Save the Keeling Curve!

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:13 PM GMT on March 11, 2014

Share this Blog
64
+

Climate change's most iconic research project is in danger--a victim of budget cuts in an era of increased government belt-tightening. The Keeling Curve is a measurement of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere made atop Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, begun in 1958 by Dr. Charles Keeling. It is the longest-running such measurement in the world. The curve was instrumental in showing how human emissions of carbon dioxide were steadily accumulating in Earth's atmosphere, and raised awareness that human-caused climate change was an ever-increasing threat to the stability of our climate. After Keeling's death in 2005, the measurements were continued by his son, Ralph F. Keeling. Support from NSF, NOAA and NASA is being diminished or withdrawn, and Keeling has turned to crowd-funding to help raise funds to continue these important measurements. I hope you can join me in making a donation.


Figure 1. The Keeling Curve: climate change's most iconic image. The curve's steady year-by-year increase in CO2 due to burning of coal, oil, and natural gas has wriggles on top of it, due to the natural seasonal cycle in CO2--plants suck in CO2 during the Northern Hemisphere growing season, then release it during the winter. Image credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USCD.


Figure 2. Dr. Charles Keeling posing at the entrance to the Charles Keeling Building at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

CO2 Levels Hit 401 ppm
The latest data from the Keeling curve website shows that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are surging upwards in their usual late winter push, as plants return CO2 to the atmosphere before the Northern Hemisphere spring growing season hits. CO2 levels reached 401 ppm (parts per million) last week on top of Mauna Loa, setting a new record. CO2 levels were at 280 ppm in 1870, increased less than 1 ppm per year in the 1960s, then accelerated to 2 ppm per year during the 2000s. Less than 1% of the increase since 1870 has been due to natural sources, such as volcanoes. The last time carbon dioxide levels reached 400 ppm—between 2.5 and 5 million years ago during the Pliocene Era—the Earth was 3.5 to 9° F warmer (2 to 5° C), and sea levels were 65 to 80 feet higher.

Links
There is a hashtag #savetheKeelingCurve
Eli Rabett's post, Shaking the Cup for Science
What Does 400 ppm Look Like? December 2013 blog post by Robert Monroe of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.




Senate holds all-nighter on climate change
A group of 31 U.S. Senators pulled an all-nighter last night on the floor of the U.S. Senate, taking turns from 9 pm Monday night until 9 am Tuesday morning to promote policy actions on climate change. Many of the Senators involved issued tweets using the hashtag #Up4Climate. The all-nighter was another indication that politicians are becoming increasingly bold about speaking up on climate change.

Latest Version of our WunderMap App Now Includes WunderPhotos
Weather Underground has released today a new version of our WunderMap app for iPhone and iPad. The main new feature that we'd like to highlight is the WunderPhotos layer--now users can view, share, and submit photos all from within the app. Here are a few of the features of the new version of the WunderMap app:

◦ Improved Weather Station display, and both station size and station spacing are now adjustable (Weather Stations Layer ⇒ Settings).
◦ New WunderPhotos layer! View, share, and submit beautiful weather photos.
◦ Fixed incorrect elevation for some Personal Weather Stations.
◦ Swipe-to-delete search history items.
◦ "Terrain/Satellite” and other map options made more prominent.
◦ Bug fixes (crashes, visual glitches, and usability enhancements).
◦ Optimized performance across all devices.


The latest version is available to download for iPhone and iPad at https://itunes.apple.com/app/wundermap/id364884105?mt=8.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 707 - 657

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21Blog Index

Cold, gray and windy after 3 days of warm, sunny spring conditions... :(
A good time to whip up some 'kitchen sink' soup! (can you guess how many ingredients are in this???)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 662. sar2401:

Or in the wrong area. I can't understand why there hasn't been a completed computer analysis of the radar track by now. In my experience, it never took longer than two days for this. Of course, those analysis were conducted by the FAA and, in some cases, the DOD. I have no idea on how Malaysia is handling this. Except for search efforts, I haven't seen any evidence they are asking for international help.

