Save the Keeling Curve!

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:13 PM GMT on March 11, 2014

Share this Blog
64
+

Climate change's most iconic research project is in danger--a victim of budget cuts in an era of increased government belt-tightening. The Keeling Curve is a measurement of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere made atop Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, begun in 1958 by Dr. Charles Keeling. It is the longest-running such measurement in the world. The curve was instrumental in showing how human emissions of carbon dioxide were steadily accumulating in Earth's atmosphere, and raised awareness that human-caused climate change was an ever-increasing threat to the stability of our climate. After Keeling's death in 2005, the measurements were continued by his son, Ralph F. Keeling. Support from NSF, NOAA and NASA is being diminished or withdrawn, and Keeling has turned to crowd-funding to help raise funds to continue these important measurements. I hope you can join me in making a donation.


Figure 1. The Keeling Curve: climate change's most iconic image. The curve's steady year-by-year increase in CO2 due to burning of coal, oil, and natural gas has wriggles on top of it, due to the natural seasonal cycle in CO2--plants suck in CO2 during the Northern Hemisphere growing season, then release it during the winter. Image credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USCD.


Figure 2. Dr. Charles Keeling posing at the entrance to the Charles Keeling Building at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

CO2 Levels Hit 401 ppm
The latest data from the Keeling curve website shows that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are surging upwards in their usual late winter push, as plants return CO2 to the atmosphere before the Northern Hemisphere spring growing season hits. CO2 levels reached 401 ppm (parts per million) last week on top of Mauna Loa, setting a new record. CO2 levels were at 280 ppm in 1870, increased less than 1 ppm per year in the 1960s, then accelerated to 2 ppm per year during the 2000s. Less than 1% of the increase since 1870 has been due to natural sources, such as volcanoes. The last time carbon dioxide levels reached 400 ppm—between 2.5 and 5 million years ago during the Pliocene Era—the Earth was 3.5 to 9° F warmer (2 to 5° C), and sea levels were 65 to 80 feet higher.

Links
There is a hashtag #savetheKeelingCurve
Eli Rabett's post, Shaking the Cup for Science
What Does 400 ppm Look Like? December 2013 blog post by Robert Monroe of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.




Senate holds all-nighter on climate change
A group of 31 U.S. Senators pulled an all-nighter last night on the floor of the U.S. Senate, taking turns from 9 pm Monday night until 9 am Tuesday morning to promote policy actions on climate change. Many of the Senators involved issued tweets using the hashtag #Up4Climate. The all-nighter was another indication that politicians are becoming increasingly bold about speaking up on climate change.

Latest Version of our WunderMap App Now Includes WunderPhotos
Weather Underground has released today a new version of our WunderMap app for iPhone and iPad. The main new feature that we'd like to highlight is the WunderPhotos layer--now users can view, share, and submit photos all from within the app. Here are a few of the features of the new version of the WunderMap app:

◦ Improved Weather Station display, and both station size and station spacing are now adjustable (Weather Stations Layer ⇒ Settings).
◦ New WunderPhotos layer! View, share, and submit beautiful weather photos.
◦ Fixed incorrect elevation for some Personal Weather Stations.
◦ Swipe-to-delete search history items.
◦ "Terrain/Satellite” and other map options made more prominent.
◦ Bug fixes (crashes, visual glitches, and usability enhancements).
◦ Optimized performance across all devices.


The latest version is available to download for iPhone and iPad at https://itunes.apple.com/app/wundermap/id364884105?mt=8.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 757 - 707

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21Blog Index

The map shows a lot of people in the northern highlands of Vietnam. Besides a huge passenger jet crashing would be heard for miles.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTrackerScott:
Something of interest on this map is the bright green anomalies over FL and across the SW Atlantic. This may be the year of many home grown systems.


Am I reading that right? It looks like most of the area has negative anomalies.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Wind chill warning in effect for:
•City of Toronto

Cold wind chill values expected overnight into Thursday morning.

