 99° on Wednesday, falling short of the all-time May record is 103° set on May 25, 1896. More record heat is forecast on Thursday, and hot offshore Santa Ana winds will bring extreme fire danger.


Figure 1. A firenado in Fallbrook, California at old Highway 395 and Interstate 15 on May 14, 2014. Image credit: Jena Rents via Twitter.


Figure 2. True-color MODIS satellite image of fires burning in Southern California and Northern Mexico on Wednesday afternoon, May 14, 2014. Image credit: NASA.

100% of California in severe to exceptional drought
Today's U.S. Drought Monitor report showed grim news for California: 100% of the state is now in severe or higher drought, up from 96% the previous week. Though just 25% of California is classified as being in the highest level of drought, "Exceptional", Erin McCarthy at the Wall Street Journal estimates that farms comprising 53% of California's $44.7 billion market value lie in the Exceptional drought area. Averaged state-wide, the Palmer Drought Severity Index during April 2014 was the second worst on record, behind 1977. For the 12-month period ending in April, drought conditions in California for 2013 - 2014 were also the second most severe on record, slightly below the 2008 - 2009 drought. To break the drought, most of the state needs 9 - 15" or precipitation to fall in one month. This amounts to more than a half-year's worth of precipitation for most of the state.


Figure 3. The May 13, 2014 U.S. Drought Monitor showed 100% of California in severe or higher drought, with 25% of the state in the highest level of drought, "Exceptional." Image credit: U.S. Drought Monitor.

California's rainy season is over
The California October through April rainy season is now over. Between October 2013 and April 2014, the state received 10.44" of precipitation, which is just 51% of average for the period, and the third lowest such total on record. Going back to 1895, the record low mark was set in 1976 - 1977, when the state got just 34% of its average rainy season precipitation. California typically receives less than 10% of its annual precipitation between May and September, and the coming hot and dry summer in combination with a severely depleted Sierra snowpack will cause a severe fire season and significant agricultural damages. The fifth and final snow survey of the season on May 1 found that the statewide snowpack’s water content--which normally provides about a third of the water for California’s farms and cities--was only 18% of average for the date. Already, the 2014 drought has cost the state at least $3.6 billion in agricultural damages, the California Farm Water Coalition estimates. CAL FIRE recently announced it had hired 125 additional firefighters to help address the increased fire threat due to drought conditions.


Video 1. Aerial views of the Southern California fires from Reuters. Thanks to wunderground member Skyepony for posting this link in my blog comments.

Related Posts
California Drought/Polar Vortex Jet Stream Pattern Linked to Global Warming, my April 16, 2014 post

I've done four posts this year on ways to get more water for the thirsty Southwest:
1) Conservation measures
2) Cloud seeding
3) Desalinization plants
4) Enormous Water Works Programs

Jeff Masters

Carlsbad/ Pointsettia fire (tunatony)
San Diego county, Carlsbad fire as seen from Del Dios Highlands Preserve.
Carlsbad/ Pointsettia fire
Washingtonia Fire San Marcos, Ca (WatchinTheSky)
I think this is fire number 7 in the county of San Diego today....
Washingtonia Fire San Marcos, Ca
Ensenada May Fire (bajadock)
Ensenada May Fire

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449. ColoradoBob1
12:39 AM GMT on May 18, 2014
The Balkan floods :

The most outrageous thing about this flood, Thousands of landmines have been washed away from their original locations. You not only have a ruined life , it may have landmines buried in the mud next to your family keepsakes.
Member Since: August 13, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2717
448. hydrus
10:14 PM GMT on May 17, 2014
Quoting 442. Llamaluvr:

I love it when StormTrackerScott goes macho! He's sexy and he know's it !!!
Wont be long before he stomps a mud hole in some trolls tail for sweatin Nino......:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21734
447. CuriousAboutClimate
6:12 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 440. jpsb:

Ever wonder why so few Skeptical papers are published? Well here is why

Study suggesting global warming is exaggerated was rejected for publication in respected journal because it was 'less than helpful' to the climate cause, claims professor


There is a similar report at The Times

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/science/article4091 344.ece



lol, the paper wasn't published because it offered nothing in the way of furthering scientific understanding.
Member Since: January 28, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 217
446. yoboi
5:29 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 367. Neapolitan:


The point of those headlines--and others--isn't that a May Santa Ana event in and of itself is rare. It's that such a strong Santa Ana event, coupled with a record drought , and coming at the tail end of what's normally the rainy season but this year was practically nonexistent, is a possible/likely harbinger of what might be a particularly nasty time of fire. A few saving graces, though: 1) lower-than-average rainfall over winter leads to less profuse wildland growth, so there's actually a bit less to burn than there otherwise might have been; and 2) the pending El Nino is certain to bring rains by fall that could put an early end to fire season (albeit at the expense of floods and landslides).