An issue which is like the elephant behind the curtain is that Malaysia is a Muslim country. 65% of the population is Muslim, and the state religion is Muslim. I hope this isn't playing a part in asking for help from Western countries,but I suspect it is, along with the usual issues of national pride.


Ummm...has anyone checked the Maldives Islands!? If you go DUE WEST from that last point of contact, they could theoretically fly right into the southern islands and land. There are 2 small airports there and I think they are under Islamic rule. With the remaining fuel, it would take them 5.3 hours to get there, assuming 330 mph all the way. They could have flown in dark! That is my theory.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GTstormChaserCaleb:
Is Tennessee considered the SE United States though?

Good question. South Tennesee surely is. North Tennessee, probably not. Astrometeor would know better than me.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
704. VR46L
Quoting 681. Ameister12:

Here you go!
I'm Adam B. by the way.


Hey I notice where you are Dooming ... SE Texas , Tampa.... and the Panhandle gets only a glancing blow !
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
703. JeffMasters (Admin)
Quoting 665. sar2401:


EDIT: I didn't see in your post that these donations are meant to keep 12 sites going. Is this the case?


Yes, the Scripps CO2 measurement program is done at 12 sites, not just Mauna Loa, and there is no way to target a donation just to maintaining the Mauna Loa site. Since I asked Dr. Keeling about the funding, and he did not respond, I assume that he is not comfortable sharing the details. I agree that it would be nice to know those numbers before making a donation; this was one nice feature of last year's DarkSnow crowd-funded Greenland research project.

Dr. M.
Quoting 695. ricderr:


Even with above average rainfall in FL recently there are still signs from the 2010 drought here in FL especially in the Deltona area of SW Volusia County where water levels are very low in that area as well as in Winter Garden in western Orange County.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 689. GTstormChaserCaleb:
Hang on a sec. Scott, while others may benefit, some will be at a disadvantage.

"The Return of El Nino
By Meteorologist Erik Taylor
By etaylor@wbbjtv.com
Story Created: Mar 11, 2014 at 5:17 PM CDT
Story Updated: Mar 11, 2014 at 7:24 PM CDT
EAST JACKSON -- Not too long ago, we experienced our first threat of severe weather and a disruptive winter storm that dropped more than 3 inches of snow and 6 inches of sleet in some areas.

So what’s up with this crazy weather pattern and could we expect a similar pattern next year?

"It was crazy all that snow and ice. And it was so cold then it got up in like the 60s and the 70s. Its like what is going on." Jackson resident Linda Kilprtirck, says.

This year by all accounts, we experienced a pretty bad winter. We had record breaking cold, a wicked ice storm, and even our first taste of damaging severe weather.

"Well I don't like it but it seems like we just bounce around like a yo-yo around here so. I just kind of take it in stride. You never know what to wear." Jackson resident Candi Stricklin, says.

Next winter should be different because El Nino returns. El Nino is not a hurricane or a type of storm. It's simply a weather pattern where warmer ocean temperatures across the Pacific alter the global weather pattern including right here in West Tennessee.

"Most pronounced effects of El Nino occur during the winter time. So this is something that were looking to develop this summer and getting into this next winter. With it you can see definite effects when it comes to precipitation." Ben Schott, Warning Coordinator Meteorologist at NWS Memphis, said.

The good news is that hurricane season won't be as strong and more above average temperatures can be expected across the region. The bad news is there won't be as much rain which could cause drought conditions and higher food prices right here in West Tennessee.

Forecasters say that this is a broad prediction to what will really happen. So if you like the warmer weather and dislike the snow, this will be something you should continue to watch as we get into Summer and Fall."

Link

Also, I would like to point out to this meteorologist, he probably knows, that just because the hurricane season won't be above normal, doesn't necessarily mean it won't be a strong one. A reminder to him and all of us, "it only takes one."


However there is much more agr. across California & Texas. I spoke to a client a few weeks back that lives in Austin and they said water levels at all the nearby lakes are at very low levels still even with near average rainfall lately. Ricderr will love this as well as when was the last time El-Paso saw flooding? 4 years I believe it was so even the Deserts will benefit from this years El-Nino.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 698. washingtonian115:
So today I had the builders come over to do some fix'ins before the server weather season really kicks in.Turns out there was a extra room in my house that was sealed off by the original owner and appears it hasn't been open in 80 years.Sure enough they made a door opening and the pantry was stuck in time!.Some old vases and pots.A old teddy bear cookie jar.The original shelves still remain.In terms of weather winds are 26 gusting to 40 with cloudy conditions.The rain is moving in shortly.