Very cold north to northwest winds in the wake of the snow storm will draw in unseasonably cold air overnight. As temperatures bottom out near minus 20 or colder in many areas, winds of 20 to 30 km/h will produce wind chill values near minus 30 except minus 35 just east of Georgian Bay.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


WIND CHILL WARNING IN EFFECT

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT IN EFFECT

Toronto Pearson Int'l Airport
Date: 4:30 PM EDT Wednesday 12 March 2014
Condition:Light Snow
Pressure:29.6 inches
Tendency:falling
Visibility:0.4 miles
Temperature:15.4°F
Dewpoint:10.9°F
Humidity:82%
Wind:N 27 gust 36 mph
Wind Chill: -4
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting DonnieBwkGA:
Vietnam has 90 million people and is densely populated. I think a large jet crashing would be noticed since even the more rural areas are not uninhabited. Here is a population density map from 1999. Vietnam's population has gone up almost 20 million since then.


The northern highlands are sparsely populated and heavily vegetated. It's entirely possible for an aircraft to crash in such a region and not be noticed. There are still multiple unlocated wrecks of military aircraft that wen down in the region during the Vietnam War.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
They are just not getting a break up there.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Laos is much less densely populated but I don't think the jet made it that far.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Something of interest on this map is the bright green anomalies over FL and across the SW Atlantic. This may be the year of many home grown systems.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Grothar:
I don't ever speculate on tragedies, because it can lead to confusion and a lot of misinformation. But this tragedy does have me a little baffled. Has anyone ever asked the question if anyone has tried to contact any of the passengers cell phones? Just a thought, as I would hope for the best rather than the worse case scenario.

There have been stories of just that, and I imagine that relatives have been attempting this long before officials thought of it. To my knowledge, and this is only what I read, there has been no success. If, by some bizarre turn of events, the plane and passengers are safely on the ground somewhere, there may simply be no cell service or the cell phones were confiscated. I think we both know what the more likely probability is. :-(
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Vietnam has 90 million people and is densely populated. I think a large jet crashing would be noticed since even the more rural areas are not uninhabited. Here is a population density map from 2000. Vietnam's population has gone up more than 15 million since then.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Satellites join search for missing plane
International space agencies join "unprecedented" search for Malaysian airliner which disappeared on Saturday.


Last updated: 12 Mar 2014 16:04

Satellites have joined the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, joining 42 ships and 39 aircraft deployed in an "unprecedented" search for the missing airliner.

The move came after China requested activation of the so-called International Charter on Space and Major Disasters, an agreement under which 15 space agencies or institutes can help emergency or relief efforts by passing on satellite images, according to a report from AFP.

"Satellite imagery is now being employed to search for any evidence of the plane, both before and after it disappeared," the charter's website said.

Flight MH370 took off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing early on Saturday morning and last made contact with ground control officials about 35,000 feet (10,600km) above the Gulf of Thailand, between Malaysia and southern Vietnam before vanishing.

Hishammuddin Hussein, Malaysia's transport minister, on Wednesday said the sea and air search for the missing plane had been expanded to two areas and now covered almost 50,000 square kilometres.

Hussein described the search effort for the missing plane with 239 people on board as "unprecedented" and said authorities would continue searching until they found it. The operation is a multinational effort with 12 countries now taking part.

Hussein gave his assurance to the families of passengers and crew that no efforts would be spared in finding the plane.


"We will never give up hope," he said.

Rodzali Daud, the head of the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF), said radar detected what could have been the jetliner in an area in the northern Malacca Strait, hundreds of kilometres from the spot where the plane dropped off air traffic screens.

Daud told the joint news conference that an aircraft was tracked at 2:15am local time on Saturday, about 45 minutes after the plane with 239 people on board vanished from air traffic control screens midway between Malaysia's east coast and Vietnam.

He said the aircraft was at a point 320km northwest of Penang island on Malaysia's west coast.

Flight path confusion

Earlier, there were reports that he had denied saying the airliner had turned back towards Kuala Lumpur, flying hundreds of kilometres to the west.

Malaysia's Berita Harian newspaper had quoted General Tan Sri Rodzali Daud as saying military radar detected the plane near the island of Pulau Perak, at the northern end of the Strait of Malacca, flying about 1,000 metres lower than its previous altitude.