Not true.......
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 7 Comments: 2386
445. Barefootontherocks
5:26 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 367. Neapolitan:



The point of those headlines--and others--isn't that a May Santa Ana event in and of itself is rare. It's that such a strong Santa Ana event, coupled with a record drought , and coming at the tail end of what's normally the rainy season but this year was practically nonexistent, is a possible/likely harbinger of what might be a particularly nasty time of fire. A few saving graces, though: 1) lower-than-average rainfall over winter leads to less profuse wildland growth, so there's actually a bit less to burn than there otherwise might have been; and 2) the pending El Nino is certain to bring rains by fall that could put an early end to fire season (albeit at the expense of floods and landslides).
Each of those headlines says "early." Hype-y headlines is what counts. Most people don't even read the story. Bottom line, I disagree with you.
Member Since: April 29, 2006 Posts: 156 Comments: 18935
444. Xulonn
4:44 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
.
Member Since: June 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 1489
443. fireflymom
2:43 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Venomous not  poisonus like arsenic or a bad mushroom.
Poisonous snake crawling time,
Member Since: June 5, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 591
442. Llamaluvr
2:37 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 385. StormTrackerScott:



I figure I would post it again as 2 days ago you blasted me on it so I figure I would give you your daily dose of crow as you have been eating plenty lately and you will continue to do so as long as you try to combat my post.
I love it when StormTrackerScott goes macho! He's sexy and he know's it !!!
Member Since: July 8, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 241
441. TimSoCal
2:26 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 401. StormTrackerScott:


I would rather deal with flooding than drought and wildfires any day. What they are going thru out west is just unreal and its only going to get worse as there rainy season is a long ways away.



Yeah, both scenarios are bad, but I'd rather have too much water than too little.
Member Since: July 9, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 781
440. jpsb
2:23 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Ever wonder why so few Skeptical papers are published? Well here is why

Study suggesting global warming is exaggerated was rejected for publication in respected journal because it was 'less than helpful' to the climate cause, claims professor


There is a similar report at The Times

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/science/article4091 344.ece
Member Since: June 30, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1197
439. ZacWeatherKidUK
2:21 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
.
Member Since: December 27, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 203
438. ricderr
2:15 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
A strong El-Nino would definitely increase the likely hood of heavy rains across California. The floods California will likely experience later this year could be extreme due to all of the wildfire ongoing now depleted the vegatation.

The last strong El Niño in the winter of 1997-1998 is a good case study of a wet El Niño year, but one with no major flooding. Despite nearly double the normal rainfall over most of California, there was nearly twice the number of days of rain with no huge concentrated deluges, and statewide damage totals were about $500 million. Compare this with the flooding that took place around New Year of 1997, a period with no El Niño, when a week's worth of warm atmospheric river rain resulted in $1.8 billion in damage statewide.
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22006
437. ncstorm
2:15 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 389. K8eCane:



Poisonous snake crawling time, which mortifies me.















i have seen nothing but snakes and turtles here in Wilmington..just crossing the busy roads of terrible drivers..the snakes I have no sympathy for but the slow turtles have no chance against our drivers..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 16010
436. StormTrackerScott
2:13 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 432. luvtogolf:



What happened to the 4-6" that the "West Coast" is going to get?


HRRR model did show that however some places got 2" to 3" however 8" to 10" fell west of Gainesville. Also the HRRR model was right on the money yesterday when showing 3" to 5" in some areas across E C FL.
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
435. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
2:13 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
434. StormTrackerScott
2:11 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 428. Tazmanian:




LOL whats up with the black line takeing a dip


CPC is flipping back and forth every few days it seems. As it stands El-Nino is here and it's very evident by looking at this map below. Should be declared the beginning of June.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
432. luvtogolf
2:11 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 385. StormTrackerScott:



I figure I would post it again as 2 days ago you blasted me on it so I figure I would give you your daily dose of crow as you have been eating plenty lately and you will continue to do so as long as you try to combat my post.