That is just crazy Washi... Look for cans of gold coins.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
698. washingtonian115 2:55 PM EDT on March 12, 2014

Make sure to check those jars/vases for any gold coins wrapped in wax paper.................... :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
So today I had the builders come over to do some fix'ins before the server weather season really kicks in.Turns out there was a extra room in my house that was sealed off by the original owner and appears it hasn't been open in 80 years.Sure enough they made a door opening and the pantry was stuck in time!.Some old vases and pots.A old teddy bear cookie jar.The original shelves still remain.In terms of weather winds are 26 gusting to 40 with cloudy conditions.The rain is moving in shortly.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16971
Heavy Snow Likely for Midwest, Northeast, and Canada

A late Winter snow storm is moving through the northeastern part of the United States, potentially dumping up to 24 inches of snow on already snow-weary parts of the country. Winter Storm Warnings are posted for the Midwest and Northeast, and blizzard conditions are possible. Conditions Worsen Across Midwest and Northeast
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 15 Comments: 30782
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 691. sar2401:

Wait. I was under the impression that a strong El Nino meant warmer but wetter weather for the SE United States. Is that wrong?
Is Tennessee considered the SE United States though?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 681. Ameister12:

Here you go!
I'm Adam B. by the way.


You got my vote...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GTstormChaserCaleb:
Hang on a sec. Scott, while others may benefit, some will be at a disadvantage.

"The Return of El Nino
By Meteorologist Erik Taylor
By etaylor@wbbjtv.com
Story Created: Mar 11, 2014 at 5:17 PM CDT
Story Updated: Mar 11, 2014 at 7:24 PM CDT
EAST JACKSON -- Not too long ago, we experienced our first threat of severe weather and a disruptive winter storm that dropped more than 3 inches of snow and 6 inches of sleet in some areas.

So what’s up with this crazy weather pattern and could we expect a similar pattern next year?

"It was crazy all that snow and ice. And it was so cold then it got up in like the 60s and the 70s. Its like what is going on." Jackson resident Linda Kilprtirck, says.

This year by all accounts, we experienced a pretty bad winter. We had record breaking cold, a wicked ice storm, and even our first taste of damaging severe weather.

"Well I don't like it but it seems like we just bounce around like a yo-yo around here so. I just kind of take it in stride. You never know what to wear." Jackson resident Candi Stricklin, says.

Next winter should be different because El Nino returns. El Nino is not a hurricane or a type of storm. It's simply a weather pattern where warmer ocean temperatures across the Pacific alter the global weather pattern including right here in West Tennessee.

"Most pronounced effects of El Nino occur during the winter time. So this is something that were looking to develop this summer and getting into this next winter. With it you can see definite effects when it comes to precipitation." Ben Schott, Warning Coordinator Meteorologist at NWS Memphis, said.

The good news is that hurricane season won't be as strong and more above average temperatures can be expected across the region. The bad news is there won't be as much rain which could cause drought conditions and higher food prices right here in West Tennessee.

Forecasters say that this is a broad prediction to what will really happen. So if you like the warmer weather and dislike the snow, this will be something you should continue to watch as we get into Summer and Fall."

Link

Also, I would like to point out to this meteorologist, he probably knows, that just because the hurricane season won't be above normal, doesn't necessarily mean it won't be a strong one. A reminder to him and all of us, "it only takes one."

Wait. I was under the impression that a strong El Nino meant warmer but wetter weather for the SE United States. Is that wrong?
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting 688. wxchaser97:
Detroit has broke the 90" mark with this storm. 90.6" is the seasonal total through 2pm. Most of the snow is over so not much more will probably be added. Winds are gusting to 35mph or more at times and blowing snow has become a real problem. Over 800 schools/districts where closed today due to the winter storm.

