IPCC: Climate Change Increasing Risk of Hunger, Thirst, Disease, Refugees, and War

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 11:42 AM GMT on March 31, 2014

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Climate change is already having "widespread impacts", and has the potential to worsen global hunger, water availability, disease, drought, flooding, refugees, and war in the coming decades if we do nothing to reduce it, said the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) today, in the latest installment of their once-every-seven-year report on the climate. Today's report on climate change impacts and how we can adapt to them warned that "throughout the 21st century, climate-change impacts are projected to slow down economic growth, make poverty reduction more difficult, further erode food security, and prolong existing and create new poverty traps." Today's report by the Nobel-prize winning group of scientists was the second of four parts. Part 1, released in September 2013, covered the physical science behind climate change. Part 3 (due out in mid-April, 2014) will discuss how we can mitigate (reduce) climate change impacts. Part 4 (due out in early November, 2014) will present a grand summary of Parts 1, 2, and 3. Some key themes from today's report:

Food supplies will tighten. To me, the most important finding of the report is the climate change's threat to reduce global food supplies, which have already been negatively impacted, and are at risk to get much worse: “Based on many studies covering a wide range of regions and crops, negative impacts of climate change on crop yields have been more common than positive impacts. Climate change has negatively affected wheat and maize (corn) yields for many regions and in the global aggregate." For the future, the report acknowledges that some areas will likely see increases in food production, due to increased CO2 in the air and more favorable precipitation, but the overall global trend in food supplies will likely be downward (Figure 1.) This downward trend in yields will occur in the face of rapidly increasing demand, as the population grows by 2 billion, resulting in "increased likelihood of under-nutrition resulting from diminished food production in poor regions."


Figure 1. Summary of projected changes in crop yields, due to climate change over the 21st century. The figure includes projections for different emission scenarios, for tropical and temperate regions, and for adaptation and no-adaptation cases combined. Over the period 2010 - 2029, about as many scenarios predict an increase in global crop yields as predict a decrease. However, beyond 2030, more than twice as many scenarios predict a decrease versus an increase. Relatively few studies have considered impacts on cropping systems for scenarios where global mean temperatures increase by 4°C or more. For five time frames in the near-term and long-term, data (n=1090) are plotted in the 20-year period on the horizontal axis that includes the midpoint of each future projection period. Changes in crop yields are relative to late-20th-century levels. Data for each time frame sum to 100%. Image credit: IPCC.

Water availability to people will decrease, as wet areas get wetter and dry areas get drier. Not only does climate change pose huge risks to our food supply, it also threatens water availability. “The fraction of global population experiencing water scarcity and the fraction affected by major river floods increase with the level of warming in the 21st century.”

We're not adapting fast enough to avoid serious damage. The report talks about "adaptation deficits", as demonstrated by our relatively poor ability to respond to impacts from from recent extreme climatic events. "Climate-change-related risks from extreme events, such as heat waves, extreme precipitation, and coastal flooding, are already moderate (high confidence) and high with 1°C additional warming (medium confidence)." IPCC author and Princeton Professor Michael Oppenheimer put it more succinctly to the Associated Press: “We’re all sitting ducks.”

Poor people are most at risk from climate change. Climate-related hazards constitute an additional burden to people living in poverty, acting as a threat multiplier.

Climate change increases the risk of violence. For the first time, the IPCC lays out the case that climate change can add a destabilizing factor that can make violence more likely in countries with social and economic inequalities. "Climate change can indirectly increase risks of violent conflicts in the form of civil war and inter-group violence by amplifying well-documented drivers of these conflicts such as poverty and economic shocks."

Climate change increases the risk of more refugees. "Displacement risk increases when populations that lack the resources for planned migration experience higher exposure to extreme weather events."

Climate change will be costly. Though the uncertainties are high, the costs for an additional 2°C rise in temperature are thought to be between 0.2 and 2.0% of global GDP. "Losses are more likely than not to be greater, rather than smaller, than this range, since it is difficult to account for catastrophic changes, tipping points, and many other factors."