However, Daud said the RMAF had not ruled out the possibility the aircraft had turned back before vanishing from the radar.

On Monday, Malaysian authorities doubled the search radius to 185km around the point where Malaysia Airlines MH370 disappeared from radar over the South China Sea.

"The biggest problem is just knowing where to look, especially at night," Vo Van Tuan, a top Vietnamese military officer who is leading Vietnam's search effort, told the AFP news agency.

The total search sphere now includes land on the Malaysian peninsula itself, the waters off its west coast, and an area to the north of the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Police had earlier said they were investigating whether any passengers or crew on the plane had personal or psychological problems that might explain its disappearance, along with the possibility of a hijack.

On Tuesday, Interpol said the disappearance of the plane was not likely to have been caused by a "terrorist" attack.

"The more information we get, the more we are inclined to conclude it was not a terrorist incident," Ronald Noble, head of Interpol said.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
C&P

In August 1947 a British Avro Lancastrian airliner, named Star Dust crashed into a mountain in the Argentine Andes during a routine flight from Buenos Aires to Santiago in Chile. Searches for the aircraft came up blank and conspiracy theories soon emerged that pointed the finger at saboteurs and - after confusion over the final coded transmission to Santiago airport - even aliens. The speculation was eventually put to rest 50 years later when mountaineers stumbled across the remnants of the plane's wreckage and experts concluded that the crew had been confused by poor weather and accidentally started their descent too soon.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 741. ncstorm:
'Phantom call' theory dismissed by experts
By Euan McKirdy, CNN
updated 8:19 AM EDT, Wed March 12, 2014


CNN) -- The mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 appeared to deepen as reports emerged that passengers' cell phones continued to ring long after the flight went missing Saturday.

After the torment of not knowing what has happened to their loved ones, relatives of MH370 passengers had resorted to calling their phones, and were greeted with ringtones.

The aircraft disappeared unexpectedly from tracking early Saturday. No distress call from the pilots was received, and search efforts to date have not yielded any conclusive results, only adding to the uncertainty surrounding the fate of the Beijing-bound flight.

Speculation quickly mounted on social media that these "phantom calls" amounted to evidence that the flight had not crashed, as has been widely assumed.
Conspiracy theories surround Flight 370
Aerial view of search is 'reality check'

"Frustrated! ... There are reports from family members that phone calls to their missing loved ones have 'rung through,' indicating the phones aren't on the bottom of the ocean," one Facebook user surmised.


Thanks for the response, nc. Just hoping for the best.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yonzabam:


It took a year to find the wreckage of Steve Fossett's plane, and that was just 65 miles from where it took off.

Good point. I am very familiar with that search. There was more effort in time and money spent on that search than for any previous non-commercial flight. There were over 30 official aircraft and at least a dozen "volunteer" aircraft flying the search, with about 300 searchers on the ground. It was one of the first crowdsourced satellite photo searches. The results of that were about 150 false clues and nothing useful. The crash site was finally located because a hiker found his ID scattered around a trail. Once that last known point was established, it only took two days to locate the crash site by air. None of the official or volunteer efforts produced one useful result.

The worst possible scenario was that aircraft continued on autopilot and went down somewhere on land over Vietnam. If that's the case, it will be a very long time until the crash site is discovered.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Confusion clouds search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

By Jethro Mullen and Michael Pearson, CNN

updated 3:20 PM EDT, Wed March 12, 2014

Forty-two ships and 39 planes from 12 countries have been searching the sea between the northeast coast of Malaysia and southwest Vietnam, the area where the plane lost contact with air traffic controllers.
But they are also looking off the west coast of the Malay Peninsula, in the Straits of Malacca, and north into the Andaman Sea.

So far, searchers have found no trace of the plane.
What happened leading to the plane's disappearance also remains a mystery. Leading theories include hijacking, an explosion or a catastrophic mechanical failure.
Suggestions that the plane had veered off course and that its identifying transponder was not working raise obvious concerns about a hijacking, analysts tell CNN. But a catastrophic power failure or other problem could also explain the anomalies, analysts say.

