Save the Keeling Curve!

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:13 PM GMT on March 11, 2014

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Climate change's most iconic research project is in danger--a victim of budget cuts in an era of increased government belt-tightening. The Keeling Curve is a measurement of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere made atop Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, begun in 1958 by Dr. Charles Keeling. It is the longest-running such measurement in the world. The curve was instrumental in showing how human emissions of carbon dioxide were steadily accumulating in Earth's atmosphere, and raised awareness that human-caused climate change was an ever-increasing threat to the stability of our climate. After Keeling's death in 2005, the measurements were continued by his son, Ralph F. Keeling. Support from NSF, NOAA and NASA is being diminished or withdrawn, and Keeling has turned to crowd-funding to help raise funds to continue these important measurements. I hope you can join me in making a donation.


Figure 1. The Keeling Curve: climate change's most iconic image. The curve's steady year-by-year increase in CO2 due to burning of coal, oil, and natural gas has wriggles on top of it, due to the natural seasonal cycle in CO2--plants suck in CO2 during the Northern Hemisphere growing season, then release it during the winter. Image credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USCD.


Figure 2. Dr. Charles Keeling posing at the entrance to the Charles Keeling Building at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

CO2 Levels Hit 401 ppm
The latest data from the Keeling curve website shows that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are surging upwards in their usual late winter push, as plants return CO2 to the atmosphere before the Northern Hemisphere spring growing season hits. CO2 levels reached 401 ppm (parts per million) last week on top of Mauna Loa, setting a new record. CO2 levels were at 280 ppm in 1870, increased less than 1 ppm per year in the 1960s, then accelerated to 2 ppm per year during the 2000s. Less than 1% of the increase since 1870 has been due to natural sources, such as volcanoes. The last time carbon dioxide levels reached 400 ppm—between 2.5 and 5 million years ago during the Pliocene Era—the Earth was 3.5 to 9° F warmer (2 to 5° C), and sea levels were 65 to 80 feet higher.

Links
There is a hashtag #savetheKeelingCurve
Eli Rabett's post, Shaking the Cup for Science
What Does 400 ppm Look Like? December 2013 blog post by Robert Monroe of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.




Senate holds all-nighter on climate change
A group of 31 U.S. Senators pulled an all-nighter last night on the floor of the U.S. Senate, taking turns from 9 pm Monday night until 9 am Tuesday morning to promote policy actions on climate change. Many of the Senators involved issued tweets using the hashtag #Up4Climate. The all-nighter was another indication that politicians are becoming increasingly bold about speaking up on climate change.

Latest Version of our WunderMap App Now Includes WunderPhotos
Weather Underground has released today a new version of our WunderMap app for iPhone and iPad. The main new feature that we'd like to highlight is the WunderPhotos layer--now users can view, share, and submit photos all from within the app. Here are a few of the features of the new version of the WunderMap app:

◦ Improved Weather Station display, and both station size and station spacing are now adjustable (Weather Stations Layer ⇒ Settings).
◦ New WunderPhotos layer! View, share, and submit beautiful weather photos.
◦ Fixed incorrect elevation for some Personal Weather Stations.
◦ Swipe-to-delete search history items.
◦ "Terrain/Satellite” and other map options made more prominent.
◦ Bug fixes (crashes, visual glitches, and usability enhancements).
◦ Optimized performance across all devices.


The latest version is available to download for iPhone and iPad at https://itunes.apple.com/app/wundermap/id364884105?mt=8.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting Naga5000:


It's part of UC San Diego, and if their budgeting is anything like the system in Florida, then that surplus money cannot be used outside of the department it was originally budgeted for.

Scripps had over $12 million in undesignated and unrestricted revenue. They can spend that on any program they chose, including the Mauna Loa site.