Human health will suffer. "Throughout the 21st century, climate change is expected to lead to increases in ill-health in many regions and especially in developing countries with low income…the magnitude and severity of negative impacts are projected to increasingly outweigh positive impacts. Examples include greater likelihood of injury, disease, and death due to more intense heat waves and fires; increased likelihood of under-nutrition resulting from diminished food production in poor regions; risks from lost work capacity and reduced labor productivity in vulnerable populations; and increased risks from food- and water-borne diseases and vector-borne diseases" (like malaria.)

We can take action to reduce these substantial risks. "Mitigation is considered essential for managing the risks of climate change." Mitigation refers to human actions to reduce climate change. Burning fewer fossil fuels and thus putting less CO2 in the air is essential to mitigating climate change. We should view the next few decades as the era of ‘climate responsibility’, when we can make a huge difference to keep our future climate livable. The report emphasizes that if greenhouse gases continue to rise, the world can expect an additional 6 - 7°F (3.5 - 4°C) of warming by 2100, instead of the international goal of keeping this rise less than 2°F (1.2°C). Princeton's Dr. Oppenheimer compared these two choices as "the difference between driving on an icy road at 30 mph versus 90 mph. It's risky at 30, but deadly at 90." Uncertainty is not a reason to delay climate action, and it is cheaper to act now on climate change than to delay. The International Energy Agency said in 2013 that in order to keep global warming less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels, "Delaying stronger climate action until 2020 would avoid $1.5 trillion in low-carbon investments up to that point, but an additional $5 trillion would then need to be invested through to 2035 to get back on track." The latest IPCC findings will be a key discussion topic for world leaders at a September 23, 2014 Climate Summit in New York City, hosted by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. The summit aims to mobilize political will to pave the way for an ambitious global legal climate agreement to be signed at the critical December 2015 Conference of Parties (COP) negotiations in Paris.

Links
Associated Press coverage of the IPCC Part 2 report.

New Blockbuster IPCC Climate Report: Comprehensive, Authoritative, Conservative, my September 2013 post on who the IPCC is, and how they write their reports.

Landmark 2013 IPCC Report: 95% Chance Most of Global Warming is Human-Caused, my September 2013 post on Part I of the 2013 - 2014 IPCC report.


Video 1. The IPCC released this video to accompany today's release of their 2014 Impacts and Adaptation report.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting 572. pottery:
HAHAHAHAHAHAH, this is very clever !
An April Fool joke, and very good.

It looks like rain, it feels like rain, it tastes like rain even.

I wonder how they did it ?
HAARP?.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18687
Quoting 572. pottery:
HAHAHAHAHAHAH, this is very clever !
An April Fool joke, and very good.

It looks like rain, it feels like rain, it tastes like rain even.

I wonder how they did it ?


Squirrel's and Seeding?
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 563. Neapolitan:
Cropt the image, rotate it 180 degrees, and...and...I knew it!!!

666


666

Super Duper Doomness ?
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
HAHAHAHAHAHAH, this is very clever !
An April Fool joke, and very good.

It looks like rain, it feels like rain, it tastes like rain even.

I wonder how they did it ?
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 25221
Carry me down to the Sea,...
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
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Quoting 554. georgevandenberghe:

2007 was hot. 2003 and 1996 were rather cool (which in DC means
not as miserably hot as the miserable normal)

The first half of spring 2003 wasn't too bad. It was the most rotten cold miserable wet second half of spring (to mid June) I've experienced in the DC area in my memory (which previous posts have demonstrated does
have faults). I picked my first sweetcorn June 27, that year, record late.

Mr almanac I remember it being hot.Especially in July and the beginning of August.I don't remember 1996 being cool as the only relief was from remnants of storms and Fran running up the coast.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18687
JB has some interesting thoughts about this years hurricane season. 8 to 10 named storms, 3 to 5 hurricanes, and 1 to 2 majors. JB thinks FL to Maine maybe in trouble this year as storms should form close to home which I tend to agree. He also thinks this years hurricane season could mimic the 1950's and 1960's which featured numerous hurricane hits on FL, NC, and New England those decades.

Very interesting and I tend to agree with his reasoning here.


Although overall numbers were low we had many significant hits on the eastern seaboard those years.

Could see something like this, this year. Hurricane
Donna had hurricane force winds from FL to Maine which is something we haven't seen since.


Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 10 Comments: 5451
Quoting 558. Patrap:
GFS upgrade for 2014



I remember these machines. Too funny, I hope they aren't using tubes in any of their equipment.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6438
Quoting 563. Neapolitan:
Cropt the image, rotate it 180 degrees, and...and...I knew it!!!