In a sign authorities are looking at all options, Kuala Lumpur police told CNN they are searching the home of the airliner's Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
'Phantom call' theory dismissed by experts
By Euan McKirdy, CNN
updated 8:19 AM EDT, Wed March 12, 2014


CNN) -- The mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 appeared to deepen as reports emerged that passengers' cell phones continued to ring long after the flight went missing Saturday.

After the torment of not knowing what has happened to their loved ones, relatives of MH370 passengers had resorted to calling their phones, and were greeted with ringtones.

The aircraft disappeared unexpectedly from tracking early Saturday. No distress call from the pilots was received, and search efforts to date have not yielded any conclusive results, only adding to the uncertainty surrounding the fate of the Beijing-bound flight.

Speculation quickly mounted on social media that these "phantom calls" amounted to evidence that the flight had not crashed, as has been widely assumed.
Conspiracy theories surround Flight 370
Aerial view of search is 'reality check'

"Frustrated! ... There are reports from family members that phone calls to their missing loved ones have 'rung through,' indicating the phones aren't on the bottom of the ocean," one Facebook user surmised.
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14602
A windy warm day. 59/78. Partly cloudy. Had 0.16" of rain early this morning with thunder from the south but no thunderstorm over me. We may get to 80 later this afternoon. Near 40 tonight. Front should be here around 9/10 p.m.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Impressive.



Euro isn't messing around.



Look at the Caribbean.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 735. Grothar:
I don't ever speculate on tragedies, because it can lead to confusion and a lot of misinformation. But this tragedy does have me a little baffled. Has anyone ever asked the question if anyone has tried to contact any of the passengers cell phones? Just a thought, as I would hope for the best rather than the worse case scenario.


There's been a lot of comments on this on the Guardian and Telegraph comments sections. Apparently, relatives say the phones are responding, but other comments lose me in the technicalities.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
here the winter storm
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 735. Grothar:
I don't ever speculate on tragedies, because it can lead to confusion and a lot of misinformation. But this tragedy does have me a little baffled. Has anyone ever asked the question if anyone has tried to contact any of the passengers cell phones? Just a thought, as I would hope for the best rather than the worse case scenario.

I saw on the news where one of the family members tried to call their relative on the plane--nobody answered. That's kind of sombering.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31537
I don't ever speculate on tragedies, because it can lead to confusion and a lot of misinformation. But this tragedy does have me a little baffled. Has anyone ever asked the question if anyone has tried to contact any of the passengers cell phones? Just a thought, as I would hope for the best rather than the worse case scenario.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 673. StormTrackerScott:
Like the saying goes "Go big or go home". That should be the term of this years El-Nino.


I tend to agree, and the latest PDO reports also would favor an oncoming El Nino. It seems like after a four year hiatus, an El Nino event is finally developing. Now all we have to wait for is for the SST anomalies across the equatorial Pacific to respond in kind. It'll be interesting to see how this El Nino has an impact on the hurricane season. We'll probably have higher trade winds across the Caribbean early on, so that'll limit activity across the eastern and western Caribbean. The SST anomalies across the eastern Atlantic are already below average, so we shouldn't expect a huge Cape Verde season. However, I believe that it won't be nearly as anemic as what 2013 saw, although no real strong evidence has emerged to suggest either way that I know of. We should have a clearer picture by June 1st on what this season may look like.

We're starting to get towards the time though where this stuff starts to matter for the upcoming season, so it's important to start paying attention to these signs.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLwolverine:
The tone that comes through to me in the article is that he's embarrassed by this crowd funding "stunt" - but that's just my interpretation. It must be incredibly stressful to see your life's work and your father's legacy - work that is recognized internationally as being important - so threatened by lack of funds.

As to why the donation site wants your address and email, one reason is because donations are by credit card (so they need the confirming info) and another is they want to put you on their donor contact list. They should offer the option of letting you donate anonymously (ie, not be listed on some website acknowledging donors) even if they do collect your address for credit card purposes.

And I do agree that it would be easier if they set up Paypal. Scripps just probably figured that they have a lot of experience in fund raising and collecting so they could do it the way they always do.

I can certainly see your interpretation as one explanation. Still, we sometimes have to swallow our pride to keep something important going.