Scripps 2012 Annual Report
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Twitter is Down

Oh no, what will the twits do......
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.
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Quoting 123. jpsb:


I live in Texas I use less then 700KW of power a month. No heat in the winter except on really colds day a 500 watt space heater. No AC in the summer, I put a fan in the bedroom window. I put under 2,000 miles on my little 4 banger S10 pickup/year. Al Gore uses more carbon in a day then I use in a year.
Al Gore irritates me....He may mean well but he has a negative attitude for his good intentions.... I think Tipper was aware of his "small" failings....Just look at his goofy face.........Oooops.. Sorry
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Quoting 150. sar2401:

I saw that site, but all the alleged benefits for Alabama link back to Jacobson again. Offshore wind and tidal plants are supposed to supply 11% of our power needs. Where is the information on the costs to construct these and the environmental impacts? Where are nuke plants in this mix? It appears that, 2050, they will no longer be in operation. I want to believe plans like this will work but we also have to convince people that hold the purse strings that these benefits are real compared to the costs.


I agree completely. I would expect the website to be fully functional soon, after all they just pitched the massive proposal a few days ago.

Whatever side of the issue people fall on, one thing is for sure. Fossil fuels are finite. We need to diversify our energy production, so why not renewables?
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If anyone wants to discuss ENSO,you are free to go to my ENSO Blog.
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Quoting Naga5000:


Here's the link to the non profit Link I think these types of idea can really get us moving in the right direction. Seattle's plan to be carbon neutral by 2050 is another I have frequently posted and is very realistic. Link

I saw that site, but all the alleged benefits for Alabama link back to Jacobson again. Offshore wind and tidal plants are supposed to supply 11% of our power needs. Where is the information on the costs to construct these and the environmental impacts? Where are nuke plants in this mix? It appears that, 2050, they will no longer be in operation. I want to believe plans like this will work but we also have to convince people that hold the purse strings that these benefits are real compared to the costs.
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Quoting 144. Dakster:


Congrats.

Although, I don't want to be that uncomfortable with no A/C. Driving is a function of how far away you work and how far/often you need to get groceries, etc...


I walk to work. Takes me 15 minutes. The supermarket is a 10 minute walk.
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Quoting bappit:

I am not saying you are wrong about the facts, but I'll have to hold that decision in abeyance.

You really should cite sources for all those figures. It is inexcusable not to cite sources. Really.


Sorry, I meant to post the link to the annual report but overlooked it. A Google search for Scripps annual report brings it up as the first item.

Link
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Quoting GTstormChaserCaleb:
Wow the plot thickens. I just wonder if the pilots sensed something wrong with the plane and was looking for somewhere to land.

Mystery Malaysia flight may have been hundreds of miles off course

The Malaysian Air Force has traced the last known location of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 to a spot above Pulau Perak, a very small island in the Straits of Malacca and hundreds of miles from the usual Kuala Lumpur to Beijing flight path, according to a senior Malaysian Air Force official. The official declined to be named because he is not authorized to speak to the media.

If the Malaysian Air Force data cited by the source is correct, the aircraft was flying the opposite direction from its scheduled destination and on the opposite side of the Malay Peninsula from its scheduled route.

Once again, the anonymous source. If this was true, several things would have happened, The Malaysian Air Force would have scrambled fighters to intercept. The Malaysian Air Force has a considerable fleet of the latest Russian and US fighters, and they have intercepted other off-course aircraft. NORAD and the US Air Force would have also been in the loop if a commercial airliner was hundreds of miles off course and wasn't responding to radio calls. The ACARS system on the 777 would have been reporting this off-course flight as well. When and if this is confirmed by an official source the the mystery of MH370 would take on a completely different aspect.
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Quoting 145. PalmBeachWeather:
How are you Max...Lot's going on right now...Planning a big move. I will let everyone know if it happens...I am doing well . Stubbed my toe and cried but much better now.....LOL


Hope it works out well for you, PBW. :)
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Quoting 92. trHUrrIXC5MMX:

Sup Palm Beach!!
Long time no see you around
How are you Max...Lot's going on right now...Planning a big move. I will let everyone know if it happens...I am doing well . Stubbed my toe and cried but much better now.....LOL
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Quoting 123. jpsb:


I live in Texas I use less then 700KW of power a month. No heat in the winter except on really colds day a 500 watt space heater. No AC in the summer, I put a fan in the bedroom window. I put under 2,000 miles on my little 4 banger S10 pickup/year. Al Gore uses more carbon in a day then I use in a year.