NWS Detroit winter stats


Got a new high snow mark to beat next year...
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
Quoting 671. StormTrackerScott:
The sub surface warm pool that we all have been tracking is now getting much larger. This is a really good indicator that this years El-Nino will be a big one. People from California to Texas are really hoping this pans out as Texas is still in the a midst of a major drought which really has never been able to shake since 2011.

Hang on a sec. Scott, while others may benefit, some will be at a disadvantage.

"The Return of El Nino
By Meteorologist Erik Taylor
By etaylor@wbbjtv.com
Story Created: Mar 11, 2014 at 5:17 PM CDT
Story Updated: Mar 11, 2014 at 7:24 PM CDT
EAST JACKSON -- Not too long ago, we experienced our first threat of severe weather and a disruptive winter storm that dropped more than 3 inches of snow and 6 inches of sleet in some areas.

So what’s up with this crazy weather pattern and could we expect a similar pattern next year?

"It was crazy all that snow and ice. And it was so cold then it got up in like the 60s and the 70s. Its like what is going on." Jackson resident Linda Kilprtirck, says.

This year by all accounts, we experienced a pretty bad winter. We had record breaking cold, a wicked ice storm, and even our first taste of damaging severe weather.

"Well I don't like it but it seems like we just bounce around like a yo-yo around here so. I just kind of take it in stride. You never know what to wear." Jackson resident Candi Stricklin, says.

Next winter should be different because El Nino returns. El Nino is not a hurricane or a type of storm. It's simply a weather pattern where warmer ocean temperatures across the Pacific alter the global weather pattern including right here in West Tennessee.

"Most pronounced effects of El Nino occur during the winter time. So this is something that were looking to develop this summer and getting into this next winter. With it you can see definite effects when it comes to precipitation." Ben Schott, Warning Coordinator Meteorologist at NWS Memphis, said.

The good news is that hurricane season won't be as strong and more above average temperatures can be expected across the region. The bad news is there won't be as much rain which could cause drought conditions and higher food prices right here in West Tennessee.

Forecasters say that this is a broad prediction to what will really happen. So if you like the warmer weather and dislike the snow, this will be something you should continue to watch as we get into Summer and Fall."

Link

Also, I would like to point out to this meteorologist, he probably knows, that just because the hurricane season won't be above normal, doesn't necessarily mean it won't be a strong one. A reminder to him and all of us, "it only takes one."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Detroit has broke the 90" mark with this storm. 90.6" is the seasonal total through 2pm. Most of the snow is over so not much more will probably be added. Winds are gusting to 35mph or more at times and blowing snow has become a real problem. Over 800 schools/districts where closed today due to the winter storm.

NWS Detroit winter stats
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 684. Torito:


Alright. voted. "form has been sent."

Thank you very much! :D
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
686. yoboi
Quoting 683. Naga5000:


The heat release is going to be absurd when that warm pool surfaces. I'm very interested to see how the effects of this el nino compare to others.



Who knows it might last 18 yrs......
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
nasty storm for the northeast tomorrow.....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 681. Ameister12:

Here you go!
I'm Adam B. by the way.


Alright. voted. "form has been sent."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 671. StormTrackerScott:
The sub surface warm pool that we all have been tracking is now getting much larger. This is a really good indicator that this years El-Nino will be a big one. People from California to Texas are really hoping this pans out as Texas is still in the a midst of a major drought which really has never been able to shake since 2011.



The heat release is going to be absurd when that warm pool surfaces. I'm very interested to see how the effects of this el nino compare to others.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3378
Quoting 677. Torito:


Link? I might vote.

Here you go!
I'm Adam B. by the way.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting LargoFl:
thank them for giving us good updates on the severe storms.

Indeed. They have done an excellent job of nailing the Florida storms this winter.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
prayers for those who lost their lives today in that horrible gas explosion that took out two whole apartment buildings in NYC..babies,mothers and fathers they are going to be pulling out of that rubble up there..just horrible.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ameister12:

Don't worry about it. I think you can vote only once anyways.

I was never able to vote the first time...I think. The error occured after I voted so maybe the vote got through. Anyway, I'm sure no one from Tampa is voting for you. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting 668. Ameister12:
Good afternoon everybody!