666

I feel like I should go listen to some Zepp albums in reverse now. :P
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 552. LargoFl:
are you feeling the quakes in your area?


Not since the 4.1 the other day, they are small and I am out of range of the small ones...
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6438
Quoting 562. Ossqss:
To those who rebut model accuracy here is just one example. Enjoy some facts.

Funny that Uber-Denialist Curry would use a graphic from Hawkins. Here's another of his:

heat
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Quoting 561. Patrap:


1600 X 1200


Three Atmospheric 'Dragons': Low Pressure Areas Around the U.S.
There are three low pressure systems around the U.S. and they resemble dragons on satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite image from March 31, 2014 shows the low pressure systems in the eastern Pacific Ocean, over the nation's Heartland, and in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

All three lows have the signature comma shape that make them appear to be curled up dragons.
According to the National Weather Service, the low pressure area approaching the northwestern U.S. is expected to bring rainfall to the coast and areas of snow that stretch from western Washington state south toward the four corners region.

The low in the middle of the country is located over Nebraska and dropping snow to the north and west of it. That same low is bringing rain from southern Minnesota south to eastern Texas. Meanwhile, the third low pressure system is bringing rain and snow to parts of New England.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite sits in a fixed orbit in space capturing visible and infrared imagery of all weather over the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean.

The data to create this image was taken on March 31, 2014 at 17:45 UTC/1:45 p.m. EDT by NOAA's GOES-East or GOES-13 satellite and made into an image by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.


Image Credit: NASA/Caption: Rob Gutro
Crop the image, rotate it 180 degrees, and...and...I knew it!!!

666
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To those who rebut model accuracy here is just one example. Enjoy some facts.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:


1600 X 1200


Three Atmospheric 'Dragons': Low Pressure Areas Around the U.S.
There are three low pressure systems around the U.S. and they resemble dragons on satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite image from March 31, 2014 shows the low pressure systems in the eastern Pacific Ocean, over the nation's Heartland, and in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

All three lows have the signature comma shape that make them appear to be curled up dragons.
According to the National Weather Service, the low pressure area approaching the northwestern U.S. is expected to bring rainfall to the coast and areas of snow that stretch from western Washington state south toward the four corners region.

The low in the middle of the country is located over Nebraska and dropping snow to the north and west of it. That same low is bringing rain from southern Minnesota south to eastern Texas. Meanwhile, the third low pressure system is bringing rain and snow to parts of New England.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite sits in a fixed orbit in space capturing visible and infrared imagery of all weather over the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean.

The data to create this image was taken on March 31, 2014 at 17:45 UTC/1:45 p.m. EDT by NOAA's GOES-East or GOES-13 satellite and made into an image by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.


Image Credit: NASA/Caption: Rob Gutro
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 558. Patrap:
GFS upgrade for 2014



Just in time for Hurricane Season! LOL
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 10 Comments: 5451
Quoting LargoFl:
are you feeling the quakes in your area?

No one's going to feel anything under a 3.0 unless they are with a mile or so of the epicenter, Largo.
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GFS upgrade for 2014

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 537. LargoFl:
actually the whole world doesnt matter,if winter becomes longer in northern canada and northern usa over the decades to come..a new beginning just might begin..a beginning i myself dont want to see..i hate the cold lol


So far in the past 30 years the trend has been for shorter with early meltout and late onset in fall. The strongest onset delay signal is on the Arctic coast where more water, later into early fall, is delaying cooling.


I hate the heat. I'm seeing my nightmare!
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 2589
Large scale urban reforestation programs include New York City's Million Tree Initiative,[6] and TreePeople in Los Angeles, which planted 1 million trees in preparation for the 1984 Summer Olympics and continued planting thereafter.[1]

Grassroots efforts include Friends of the Urban Forest in San Francisco which advocates the planting of street trees[1] and the Urban Reforestation organization in Australia, which focuses on sustainable living in urban places.[2]
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
WWW.GLOBALINCIDENTMAP.COM

Type: EarthQuake
2 hours ago
Magnitude: 2.8
DateTime: 2014-04-01 08:02:49
Region: Greater Los Angeles area, California
Depth: 0.8
Source: USGS Feed
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
Quoting 489. washingtonian115:
So far with the signals I'm getting this April is looking like 1996,2003,and 2007.Interestingly enough all were hot summers in D.C.However a neutral or la nina was in place.This year it's looking like a El nino.Mmmm.