Congrats.

Although, I don't want to be that uncomfortable with no A/C. Driving is a function of how far away you work and how far/often you need to get groceries, etc...
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Quoting 141. jpsb:
So what is your solution for that?

My solution? My solution is irrelevant to the fact that the problem exists. Asking me for a solution to a problem that you don't believe exists seems a bit...off, no?
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Quoting 139. sar2401:

I'm not a fan of Rush and certainly don't consider him an authoritative source on much, if anything. Upon reading the context of your link, I'm more than a little skeptical. This the same Mark Jacobsen who thinks 78,000 wind turbines off the Gulf was both practical and cost effective. I'd have to see the cost/benefit analysis of his renewable energy plan before I could comment on if it was really feasible.

His definition of renewable energy is certainly suspect. Hydropower is under constant attack from environmentalists because of things like killing fish habitat and destruction of riparian zones. Tidal power has lots of environmental issue, especially if used on a large scale. His contention that wind, water and solar energy to meet demand for electrical power 99.8 percent of the time in California is completely false. The current drought shows the unreliability of hydropower as a baseload generator. I haven't seen his plan for wind and solar, but there would need to be a massive increase in both to provide 99.8 percent of California's electrical demand.

I'm going to dig around and see if I can find the actual cost/benefit analysis. One thing pointed out in the article is the development of hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles. This really is a practical program, and way more work needs to be done to make fuel cell vehicles a reality. electric cars area dead end in terms of environmental impact and cost, but hydrogen fuels cells can do way more than power vehicles. I believe they would be a major contributor to reducing our carbon footprint.


Here's the link to the non profit Link I think these types of idea can really get us moving in the right direction. Seattle's plan to be carbon neutral by 2050 is another I have frequently posted and is very realistic. Link
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141. jpsb
Quoting 136. Birthmark:

We're at a record high for the number of human beings on Earth. I do believe that that's a rather important fact.

Oh, and all of them have to eat and drink.
So what is your solution for that?
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140. jpsb
Ok, fine, if you want to believe we are not in an ice age and that Greenland and Antarctic are not covered by a mile thick sheet of ice what is OK with me. Enjoy this brief warm interglacial.
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Quoting Naga5000:


That's a silly argument to make and a fallacious one at that. Rush is an entertainer and little more. 14% of all transport related CO2 is from airplanes, globally aviation accounts for 2% Link

As for real solutions, here is one from Stanford to get us carbon free by 2050 Link

There are real world solutions. For individuals the solutions are based in rational economics. I drive the most efficient car I can afford, I upgrade my home to use less power and be more efficient when I can, such as new windows, better attic insulation, etc., Rush's argument is incorrect.

I'm not a fan of Rush and certainly don't consider him an authoritative source on much, if anything. Upon reading the context of your link, I'm more than a little skeptical. This the same Mark Jacobsen who thinks 78,000 wind turbines off the Gulf was both practical and cost effective. I'd have to see the cost/benefit analysis of his renewable energy plan before I could comment on if it was really feasible.

His definition of renewable energy is certainly suspect. Hydropower is under constant attack from environmentalists because of things like killing fish habitat and destruction of riparian zones. Tidal power has lots of environmental issue, especially if used on a large scale. His contention that wind, water and solar energy to meet demand for electrical power 99.8 percent of the time in California is completely false. The current drought shows the unreliability of hydropower as a baseload generator. I haven't seen his plan for wind and solar, but there would need to be a massive increase in both to provide 99.8 percent of California's electrical demand.