It's not clear to me why they need all my address information and name, plus my employer and job title, just to give them 20 bucks. This smells to me of building contact lists for future donations. I see no disclaimer at the page about my information would be used except a general statement about the UCSD website.

At any rate, a Paypal link and I can donate in a minute. It just seems like a reasonable thing for crowdsourcing.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
An active subtropical jet keeps winters in the South United States cool and wet/snowy. If you want snow, wish for an El Nino. Meanwhile, the West and North are generally warmer-than-average (but not significantly so).



As a whole, the Earth runs a fever. If we get an El Nino, there's a high chance 2014 goes down as the warmest on record.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31537
I AM getting rain from Winter Storm Vulcan in new haven,conn
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yonzabam:


They could theoretically fly to Somalia. I read that fuel is cheaper in Malaysia than China, so they would probably have been carrying more than they needed to get to Beijing, and that a full tank could take them 10,000 miles.

You're thinking of a 777-200LR. This is the ER model, and maximum range is more like 8,000 miles. I don't know what the fuel load was for this 777-200ER, but Kuala Lumpur to Beijing is a relatively short haul (~2700 miles). With normal reserves, the aircraft was probably not carrying more than a 75% load, since it was scheduled to return to Kuala Lumpur. Airlines don't carry full fuel loads unless they are on a long haul flight. Range with 75% load would be about 6100 miles at economic cruise, and the aircraft had already used about 10% of the fuel taking off and climbing. The realistic range would have been more on the order of 5000 miles. I really don't think all this matters, since I think the aircraft crashed somewhere near the planned flight route. If it entered the water mostly intact, there won't be much surface debris, so finding it is way more difficult than it might seem.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Quoting 717. Waltanater:
Yeah, everything about this is so mysterious and interesting at the same time....nothing makes sense...yet.


It took a year to find the wreckage of Steve Fossett's plane, and that was just 65 miles from where it took off.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 721. sar2401:

I saw your post previously. I'm more than a little puzzled that Dr. Kneeling couldn't have made a straightforward statement of his budget woes to Dr. Masters, since he apparently has already done so for public consumption.
The tone that comes through to me in the article is that he's embarrassed by this crowd funding "stunt" - but that's just my interpretation. It must be incredibly stressful to see your life's work and your father's legacy - work that is recognized internationally as being important - so threatened by lack of funds.

As to why the donation site wants your address and email, one reason is because donations are by credit card (so they need the confirming info) and another is they want to put you on their donor contact list. They should offer the option of letting you donate anonymously (ie, not be listed on some website acknowledging donors) even if they do collect your address for credit card purposes.

And I do agree that it would be easier if they set up Paypal. Scripps just probably figured that they have a lot of experience in fund raising and collecting so they could do it the way they always do.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Portlight Conference, New Jersey




What: The Getting It Right Conference - Shelter and Transportation Accessibility for People with Disabilities during relief and evacuation efforts

When: June 26-27, 2014

Where: Sheraton Lincoln Harbor, Weehawken, NJ



Who: Portlight Strategies, Inc. and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation



Why: Shelter and transportation accessibility are of paramount importance to people with disabilities in disaster situations. All too often in recent events these considerations have gone unaddressed...putting the lives of people with disabilities in grave danger. For shelter operators, addressing the needs of people living with disabilities can be a complex and confusing issue. We understand this...and are facilitating the Getting It Right conference to show that shelter and accessibility considerations are not only the right thing to do...they can be done easily...and usually inexpensively.

Our goal is to help shelter operators and transportation coordinators understand that a few simple steps can effectively address most concerns.. We understand these are unique...and short term...situations....and we want to stress: The perfect cannot become the enemy of the functional and adequate. In other words...we want to give the situation another look and help you while you are helping others.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
Quoting 725. NCstu:
I was just about to post that. Perhaps charlotte will get a t-storm.


yeah..looks like we here in wilmington are about to get some from my nowcast forecast..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14602
725. NCstu
Quoting 723. ncstorm:
the SPC has updated their map twice this afternoon..