Overnight, I went from zero to 14 votes in Force-13's contest and I'm now in the lead! That's really awesome! I really, really appreciate all the votes, guys! It means a lot. :D


Link? I might vote.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
We've got the same crazy temperature gradient across Alabama that we've seen so many times this season. It's 47 in Huntsville, 54 in Birmingham, 68 in Montgomery, and 72 in Eufaula. The low last night was another bust, with only .10" of rain. The front itself is draped right across Alabama in a NE-SW orientation. The front looks dry, so no rain from that, just temperatures near freezing tonight and gusty winds. Just when I was starting to get used to spring too...
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting 659. hurricanehunter27:
I'm currently at the NWS office in Norman OK. The facility is amazing. Cannot wait for my tour and eventual meeting with Dr. Carr. I'll make a post about my visit when I get back to my home in Atlanta.
thank them for giving us good updates on the severe storms.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 670. sar2401:

I tried voting for you again but I still get the same error. :-(

Don't worry about it. I think you can vote only once anyways.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Like the saying goes "Go big or go home". That should be the term of this years El-Nino.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 659. hurricanehunter27:
I'm currently at the NWS office in Norman OK. The facility is amazing. Cannot wait for my tour and eventual meeting with Dr. Carr. I'll make a post about my visit when I get back to my home in Atlanta.


I'm jealous
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The sub surface warm pool that we all have been tracking is now getting much larger. This is a really good indicator that this years El-Nino will be a big one. People from California to Texas are really hoping this pans out as Texas is still in the a midst of a major drought which really has never been able to shake since 2011.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ameister12:
Good afternoon everybody!

Overnight, I went from zero to 14 votes in Force-13's contest and I'm now in the lead! That's really awesome! I really, really appreciate all the votes, guys! It means a lot. :D

I tried voting for you again but I still get the same error. :-(
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting 617. FunnelVortex:


That's one heck of a westerly wind burst.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good afternoon everybody!

Overnight, I went from zero to 14 votes in Force-13's contest and I'm now in the lead! That's really awesome! I really, really appreciate all the votes, guys! It means a lot. :D
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 617. FunnelVortex:


The Westerly Wind Burst continues. Good sign for El Nino.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I'm currently at the NWS office in Norman OK. The facility is amazing. Cannot wait for my tour and eventual meeting with Dr. Carr. I'll make a post about my visit when I get back to my home in Atlanta.

Cool! Take lots of pictures.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting sar2401:

Thank you, Dr. Masters. I can certainly understand why having two independent measures is a good thing. I also have no quarrel with the fact these measurements are real. However, I still didn't see the answers I was looking for. How much does it cost, on an annual basis, to run the Mauna Loa site, what is their current funding, and how much of a shortfall is projected. I will be more than willing to make a donation once I know those answers.


EDIT: I didn't see in your post that these donations are meant to keep 12 sites going. Is this the case?
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting JeffMasters:


Good question, and I got this response to your question from Ralph Keeling:

"A key point is that the Scripps CO2 and O2 programs are making a much larger suite of measurements than just CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa. Flasks are also being collected at roughly a dozen stations around the world which are analyzed for CO2 concentration, CO2 isotopes, and O2 concentrations. The full suite is very helpful to understanding how and why carbon dioxide is changing and how the planet is responding to climate changes. My challenge is to sustain all this.

Turning to Mauna Loa, you are correct that measurements of CO2 concentration are being made there not just by the Scripps instrument, but also by an instrument maintained by NOAA. But it is actually quite important to keep both going. When you are measuring changes over time, you obviously only get one chance to make the measurements. We can't go back and repeat the measurements for Feb 2014, for example. That's now past. So the only way to ensure a reliable record in the face of inevitable glitches is to build in sufficient redundancy. Considering the importance of the Mauna Loa record and the level of scrutiny it receives, having two independent instruments with independent calibration is critical. Last year was the first time we recorded daily values going over 400 ppm. This 400 ppm event, which garnered a lot of media attention, was demonstrably real because both programs recorded very similar excursions. The same issue of reliability applies for the long-term record. The similarity of the records over time is critical to establish credibility of the trends.