I'm going to dig around and see if I can find the actual cost/benefit analysis. One thing pointed out in the article is the development of hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles. This really is a practical program, and way more work needs to be done to make fuel cell vehicles a reality. electric cars area dead end in terms of environmental impact and cost, but hydrogen fuels cells can do way more than power vehicles. I believe they would be a major contributor to reducing our carbon footprint.
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Weren't many Football games back then I spect.

: )
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Maybe you should read the entry your posting in.

As that helps a great deal.

CO2 Levels Hit 401 ppm

The latest data from the Keeling curve website shows that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are surging upwards in their usual late winter push, as plants return CO2 to the atmosphere before the Northern Hemisphere spring growing season hits. CO2 levels reached 401 ppm (parts per million) last week on top of Mauna Loa, setting a new record. CO2 levels were at 280 ppm in 1870, increased less than 1 ppm per year in the 1960s, then accelerated to 2 ppm per year during the 2000s. Less than 1% of the increase since 1870 has been due to natural sources, such as volcanoes.

The last time carbon dioxide levels reached 400 ppm—between 2.5 and 5 million years ago during the Pliocene Era—the Earth was 3.5 to 9° F warmer (2 to 5° C), and sea levels were 65 to 80 feet higher.


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Quoting 135. jpsb:

I was not claiming anything merely pointing out that we are at an historic low on atmospheric CO2 and we are in an ice age. Consequent? I don't know.

We're at a record high for the number of human beings on Earth. I do believe that that's a rather important fact.

Oh, and all of them have to eat and drink.
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135. jpsb
Quoting 131. Naga5000:


The fact is that it is well known the CO2 wasn't always the MAIN forcing in climate. Trying to post the graph and claim CO2 didn't drive climate then so it doesn't drive the climate now is dishonest and disingenuous because you lack the context needed to qualify WHY.

I was not claiming anything merely pointing out that we are at an historic low on atmospheric CO2 and we are in an ice age. Consequent? I don't know.
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What is the cause of glacial-interglacial cycles?

Variations in the Earth's orbit through time have changed the amount of solar radiation received by the Earth in each season (Figure 3). Interglacial periods, shown as the periods of higher temperature (shaded in yellow) in the Dome Fuji ice core from Antarctica, tend to happen during times of more intense summer solar radiation in the Northern Hemisphere.

These glacial-interglacial cycles have waxed and waned throughout the Quaternary Period (the past 1.8 million years). Since the middle Quaternary, glacial-interglacial cycles have had a frequency of about 100,000 years.

In the solar radiation time-series, cycles of this length (known as "eccentricity") are present but are weaker than cycles lasting about 23,000 years, (which are called "precession of the equinoxes.")

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Quoting 131. Naga5000:


The fact is that it is well known the CO2 wasn't always the MAIN forcing in climate. Trying to post the graph and claim CO2 didn't drive climate then so it doesn't drive the climate now is dishonest and disingenuous because you lack the context needed to qualify WHY.


hey, 4 billion years ago the earth was molten. betcha CO2 levels weren't too high back then! amirite?
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NOAA: Glacial-Interglacial cycles

Large, continental ice-sheets in the Northern Hemisphere have grown and retreated many times in the past. Times with large ice-sheets are known as glacial periods (or ice ages) and times without large ice-sheets are interglacial periods.

The most recent glacial period occurred between about 120,000 and 11,500 years ago. Since then, the Earth has been in an interglacial period called the Holocene (Figure 2). Glacial periods are colder, dustier and generally drier than interglacial periods.

These glacial-interglacial cycles are apparent in many marine and terrestrial paleoclimate records from around the world.
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Quoting 116. jpsb:

Irrelevant because you don't like it. Fact is we have less CO2 in the atmosphere now than at almost any other time in the history of the Earth and we are in an ICE AGE!