I was just about to post that. Perhaps charlotte will get a t-storm.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
SPC AC 121950

DAY 1 CONVECTIVE OUTLOOK
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
0250 PM CDT WED MAR 12 2014

VALID 122000Z - 131200Z

...THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS ACROSS PORTIONS OF THE MID
ATLANTIC...

MOSAIC RADAR IMAGERY INDICATES A STRONGLY FORCED...BROKEN CONVECTIVE
BAND CROSSING THE CNTRL APPALACHIANS ALONG/JUST AHEAD OF A STRONG
COLD FRONT. AFTER THIS ACTIVITY CROSSES THE BLUE RIDGE AND EMERGES
OVER THE PIEDMONT...IT SHOULD HAVE A TENDENCY OF INTENSIFYING WHILE
ENCOUNTERING A NARROW CORRIDOR OF VERY MARGINAL INSTABILITY WITHIN
THE WARM SECTOR OF A STRENGTHENING CYCLONE WHOSE CENTER IS ANALYZED
OVER CNTRL PA. THE 18Z SOUNDING FROM WASHINGTON/DULLES SAMPLES
MODESTLY STEEP SFC-1-KM LAPSE RATES WHICH WILL SUPPORT POCKETS OF
AROUND 100-200 J/KG OF SBCAPE AHEAD OF THE CONVECTION. WITH
WARM-SECTOR VWP/S SAMPLING AOA 40-50 KT OF FLOW EXTENDING AS LOW AS
1 KM AGL INTO NRN NC...AND GIVEN FURTHER INTENSIFICATION OF A LLJ
AND A STRONG CROSS-FRONTAL PRESSURE RISE-FALL COUPLET...DAMAGING
WINDS WILL REMAIN A POSSIBILITY DESPITE THE PAUCITY OF BUOYANCY
SUPPORTING ONLY...AT MOST...SPORADIC LIGHTNING STRIKES. THIS
POTENTIAL IS EXPECTED TO EXTEND TO THE COAST...WARRANTING EWD
EXTENSION OF THE SLIGHT-RISK AREA TO THE COAST. FURTHERMORE...WITH
2-HR SFC PRESSURE FALLS OF 4-6 MB PRECEDING THE SFC LOW FROM CNTRL
PA TO SRN NY...THE STRONG ISALLOBARIC FLOW RESPONSE SHOULD DRIVE THE
NARROW CORRIDOR OF VERY MARGINAL INSTABILITY NWD INTO MORE OF ERN PA
AND NJ -- EVEN IN AREAS WHERE CLOUDS ARE CURRENTLY THICKER AND
STUNTING DIABATIC SFC HEATING -- WARRANTING NWD EXPANSION OF THE
SLIGHT-RISK AREA. OTHERWISE...THE WRN BOUNDS OF THE SLIGHT-RISK AND
GENERAL-THUNDERSTORM AREAS HAVE BEEN SHIFTED EWD TO ACCOUNT FOR THE
ONGOING POSITION OF THE AFOREMENTIONED CONVECTION.
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14602
the SPC has updated their map twice this afternoon..

Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14602
Quoting Waltanater:
To steal a plane.

Why? What are "they" going to do with it? Where are the passengers and crew? Why would the Maldives, a peaceful, very small country, that relies on tourism for survival, want to be a part of such a plan? Anything is possible, but the probability of such an event seems infinitesimally small.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Quoting FLwolverine:
The article I referenced here yesterday from Nature says this:

Keeling says that he received around US$700,000 annually for the CO2 programme through paired support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE) until three years ago, when the NSF halted funding. With staff cuts, he has been able to maintain operations with a budget of around $350,000. He has also partnered with Earth Networks, an atmospheric-monitoring company based in Germantown, Maryland, which has deployed a sensor for him at Mauna Loa to reduce the costs for Scripps. His latest grant application to the DOE is pending, but in the meantime he is operating on spare funds.