2007 was hot. 2003 and 1996 were rather cool (which in DC means
not as miserably hot as the miserable normal)

The first half of spring 2003 wasn't too bad. It was the most rotten cold miserable wet second half of spring (to mid June) I've experienced in the DC area in my memory (which previous posts have demonstrated does
have faults). I picked my first sweetcorn June 27, that year, record late.

Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 2589
The nhc has •Re-analysis of 1969's Hurricane Camille Completed (PDF) they have downgraded the winds from 190mph two 175mph and lower the Mb two 900mb from 909mb
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Quoting 548. PedleyCA:
Good Morning Peeps, we got a bit of rain here. I heard it start about 3:45 and it didn't last long. Both PWS near here say .02, I checked KRAL and it doesn't show anything, not even a trace but it did indicate light rain. Currently 55.1F
are you feeling the quakes in your area?
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
Climate Model Indications and the Observed Climate


Simulated global temperature in experiments that include human influences (pink line), and model experiments that included only natural factors (blue line). The black line is observed temperature change.


Global climate models clearly show the effect of human-induced changes on global temperatures. The blue band shows how global temperatures would have changed due to natural forces only (without human influence).

The pink band shows model projections of the effects of human and natural forces combined. The black line shows actual observed global average temperatures. The close match between the black line and the pink band indicates that observed warming over the last half-century cannot be explained by natural factors alone, and is instead caused primarily by human factors.




..when yer outta the Blue, and into the Pink, you can come back'
Hey, Hey, my, my...


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting drs2008:
Nea, I think what these folks are missing is that there is indeed a transfer of heat into the oceans. There is no pause,only an attempt by mother nature to redistribute heat. Incidentially,I believe we are already beyond the tipping point and the species will now be culled.

I was under the impression from reading the obituaries today the species are already being culled.
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Good Morning Peeps, we got a bit of rain here. I heard it start about 3:45 and it didn't last long. Both PWS near here say .02, I checked KRAL and it doesn't show anything, not even a trace but it did indicate light rain. Currently 55.1F
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6438


Cyclone Helen Skirts Madagascar
Cyclone Helen is spinning in the Mozambique Channel between Madagascar and the African continent. Shown here in this Suomi NPP satellite image taken on March 30th, 2014 while the storm was near its peak Category 2 intensity, Cyclone Helen has since weakened while skirting the Madagascar coast. The forecast path will take the storm west into Mozambique as a tropical storm over the next few days.
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Forests play an important an important role in climate change. The destruction and degradation of forests contributes to the problem through the release of CO2. But the planting of new forests can help mitigate against climate change by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Combined with the sun's energy, the captured carbon is converted into trunks, branches, roots and leaves via the process of photosynthesis. It is stored in this "biomass" until being returned back into the atmosphere, whether through natural processes or human interference, thus completing the carbon cycle.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
How much Oxygen Does one tree produce?....Link
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http://www.arborday.org/programs/treecityusa/map.cf m
Open link click on your state to see a list of Tree Cities.
Quoting 536. LargoFl:
thants good news i would hope more cities become one too.



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Quoting 541. Patrap:


Making one of the O's a 8' drives the NRO, NSA nuts is my cover.

: P


lol. I figure around ten months my VIN will look like binary code.
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Global Climate Change Indicators

Introduction Warming Climate Human Influence

More Information

How do we know the Earth's climate is warming?

Thousands of land and ocean temperature measurements are recorded each day around the globe. This includes measurements from climate reference stations, weather stations, ships, buoys and autonomous gliders in the oceans. These surface measurements are also supplemented with satellite measurements.

These measurements are processed, examined for random and systematic errors, and then finally combined to produce a time series of global average temperature change. A number of agencies around the world have produced datasets of global-scale changes in surface temperature using different techniques to process the data and remove measurement errors that could lead to false interpretations of temperature trends.