There are other reasons specifically for keeping Scripps involved. The measurements we make tie directly back to the original measurements made by my father in the 1950s, whereas the NOAA measurements started more recently. In subtle ways, the records can be different, and for detecting certain aspects of long-term change, a consistent record over the full period can be important. Finally, it can be important to have an organization that is independent of the federal government involved in the measurements."


Ralph Keeling
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
University of California, San Diego

Thank you, Dr. Masters. I can certainly understand why having two independent measures is a good thing. I also have no quarrel with the fact these measurements are real. However, I still didn't see the answers I was looking for. How much does it cost, on an annual basis, to run the Mauna Loa site, what is their current funding, and how much of a shortfall is projected. I will be more than willing to make a donation once I know those answers.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
We Thank Ralph Keeling for such a timely and well explained reply.

It is a very important sustained measurement.





Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128269
Quoting FunnelVortex:


No wreckage has been found because they are probably not searching hard enough.

Or in the wrong area. I can't understand why there hasn't been a completed computer analysis of the radar track by now. In my experience, it never took longer than two days for this. Of course, those analysis were conducted by the FAA and, in some cases, the DOD. I have no idea on how Malaysia is handling this. Except for search efforts, I haven't seen any evidence they are asking for international help.

An issue which is like the elephant behind the curtain is that Malaysia is a Muslim country. 65% of the population is Muslim, and the state religion is Muslim. I hope this isn't playing a part in asking for help from Western countries,but I suspect it is, along with the usual issues of national pride.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
You can help search now.

Malaysia Airlines Missing Plane: Can Crowdsourcing Help Locate Flight MH370? DigitalGlobe Hopes So

By Christopher Zara

on March 11 2014 3:24 PM


Share this article
280
35
0
more
Malaysia Air MH370 Screen
A woman stands in front of a giant screen showing the number of hours since Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 went missing, Beijing, March 10, 2014. Reuters/Jason Lee


Update 6:50 p.m. EST: The overwhelming response to DigitalGlobe's call has crashed the site, Fox reports.

“It’s a good reason to have our site crash,” a spokesperson told FoxNews.com. “We did get an overwhelming amount of people responding. It has been going well. We are getting a lot of tags and will be uploading more images for people to search.”

“Luckily, the imagery had been exhausted with searching before the site went down,” said Luke Barrington, the company's senior manager of Geospatial Big Data. “We have had 6 million map views. Half-a-million people have signed up, it’s a 100 times the response we’ve had before.”

Related


Flight MH370 Disappearance Reveals Flaws In Plane Radar Tracking
What Happens When Your Passport Is Stolen Abroad?
Original story:

As the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 continues, one company is enlisting help from an unlikely investigator: you.

DigitalGlobe Inc. (NYSE:DGI) on Monday announced a crowdsourcing platform that will allow anyone to help look for the missing Boeing 777 by combing through satellite images for clues of its whereabouts. The Longmont, Colo., company said two of its commercial satellites have already collected images comprising roughly 1,988 square miles at the confluence of the Gulf of Thailand and the South China Sea, where the Beijing-bound aircraft mysteriously went missing on Saturday. The company is continuing to update the images to reflect new information about the search area provided by the Malaysian government.

Internet users can help in the search by visiting Tomnod.com, DigitalGlobe’s crowdsourcing arm, where volunteers can search through images and tag objects of interest. Users can tag objects using special icons that indicate possible rafts, oil slicks or pieces of airplane wreckage. The campaign has been deployed via DigitalGlobe’s emergency management service, FirstLook, and already has attracted a huge amount of interest. The service was down periodically on Tuesday as DigitalGlobe worked to handle what it called “an unprecedented level of Web traffic and interest in supporting the search.” On Reddit, numerous threads dedicated to the missing plane have already incorporated links to DigitalGlobe’s campaign.

This isn’t the first time DigitalGlobe has sought the wisdom of the crowd to assist with a tragedy. The company deployed a similar campaign in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines in November. That effort -- like the campaign to locate flight 370 -- also used Tomnod to let volunteers scan images and tag objects. According to DigitalGlobe, more than 60,000 objects were tagged in the campaign’s first 24 hours alone.