The situation is murkier for the oxygen measurements, which the NSF and NOAA supported for more than two decades. The NSF pulled the plug in 2009, and Keeling’s NOAA grant could run out in early January. In an effort to keep things going, Keeling says that he went back to the NSF and was assured that he would get about $350,000 from the Division of Polar Programs this autumn. (NSF officials say that they cannot comment on pending grants.) That money would carry him into next year, but it remains unclear what will happen after that. Jim Butler, director of NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division in Boulder, says that NOAA cannot simply fold Keeling’s CO2 stations into its own observations budget, given that the value of having two CO2 networks is scientific independence. The oxygen measurements, by contrast, would fit nicely into NOAA’s portfolio, Butler adds, but his division’s budget has shrunk by 12% since 2011, with further cuts expected this fiscal year. Budget constraints have already forced the agency to reduce staff and shut down monitoring at ten sites.

Link

I saw your post previously. I'm more than a little puzzled that Dr. Kneeling couldn't have made a straightforward statement of his budget woes to Dr. Masters, since he apparently has already done so for public consumption.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Quoting 718. sar2401:

There's one airport, Ibrahim Nasir International Airport, that's capable of landing a 777. It would be pretty hard to sneak in and not have anyone notice. I have a hard time understanding why a hijacked aircraft could be in someone's hands for four days and nothing has come out about it. The plane crashed somewhere within a hundred miles of the last point of contact. Unfortunately, the last point of contact seems to get murkier the more times Malaysian authorities open their mouths.
To steal a plane.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
719. etxwx
It's a lovely day here and we had a common snapping turtle slooooooowly walking across the front yard this afternoon. It stopped to enjoy the sunshine so there was plenty of time to take some pics. We netted it and relocated it to the creek way behind the house. It seemed okay with the whole plan and wasn't near as snappish as some we've relocated.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Waltanater:


Ummm...has anyone checked the Maldives Islands!? If you go DUE WEST from that last point of contact, they could theoretically fly right into the southern islands and land. There are 2 small airports there and I think they are under Islamic rule. With the remaining fuel, it would take them 5.3 hours to get there, assuming 330 mph all the way. They could have flown in dark! That is my theory.

There's one airport, Ibrahim Nasir International Airport, that's capable of landing a 777. It would be pretty hard to sneak in and not have anyone notice. I have a hard time understanding why a hijacked aircraft could be in someone's hands for four days and nothing has come out about it. The plane crashed somewhere within a hundred miles of the last point of contact. Unfortunately, the last point of contact seems to get murkier the more times Malaysian authorities open their mouths.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Quoting 716. yonzabam:


They could theoretically fly to Somalia. I read that fuel is cheaper in Malaysia than China, so they would probably have been carrying more than they needed to get to Beijing, and that a full tank could take them 10,000 miles.
Yeah, everything about this is so mysterious and interesting at the same time....nothing makes sense...yet.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 706. Waltanater:


Ummm...has anyone checked the Maldives Islands!? If you go DUE WEST from that last point of contact, they could theoretically fly right into the southern islands and land. There are 2 small airports there and I think they are under Islamic rule. With the remaining fuel, it would take them 5.3 hours to get there, assuming 330 mph all the way. They could have flown in dark! That is my theory.


They could theoretically fly to Somalia. I read that fuel is cheaper in Malaysia than China, so they would probably have been carrying more than they needed to get to Beijing, and that a full tank could take them 10,000 miles.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Nearby Airports march 12 2014 at 3:35pm

New Haven | Overcast | 51 °F
Chester | Light Drizzle | 52 °F
Meriden | Overcast | 47 °F




Nearby Weather Stations

Bishops Orchards-Meadow Ridge | 51.4 °F
Orcutt | 51.4 °F
Bishops Orchards-LHR | 51.1 °F
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 703. JeffMasters:


Yes, the Scripps CO2 measurement program is done at 12 sites, not just Mauna Loa, and there is no way to target a donation just to maintaining the Mauna Loa site. Since I asked Dr. Keeling about the funding, and he did not respond, I assume that he is not comfortable sharing the details. I agree that it would be nice to know those numbers before making a donation; this was one nice feature of last year's DarkSnow crowd-funded Greenland research project.