The warming trend that is apparent in all of the independent methods of calculating global temperature change is also confirmed by other independent observations, such as the melting of mountain glaciers on every continent, reductions in the extent of snow cover, earlier blooming of plants in spring, a shorter ice season on lakes and rivers, ocean heat content, reduced arctic sea ice, and rising sea levels.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 539. calkevin77:


I haven't washed my car in over six months. I can't even read the VIN number from two feet away.


Making one of the O's a 8' drives the NRO, NSA nuts is my cover.

: P
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
American forests.org.................Link
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Quoting 503. Xyrus2000:


Not only that, but when the focus a microwave beam off the main deflector dish they can control any humans within a 1 mile radius! That's why I never take my tinfoil hat off!

Common guys, at least try to keep things within the realm of possibility here.

Let's say you have a satellite 400 miles up (LEO) and you want to read something like a VIN off a dashboard. Using the Rayleigh formula:

r=(1.22)l/d

r is the angular resolution, l is the wavelength of light, and d is the diameter of the lens in radians. We want an angular resolution to resolve a VIN from orbit, so that's approximately .005m/643738m (size of object over distance away from object, in meters) or approximately 7.7e-9. We'll use the midpoint of the visible spectrum for wavelength. Solving for d:

d=(1.22)(5e-7m)/7.7e-9= 79.2 m

The Hubble Space Telescope has a 2.4 meter primary mirror. The James Web Telescope has a 6.5 meter primary mirror. The largest observatory mirror on Earth is 10.4m.

So basically, you'd need to orbit something 8 times the size of the largest observatory mirror on Earth in order to resolve a VIN from 400 miles up. And that's not including all the adaptive optics hardware you'd need in order to even get a clear picture, or the extremely fine motor control and gyroscopes you'd need to follow a moving target on the surface.

In other words, it doesn't exist. And if it did exist it certainly wouldn't be a secret as you'd be able to easily see it from Earth (it'd be on the same order of size as the International Space Station).


I haven't washed my car in over six months. I can't even read the VIN number from two feet away.
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O Lordy, Part 2 ?
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 532. Neapolitan:


That is categorically not happening. Yes, parts of eastern North America have had a cold late winter/early spring. But eastern North America isn't the planet. Here, have a look at this global temperature anomaly map for the last month:

temps

...or even this one for yesterday:

temps

TLDR: US =/= World

actually the whole world doesnt matter,if winter becomes longer in northern canada and northern usa over the decades to come..a new beginning just might begin..a beginning i myself dont want to see..i hate the cold lol
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
Quoting 533. fireflymom:
Houston is a tree city, damp and warm here today hoping for rain.

thants good news i would hope more cities become one too.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888
A sad testimony to the un forgiving Pain Nuclear Power can cause a whole region.

Post Quake/Tsunami 3 years now..and these people are still evacuee's.




Fukushima Survivors Torn About Whether To Return To 'Hot Zone'

Reuters | by Mari Saito

Posted: 04/01/2014 4:22 am EDT


TAMURA, Japan, April 1 (Reuters) - People in Japan on Tuesday began their first homecomings in three years to a small area evacuated after the Fukushima disaster, but families are divided as worries about radiation and poor job prospects have kept many away.

The reopening of the Miyakoji area of Tamura, a city 220 km (140 miles) northeast of Tokyo and inland from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear station, marks a tiny step for Japan as it attempts to recover from the 2011 disasters.

But the event is a major milestone for the 357 registered residents of the district. The trickle of returnees highlights both people's desire to return to the forested hamlet and the difficulty of returning to normal.

"Many of our friends and neighbours won't come back," said Kimiko Koyama, 69, speaking on her return to the large farmhouse she had occupied for 50 years, while her husband Toshio, 72, tried to fix a television antenna on the roof.

"There are no jobs. It's inconvenient and young people are scared of radiation," she said. "My daughter won't bring our grandsons here because of the radiation."

Miyakoji, set amid rolling hills and rice paddies, has been off-limits to most residents since March 2011, when the government ordered evacuations after a devastating earthquake and tsunami triggered a triple meltdown at the power plant on the Pacific coast about 20 km (12 miles) away.

"The evacuation period was long, but I am happy that we can finally return home," said Tamura Mayor Yukei Tomitsuka. "For Tamura and its families, this is a fresh start."