The fact is that it is well known the CO2 wasn't always the MAIN forcing in climate. Trying to post the graph and claim CO2 didn't drive climate then so it doesn't drive the climate now is dishonest and disingenuous because you lack the context needed to qualify WHY.
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psssst,

separated by interglacial events
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Quoting 119. sar2401:

I am not saying you are wrong about the facts, but I'll have to hold that decision in abeyance.

You really should cite sources for all those figures. It is inexcusable not to cite sources. Really.
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Wow the plot thickens. I just wonder if the pilots sensed something wrong with the plane and was looking for somewhere to land.

Mystery Malaysia flight may have been hundreds of miles off course

The Malaysian Air Force has traced the last known location of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 to a spot above Pulau Perak, a very small island in the Straits of Malacca and hundreds of miles from the usual Kuala Lumpur to Beijing flight path, according to a senior Malaysian Air Force official. The official declined to be named because he is not authorized to speak to the media.

If the Malaysian Air Force data cited by the source is correct, the aircraft was flying the opposite direction from its scheduled destination and on the opposite side of the Malay Peninsula from its scheduled route.
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127. jpsb
Quoting 122. Patrap:


Me thinks you may want to re-think the last.


From wiki


Quaternary glaciation also known as the Pleistocene glaciation or the CURRENT ICE AGE , refers to a series of glacial events separated by interglacial events during the Quaternary period from 2.58 Ma (million years ago) to PRESENT


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Quoting 119. sar2401:

It's not clear to me that two sites located within sight of one another, measuring exactly the same thing, has real value. The NOAA observatory measures every type of atmospheric gas that exists, including Co2. I haven't seen any evidence funding for the NOAA observatory is in danger. Scripps does valuable work in many areas, but they have an operating budget of $180 million, received over $11 million in donations in 2012, and has an endowment fund of almost $61 million. I can't find a report with enough detail to know how much the Mauna Loa facility costs but, in FY 10-11, they spent $104,000 on an Affirmative Action and Diversity program and had an operating surplus of $6.3 million dollars. It seems like there should be sufficient revenue to fund, what appeared to me, to be a relatively small operation on Mauna Loa.


It's part of UC San Diego, and if their budgeting is anything like the system in Florida, then that surplus money cannot be used outside of the department it was originally budgeted for.
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Quoting 116. jpsb:

Irrelevant because you don't like it. Fact is we have less CO2 in the atmosphere now than at almost any other time in the history of the Earth and we are in an ICE AGE!

Seriously? That's what you're going with? LOL

That graph is so ill-suited to the purpose you intend that it requires no answer aside from "LOL".
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Enjoying the Cold
By: Dr. Ricky Rood, 12:22 AM CST on March 04, 2014


The extraordinary string of months and years above the 20th century average will continue.

In a year, we will have gone 30 years, the official averaging time of climate, since we will have experienced a “cool” month.

This locally cold winter in the eastern U.S. is more like the late 1970s than the nineties in the comic above. A big difference is that this locally cold winter still does not affect the average enough to keep January 2014, globally, from being one of the warmest on record.
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123. jpsb
Quoting 114. AGWcreationists:


I'm an AGW skeptic and I will put up my carbon footprint against just about anyone here, save perhaps the younger students. Whatever I bring home in the way of supplies I haul in my backpack and duffle bag. Don't drive any more. Main cost to me is time - I could get to and from work in 40 minutes by car, it takes 90 to 120 minutes via walking and transit. I have that time, most younger families do not, the moms are hard-pressed to work and take car of the home and run the kids about. And I am only hauling food for myself, don't think the average mom could do that for a family of four.

Reducing the American carbon footprint significantly would require a fundamental restructuring of our society. And most of the rest of the world wants to catch up to where we are, not stand pat.