Dr. M.
The article I referenced here yesterday from Nature says this:

Keeling says that he received around US$700,000 annually for the CO2 programme through paired support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE) until three years ago, when the NSF halted funding. With staff cuts, he has been able to maintain operations with a budget of around $350,000. He has also partnered with Earth Networks, an atmospheric-monitoring company based in Germantown, Maryland, which has deployed a sensor for him at Mauna Loa to reduce the costs for Scripps. His latest grant application to the DOE is pending, but in the meantime he is operating on spare funds.

The situation is murkier for the oxygen measurements, which the NSF and NOAA supported for more than two decades. The NSF pulled the plug in 2009, and Keeling’s NOAA grant could run out in early January. In an effort to keep things going, Keeling says that he went back to the NSF and was assured that he would get about $350,000 from the Division of Polar Programs this autumn. (NSF officials say that they cannot comment on pending grants.) That money would carry him into next year, but it remains unclear what will happen after that. Jim Butler, director of NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division in Boulder, says that NOAA cannot simply fold Keeling’s CO2 stations into its own observations budget, given that the value of having two CO2 networks is scientific independence. The oxygen measurements, by contrast, would fit nicely into NOAA’s portfolio, Butler adds, but his division’s budget has shrunk by 12% since 2011, with further cuts expected this fiscal year. Budget constraints have already forced the agency to reduce staff and shut down monitoring at ten sites.

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I see it now...but I didn't fill any of it out and it still went through
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 672 Comments: 21435
Quoting 710. sar2401:

Thanks again. I don't know why Dr. Kneeling wouldn't be comfortable sharing the details, since his work is part of a public institution and, I imagine, the details are available if I knew the right place to look. The Scripps annual reports are pretty sparse when it comes to budget details for individual programs. I'm also a little (well, more than a little) uncomfortable the UCSD demands my personal information, including my name, address, email address, and employer information just to make a donation. I'm also not going to share my bank information to make a donation. Why not just use Paypal, like other crowdsourcing donations I've made? UCSD has a huge department that processes gifts. It's hard to believe no one has bought these things up before. I've sent them an email asking why I can't make an anonymous donation and asking for more information on exactly what a donation to this fund is used for.


Employer info is optional, by the way. As for the other stuff, it never really occurred to me why anyone would want to keep all that private (I work for a public institution, all my information is available anyways), but to each his own, although I'm sure since it is through UCSD that it may be public record.
Member Since: June 1, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 3295
ncomfortable the UCSD demands my personal information, including my name, address, email address, and employer information just to make a donation.


they asked me my employer info?.....
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 672 Comments: 21435
Quoting JeffMasters:


Yes, the Scripps CO2 measurement program is done at 12 sites, not just Mauna Loa, and there is no way to target a donation just to maintaining the Mauna Loa site. Since I asked Dr. Keeling about the funding, and he did not respond, I assume that he is not comfortable sharing the details. I agree that it would be nice to know those numbers before making a donation; this was one nice feature of last year's DarkSnow crowd-funded Greenland research project.

Dr. M.

Thanks again. I don't know why Dr. Kneeling wouldn't be comfortable sharing the details, since his work is part of a public institution and, I imagine, the details are available if I knew the right place to look. The Scripps annual reports are pretty sparse when it comes to budget details for individual programs. I'm also a little (well, more than a little) uncomfortable the UCSD demands my personal information, including my name, address, email address, and employer information just to make a donation. I'm also not going to share my bank information to make a donation. Why not just use Paypal, like other crowdsourcing donations I've made? UCSD has a huge department that processes gifts. It's hard to believe no one has bought these things up before. I've sent them an email asking why I can't make an anonymous donation and asking for more information on exactly what a donation to this fund is used for.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13325
Even with above average rainfall in FL recently there are still signs from the 2010 drought here in FL especially in the Deltona area of SW Volusia County where water levels are very low in that area as well as in Winter Garden in western Orange County.


our closest lake...elephant butte...is only at 18 percent of capacity....do I want el nino......bring on 6.4 oz baby jesus!!!!
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 672 Comments: 21435


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
Cold, gray and windy after 3 days of warm, sunny spring conditions... :(
A good time to whip up some 'kitchen sink' soup! (can you guess how many ingredients are in this???)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 757 - 707

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.