THIRTY MINUTES TO PLAY

It is the first area in the 20-km (12-mile) Fukushima exclusion zone to be reopened as decontamination was completed, paving the way for more towns to be resettled.

The government had planned to lift the Miyakoji ban in late October but opposition by residents delayed the move.

A few cars streamed into the town, where several TV news vans were set up. Some elderly women sat by the roadside, but there were no children or families in sight outside.

Schools open later this week, but seven children came to the local pre-school and four older children were also dropped off, as volunteers from nuclear plant operator Tokyo Electric Power removed ice and snow and levelled the playground.

Children in temporary homes outside the evacuation zone got 30 minutes to play outdoors each day, but how long they will spend outdoors now they are home has yet to be decided.

"We explain to them, 'There are bad germs outside and if you stay out too long, the germs will get inside your body,'" one teacher said. "Most of them understand."

The 2011 crisis forced more than 160,000 people from towns near the Fukushima plant to evacuate. About a third still live in temporary housing across the prefecture, their lives on hold as they wait for Japan to finish decontamination.

Kitaro Saito, who is in his early 60s, will stay outside Miyakoji, despite wanting to return to his large hillside house there, because he thinks the government is using residents as "guinea pigs" to test if more people can return home.

"Relatives are arguing over what to do," he said, warming his hands outside his temporary home among rows of other one-room trailers. "The town will be broken up."


RADIATION RISK

Japan's $30 billion cleanup of radioactive fallout around Fukushima is behind schedule and not expected to achieve the long-term radiation reduction goal - 1 millisievert per year - set by the previous administration.

Across Fukushima prefecture, hundreds of workers are still scraping top soil, cutting leaves and branches off trees and hosing down houses to lower radiation levels.

Radiation levels in Miyakoji ranged from 0.11 microsieverts to 0.48 microsieverts per hour, February readings show.

That was higher than the average 0.034 microsieverts per hour measured in central Tokyo on Monday, but comparable to background radiation of about 0.2 microsieverts per hour in Denver. A commercial flight between Tokyo and New York exposes passengers to about 10 microsieverts per hour.

People exposed to radiation typically have a higher chance of getting cancer if doses exceed 100 millisieverts (100,000 microsieverts), the World Health Organisation says.

Tuesday's homecoming is particularly difficult, as many residents worked at the Fukushima plant before the disaster and depended on Tepco for stable jobs.

"It was the only job out here and we were grateful," said Kimiko Koyama. "We worked hard to feed our three daughters. We worked and we built our life here."

The Koyamas, who helped to build the very nuclear reactors that have displaced them from their homes, are letting the city keep radioactive debris in an empty lot on their land in a bid to hasten the cleanup. (Reporting by Mari Saito; Editing by William Mallard, Mike Collett-White and Clarence Fernandez)
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Houston is a tree city, damp and warm here today hoping for rain.
Quoting 531. LargoFl:
my city is a tree city..is yours?..if not get involved...........Link

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Quoting 499. LargoF:


you young ones..the next several decades,watch the seasons..see if winter and cold..lasts just a tad longer each several seasons..on and on..just a tad longer til you start to notice,,winter is slowly making into even may...slowly,each year just a lil more..


That is categorically not happening. Yes, parts of eastern North America have had a cold late winter/early spring. But eastern North America isn't the planet. Here, have a look at this global temperature anomaly map for the last month:

temps

...or even this one for yesterday:

temps

TLDR: US =/= World

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my city is a tree city..is yours?..if not get involved...........Link
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O Lordy...
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
I was interested in the talk in here yesterday about reforestation..well today as i was checking my grass..i see new baby oak tree's sprouting and it hit me..IF people are really interested in replanting tree's...encourage the squirrels...yes squirrels..they are the forest replenishers..they eat a tree seed..then they take another one and bury it..that buried seed becomes a new tree...encourage them, dont chase them away...and best of all...there is NO expense in reforestation..the squirrels do it for free huh.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 43888

U.N. draft sounds alarm as world looks set to miss emissions target



BY ALISTER DOYLE, ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT
OSLO Tue Apr 1, 2014 7:06pm IST


(Reuters) - The world will need far tougher curbs on greenhouse gases, by both developed nations and emerging economies, to keep global warming from exceeding a promised ceiling, a draft U.N. report shows.