As of Tuesday afternoon, authorities were still investigating several theories about what happened to the plane, which vanished from radar screens over Southeast Asia about 50 minutes after it departed from the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur.

The aircraft was carrying 239 people, including 227 passengers and 12 crew. At least two of the passengers are said to have boarded the plane with stolen passports, but it remains unclear if they are connected to the plane’s disappearance.

According to an update Tuesday, DigitalGlobe has new image collections relevant to the search and plans to make them available online as soon as possible. Interested users can visit Tomnod for more information.

Got a news tip? Email me. Follow me on Twitter @christopherzara.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128269
660. JeffMasters (Admin)
Quoting 52. sar2401:
What is the total cost of running the Scripps observatory on Mauna Loa? When I was last on top of Mauna Loa, I visited the NOAA observatory. It looked like they are monitoring Co2 concentrations there as well, since they had a graph posted that looked like the Keeling Curve. OK, I just looked up the NOAA site on Mauna Loa and they are monitoring Co2. How is this different from what Scripps is doing? Is there some reason we need two sites located a couple of hundred feet from each other doing the same thing?

NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory


Good question, and I got this response to your question from Ralph Keeling:

"A key point is that the Scripps CO2 and O2 programs are making a much larger suite of measurements than just CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa. Flasks are also being collected at roughly a dozen stations around the world which are analyzed for CO2 concentration, CO2 isotopes, and O2 concentrations. The full suite is very helpful to understanding how and why carbon dioxide is changing and how the planet is responding to climate changes. My challenge is to sustain all this.

Turning to Mauna Loa, you are correct that measurements of CO2 concentration are being made there not just by the Scripps instrument, but also by an instrument maintained by NOAA. But it is actually quite important to keep both going. When you are measuring changes over time, you obviously only get one chance to make the measurements. We can't go back and repeat the measurements for Feb 2014, for example. That's now past. So the only way to ensure a reliable record in the face of inevitable glitches is to build in sufficient redundancy. Considering the importance of the Mauna Loa record and the level of scrutiny it receives, having two independent instruments with independent calibration is critical. Last year was the first time we recorded daily values going over 400 ppm. This 400 ppm event, which garnered a lot of media attention, was demonstrably real because both programs recorded very similar excursions. The same issue of reliability applies for the long-term record. The similarity of the records over time is critical to establish credibility of the trends.

There are other reasons specifically for keeping Scripps involved. The measurements we make tie directly back to the original measurements made by my father in the 1950s, whereas the NOAA measurements started more recently. In subtle ways, the records can be different, and for detecting certain aspects of long-term change, a consistent record over the full period can be important. Finally, it can be important to have an organization that is independent of the federal government involved in the measurements."


Ralph Keeling
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
University of California, San Diego
I'm currently at the NWS office in Norman OK. The facility is amazing. Cannot wait for my tour and eventual meeting with Dr. Carr. I'll make a post about my visit when I get back to my home in Atlanta.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:
Could have been a known failure mode for that airplane model:

Malaysia Airlines has confirmed it received a warning from the Federal Aviation Administration in November, urging airlines to look out for corrosion under the skin of the fuselage of Boeing 777s.


Link

The FAA had issued a draft of the Airworthiness directive in September, and all airlines would have been required to comply with inspections then. A draft is a requirement, even though the AD wasn't issued until March 5. Only Malaysian Airlines can tell us if they completed the inspection. There are hundreds of 777's in the air and this is the only one that's disappeared. Still, what's troubling is the area subject to corrosion is in the area of the satcomm antenna. If a rupture took place there, that would explain why no ACARS messages were sent, since they would have been transmitted by satellite at that point in the flight.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109
Quoting FunnelVortex:


We don't know what the motives were.

A plane way off course like that smells like a hijack to me.

We don't know that the plane was off course. The head of the Malaysian Air Force is now denying that he ever said his radars tracked it off course. There are so many leaked and anonymous statements, distortions, and rumors floating about I have no idea what's true now, except my own experience in missing aircraft searches.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15109

Viewing: 707 - 657

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy
77 °F
Partly Cloudy