What happened to the 4-6" that the "West Coast" is going to get?
Member Since: June 12, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1110
431. ricderr
2:10 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Mary Voice
National Climate Centre, Melbourne, Australia

"During my career in climate services in Australia, a major hurdle has been jumped by the temperamental thoroughbred named El Niño. El Niño has escaped from the corral of the scientific world and is now running free in the community. Over the past decade, a significant section of the Australian community has heard of El Niño and knows that it is linked to the Australian droughts. Many people in climate-sensitive industries have a broad understanding of the Australian consequences of El Niño and also its temperamental behavior. This is a major step forward for a country like Australia, so strongly affected by El Niño."

"Like all new theories released into the domain of human communication (the media, word of mouth, etc.), and like that thoroughbred just over a hurdle, we must now keep its head pointed in the right direction. As scientific communicators, we must ensure that every storm and every seasonal fluctuation is not attributed to El Niño through false enthusiasm. We must hold onto the reigns and point our thoroughbred El Niño in the direction of cautious utility for the community, rather than the wild speculation of the racecourse betting ring. This need will increase, as more and more "punters" join in the predictions of the future track record of El Niño."
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22006
430. StormTrackerScott
2:10 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 425. ricderr:

Myth 5: When there is an El Niño, there is lots of rain in California. No -- The answer is not always and not everywhere. Historical records for the past six plus decades for Central California, including the SF Bay Area, show that during the twenty-two El Niño events the rainfall has been roughly above normal (i.e., > 120%) half the time and below normal (<80%) the other half. If just the six strong El Niño events are looked at then the rainfall has been above normal four of the five seasons, and all four were at least 140% of normal. However, if only the weak and moderate El Niños are examined then it is seen that six of the 16 years received below normal rainfall, five near normal (80%-120%) and five above normal. [see Climatology of El Niño Events and California Precipitation]

Over the same span, Northern California had three wet years years during the five strong events, with five above-normal seasons during the seventeen weak-to-moderate El Niños.

Southern California showed more of a wet bias during strong El Niños with above-normal rain in four of the five seasons, near normal the fifth year. During weak to moderate events Southern California precipitation was above normal six of the 17 seasons, near normal six seasons and below normal the remaining five yearss.

The bottom line is that California can get wet during El Niño, but not always. As a matter of fact, the California drought in the 1976-77 winter was during a weak El Niño. It is important to keep in mind that El Niño is not the only thing happening in the atmosphere and that other patterns can either enhance or detract from its overall impact.


A strong El-Nino would definitely increase the likely hood of heavy rains across California. The floods California will likely experience later this year could be extreme due to all of the wildfire ongoing now depleted the vegatation.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
429. LAbonbon
2:09 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 416. dabirds:

Is St. Patrick's Day tomorrow? 45 w/ 45 dew pt (though not raining here), (edit: 43 wind chill, haven't seen that for a month), lows were 40-41, 4-8 W winds w/ 17 gust, 29.93", might make 60 for a high in S C IL. Midweek will bring summertime temps back. Should be a nice weekend though.

What's the Preakness forecast?


Saw this earlier on Accuweather:

"Officials of the Maryland Jockey Club said the dirt track at Pimlico dries fast and runs well in mud.

According to Mike Gathagan, vice president of communications of the Maryland Jockey Club, "As a precaution, crews can seal the track after racing activities on Thursday, ahead of the rain
."

Full article: Torrential Rain Douses Pimlico Race Course Ahead of Preakness


I've often wondered how exactly they 'seal the track'.
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
427. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
2:07 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 175 Comments: 54827
426. ricderr
2:07 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Myth 6: El Niño means disastrous flooding for California. No -- only occasionally. It is just as likely that California will have significant flooding in a non-El Niño year. Of the 10 costliest flood years in California since 1950, only four happened during a season when there was an El Niño. Two others occurred during seasons with La Niña, and the final four were when the temperature of the tropical Pacific was near normal. [see El Niño and La Niña...Their Relationship to California Flood Damage]

The major weather pattern that causes flooding in California is when a strong surge of subtropical moisture dumps copious amounts of rain over a portion of California for five to seven days. These are so-called Atmospheric Rivers ("Pineapple connection") and they are slightly more prevalent during years when there is no El Niño.