Rich nations led by the United States would have to halve their emissions by 2030 from 2010 levels to keep warming below an agreed 2 degree Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) ceiling above pre-industrial times, according to the draft obtained by Reuters.

Asia, including China and India, would have to limit emissions to around 2010 levels by 2030 as part of a global shareout, a tough goal for countries that say they need to burn more fossil fuels to help end poverty.

"Stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations will require large-scale transformations in human societies," according to chapter 6 of a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) due for release in Berlin in mid-April.

Most governments are not planning such tough curbs, fearing they would be economically crippling. Temperatures are on track to exceed the ceiling, set by almost 200 nations in 2010, of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times.

Even so, the curbs mark a shift in debate about climate change, which has focused most on action by rich emitters.

"The implications for all the big emitters are pretty stark," said Alden Meyer, of the Union of Concerned Scientists. "All of them now have something to worry about." Like others interviewed, he had not seen the draft.

Developing nations have often quoted the previous IPCC report, in 2007, which said industrialized nations should cut emissions by between 25 and 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020. It did not outline such clear goals for emerging nations.

Cuts by the rich are well short of 25-40 percent. The European Union, the most ambitious of big rich nations, is considering cuts of 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

ILL-PREPARED

The Berlin report about solving climate change follows an IPCC report about impacts of warming issued in Japan on Monday that said the world was in many cases ill-prepared for severe and perhaps irreversible change.

Monday's IPCC report said that climate change was affecting all parts of the globe and could damage food production, brake economic growth and even aggravate armed conflicts.

The reports will guide work on a deal to combat climate change due to be agreed at a summit in Paris in late 2015.

Under the IPCC scenario, former Soviet bloc nations would have to cut emissions by a third by 2030 from 2010, Latin America would have to cut overall while the Middle East and Africa could raise emissions slightly.

It does not set goals for individual nations, only groups.

An alternative is to let temperatures overshoot the 2 degrees Celsius target rise while developing technology to cool the planet, such as extracting greenhouse gases from the air, the draft says.

But overshoot is controversial, especially among poor nations most at risk from heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising seas. Also, new technologies may not work.

Marlene Moses, chair of the Alliance of Small Island States that groups some of the most vulnerable nations, said technologies exist for rapid cuts in emissions with a shift to renewable energies from fossil fuels.

Cuts in emissions "also help reduce poverty, improve public health, and build energy, food, and water security for vulnerable communities," she told Reuters.

The IPCC says that it is at least 95 percent probable that human activities, rather than natural variations in the climate, are the dominant cause of recent climate change. Opinion polls show that voters in many nations are far less certain.

(Reporting By Alister Doyle; Editing by Tom Heneghan)


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Portlight is asking bloggers to blog about emergency preparedness and people with disabilities and then share your blog on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #ruready.



R U Ready? Sheltering in Place and Evacuation for the Disabled
By: Portlight, 9:10 PM CDT on March 31, 2014


This guide is a starting point to personally prepare for a disaster. More information will be needed depending on the type of hazard and one's functional needs. There is a tendency to avoid thinking about emergencies, and this can produce greater consequences for people with disabilities than for people without disabilities.

It is extremely important that in any emergency one is able to shelter in place for at least 72 hours before rescue personnel arrive. It should also be understood that personal preparedness is a process rather than an endpoint, so ongoing considerations need to be taken in order to ensure safety. This fact sheet contains suggested guidelines that may vary depending on one's own personal health preparedness capabilities
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 430 Comments: 130817
Quoting 506. washingtonian115:
According to the Doom and Gloom model at hour 5000 Miami is about to get slammed by a cat 5 while Galveston is currently being bulldozed.


Most intelligent people realize that this model has a fast bias and landfall is most likely at hour 5032.
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 2589
Quoting 518. Neapolitan:
0.16"? Why, that should erase the last lingering vestiges of the drought, eh? :\

Seriously, the HPC says much of Californa needs between about 18" and 47" of rain over the next six months to alleviate the drought. So after yesterday, you're between 0.89% and 0.34% of the way there. Keep it up!

drought


The problem is, much of Southern California only average about 12 inches in the low lands and a little over 20 in some mountain slopes. Sadly, they would need record breaking rains to offset this...

They do need El Nino. Although the question is, will the mudslides be worth it?
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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