The last strong El Niño in the winter of 1997-1998 is a good case study of a wet El Niño year, but one with no major flooding. Despite nearly double the normal rainfall over most of California, there was nearly twice the number of days of rain with no huge concentrated deluges, and statewide damage totals were about $500 million. Compare this with the flooding that took place around New Year of 1997, a period with no El Niño, when a week's worth of warm atmospheric river rain resulted in $1.8 billion in damage statewide.
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22006
425. ricderr
2:06 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Myth 5: When there is an El Niño, there is lots of rain in California. No -- The answer is not always and not everywhere. Historical records for the past six plus decades for Central California, including the SF Bay Area, show that during the twenty-two El Niño events the rainfall has been roughly above normal (i.e., > 120%) half the time and below normal (<80%) the other half. If just the six strong El Niño events are looked at then the rainfall has been above normal four of the five seasons, and all four were at least 140% of normal. However, if only the weak and moderate El Niños are examined then it is seen that six of the 16 years received below normal rainfall, five near normal (80%-120%) and five above normal. [see Climatology of El Niño Events and California Precipitation]

Over the same span, Northern California had three wet years years during the five strong events, with five above-normal seasons during the seventeen weak-to-moderate El Niños.

Southern California showed more of a wet bias during strong El Niños with above-normal rain in four of the five seasons, near normal the fifth year. During weak to moderate events Southern California precipitation was above normal six of the 17 seasons, near normal six seasons and below normal the remaining five yearss.

The bottom line is that California can get wet during El Niño, but not always. As a matter of fact, the California drought in the 1976-77 winter was during a weak El Niño. It is important to keep in mind that El Niño is not the only thing happening in the atmosphere and that other patterns can either enhance or detract from its overall impact.
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22006
424. StormTrackerScott
2:06 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
LOL. CPC continues to flip flop. Now back to strong El-Nino after lowering it's prediction a few days ago.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
423. Climate175
2:05 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
I will rephrase that East Coast better watch out soon.
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4412
422. ricderr
2:05 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Myth 4: We will see the impacts from El Niño any day now. No -- the long-range ocean and atmosphere forecasts from NOAA and other agencies are just that, forecasts. If the forecast warm-up does occur in the tropical Pacific later this summer and fall, the earliest effects would not be felt until the cooler periods of late fall or winter
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 675 Comments: 22006
421. Llamaluvr
2:03 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 420. Tazmanian:





no its not its going too be shut down most of the season
Hi Taz ! How's the weather today in Bolivia ?
Member Since: July 8, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 241
419. StormTrackerScott
1:56 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
General consensus on the Euro for 1.8C by November across Nino 3.4.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
418. Climate175
1:54 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Farmers Almanac was about Preakness being dry.
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4412
417. Climate175
1:52 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
The Atlantic is gonna wake up very soon..
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4412
416. dabirds
1:50 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Is St. Patrick's Day tomorrow? 45 w/ 45 dew pt (though not raining here), (edit: 43 wind chill, haven't seen that for a month), lows were 40-41, 4-8 W winds w/ 17 gust, 29.93", might make 60 for a high in S C IL. Midweek will bring summertime temps back. Should be a nice weekend though.

What's the Preakness forecast?
Member Since: August 23, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 772
414. Climate175
1:43 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 412. Torito:



north-west of DC, where storm #E2 is on that map.
Clearing skies are coming.
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4412
413. Skyepony (Mod)
1:42 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Yeah this is from some guys kitchen...but nice use of WUnderMap..

Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 191 Comments: 38624
412. Torito
1:34 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 410. LAbonbon:


LOL...let me guess...you're in DC?


north-west of DC, where storm #E2 is on that map.
Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316
411. Llamaluvr
1:34 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 401. StormTrackerScott:



I would rather deal with flooding than drought and wildfires any day. What they are going thru out west is just unreal and its only going to get worse as there rainy season is a long ways away.


Good morning Scott! I'm with you!
Member Since: July 8, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 241
410. LAbonbon
1:33 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 409. Torito:

Good. Stay over there to the east, rain.. light rain is good enough here.




LOL...let me guess...you're in DC?
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
409. Torito
1:29 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Good. Stay over there to the east, rain.. light rain is good enough here.

Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316
408. HurricaneAndre
1:26 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW ORLEANS LA
556 AM CDT FRI MAY 16 2014

GMZ530-532-534-536-538-550-552-555-557-570-572-57 5-577-LAZ034>037-
039-040-046>050-056>072-MSZ068>071-077-080>082-16 2300-
LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN AND LAKE MAUREPAS-MISSISSIPPI SOUND-
LAKE BORGNE-CHANDELEUR SOUND-BRETON SOUND-
COASTAL WATERS FROM PORT FOURCHON TO LOWER ATCHAFALAYA RIVER OUT
20 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM THE SOUTHWEST PASS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER
TO PORT FOURCHON OUT 20 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM BOOTHVILLE LA TO THE SOUTHWEST PASS OF THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUT 20 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM PASCAGOULA MS TO STAKE ISLAND LA OUT 20 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM PORT FOURCHON TO LOWER ATCHAFALAYA RIVER FROM
20 TO 60 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM THE SOUTHWEST PASS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER
TO PORT FOURCHON FROM 20 TO 60 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM STAKE ISLAND LA TO THE SOUTHWEST PASS OF THE
MISSISSIPPI RIVER FROM 20 TO 60 NM-
COASTAL WATERS FROM PASCAGOULA MS TO STAKE ISLAND LA FROM 20 TO
60 NM-POINTE COUPEE-WEST FELICIANA-EAST FELICIANA-ST. HELENA-
WASHINGTON-ST. TAMMANY-IBERVILLE-WEST BATON ROUGE-
EAST BATON ROUGE-ASCENSION-LIVINGSTON-ASSUMPTION-ST. JAMES-
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST-UPPER LAFOURCHE-ST. CHARLES-UPPER JEFFERSON-
ORLEANS-UPPER PLAQUEMINES-UPPER ST. BERNARD-UPPER TERREBONNE-
LOWER TERREBONNE-LOWER LAFOURCHE-LOWER JEFFERSON-
LOWER PLAQUEMINES-LOWER ST. BERNARD-NORTHERN TANGIPAHOA-
SOUTHERN TANGIPAHOA-WILKINSON-AMITE-PIKE-WALTHALL-PEARL RIVER-
HANCOCK-HARRISON-JACKSON-
556 AM CDT FRI MAY 16 2014

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST
LOUISIANA...SOUTH MISSISSIPPI AND THE ADJACENT COASTAL WATERS.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT ANTICIPATED TODAY OR TONIGHT.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...SATURDAY THROUGH THURSDAY

HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS NOT ANTICIPATED THROUGH THURSDAY.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SPOTTER ACTIVATION IS NOT ANTICIPATED.

$$
Read this carefully. This is really contradictory.
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 20 Comments: 3332
407. LAbonbon
1:24 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Bosnia, Serbia Flooding Kills At Least 2, Thousands Wait to Be Evacuated

May 16, 2014

Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina have been hit by some of the worst flooding in each country's history, killing at least two people and pushing hundreds from their homes.

(More on the flood impacts, including a photo slideshow, is here.)
Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
406. Climate175
1:23 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 405. Torito:

HOT.


You can say that again.
Member Since: September 24, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 4412
405. Torito
1:19 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
HOT.



24.5 degrees celcius is about 77 degrees F.
Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316
404. Torito
1:18 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316
403. NativeSun
1:16 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Scott. I still use my degree to some extent as it helps me with my hobby, I like keeping marine reef tanks and the biology degree really comes in handy. I love the weather too, and excelled in math and sciences in school. On the El-Nino this year I don't see a strong to super Nino like you do more of a weak to moderate one and a more active season this year. The Nino is not the end to a normal to above normal season but a portion of the puzzle to what we may see this year.
Member Since: July 17, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 278
402. LAbonbon
1:13 PM GMT on May 16, 2014


Member Since: June 26, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1817
401. StormTrackerScott
1:08 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 396. washingtonian115:

I know people are focused on the west coast and the drought.But what about the east coast and all the flooding we've been getting?.I guess pushing the other proves peoples point faster...


I would rather deal with flooding than drought and wildfires any day. What they are going thru out west is just unreal and its only going to get worse as there rainy season is a long ways away.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 7 Comments: 3754
400. Torito
1:06 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
Quoting 398. Tazmanian:




plzs check the oder post be for posting some in that been posted all ready see post 387


Bro, its a different enhancement for the floater. :p
Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316
399. Torito
1:05 PM GMT on May 16, 2014
-----------TEST-----------





------------At 1200 UTC, 16 May 2014, MAJOR HURRICANE SIMPSON (AL50) was located in the North Atlantic basin at 23.0°N and 73.5°W. The current intensity was 125 kt and the center was moving at 8 kt at a bearing of 285 degrees. The minimum central pressure was 951 mb----------

-----------END TEST--------

Good to see RAL is doing their testing of relaying NOAA data. Keeping the place safe is the top priority.
Member Since: April 30, 2013 Posts: 5 Comments: 4316

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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