I live in Texas I use less then 700KW of power a month. No heat in the winter except on really colds day a 500 watt space heater. No AC in the summer, I put a fan in the bedroom window. I put under 2,000 miles on my little 4 banger S10 pickup/year. Al Gore uses more carbon in a day then I use in a year.
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Quoting 116. jpsb:

Irrelevant because you don't like it. Fact is we have less CO2 in the atmosphere now than at almost any other time in the history of the Earth and we are in an ICE AGE!


Me thinks you may want to re-think the last.
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Quoting 113. bappit:

Solubility changes with temperature but I would expect net outgassing to occur only after saturation is reached, so I do not see the oceans as a source of atmospheric CO2. That said there may be less CO2 uptake into warm surface waters, more uptake into cold surface waters. It is fun to speculate along with you.


The ocean is always at or near its saturation point. If you look at a table of global annual SST anomalies, high values are almost always associated with a surge in atmospheric CO2 the following year. Low values with a relatively small increase.
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Quoting 116. jpsb:

Irrelevant because you don't like it. Fact is we have less CO2 in the atmosphere now than at almost any other time in the history of the Earth and we are in an ICE AGE!


ice age
only ice on earth more than a mile thick is Greenland and Antarctica for now anyway

and we got plans for Greenland
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Quoting Treehorn:


The NOAA will continue to monitor atmospheric CO2 concentration as they have done since the 70's. The program Dr. Masters references is a separate program that performs the same task. What will be lost, if the program does not get funding, is essentially a second independent review of atmospheric CO2 concentration. That has some value. Just wanted to clarify...

In this case the budget hawks seem to be targeting the duplicated effort.


It's not clear to me that two sites located within sight of one another, measuring exactly the same thing, has real value. The NOAA observatory measures every type of atmospheric gas that exists, including Co2. I haven't seen any evidence funding for the NOAA observatory is in danger. Scripps does valuable work in many areas, but they have an operating budget of $180 million, received over $11 million in donations in 2012, and has an endowment fund of almost $61 million. I can't find a report with enough detail to know how much the Mauna Loa facility costs but, in FY 10-11, they spent $104,000 on an Affirmative Action and Diversity program and had an operating surplus of $6.3 million dollars. It seems like there should be sufficient revenue to fund, what appeared to me, to be a relatively small operation on Mauna Loa.
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The last time carbon dioxide levels reached 400 ppm between 2.5 and 5 million years ago during the Pliocene Era the Earth was 3.5 to 9 F warmer (2 to 5 C), and sea levels were 65 to 80 feet higher.


And looking at the image end, note the Fossil Fuel Era angle up.

...as compared thru the Holocene.

Extract that "curve" another 500 years..

And get back to me.
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Quoting 71. Dakster:
I know 400 ppm is a record for modern times. But is that a tipping point line in the sand, once it is crossed?

I can see the need for a house boat if I want to stay in Florida.


tipping point soon

mom will let us know

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116. jpsb
Quoting 112. Naga5000:


Irrelevant, without any consideration for historical context such as land mass location, size, ocean size, mechanisms by which the CO2 transport cycle behaved, those numbers mean nothing. Context is your friend.

Irrelevant because you don't like it. Fact is we have less CO2 in the atmosphere now than at almost any other time in the history of the Earth and we are in an ICE AGE!
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#112

Indeed, that never ceases to amaze me, as when in the Worlds Historical Past, did we ever see a Life form extract fossil fuels, Burn, and terra-form the Bio-sphere ?

Answer: never

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127536
Quoting 93. LargoFl:
just heard on Rush,that a single jet airliner puts out enourmous amounts of CO2 on each flight...are we demanding that the arilines shut down in the global warming fight to keep the earth cooler?...will those who are premoting glbal warming not ever take a flight again?...now lets get to the SUV's and trucks...will everyone get rid of them?...you see folks..talk is cheap..when it comes to the actual giving up things..people wont..its human nature i guess..its why this GW fight will never win..relax..build higher sea walls up and down the coasts lol..its about all we can do..no wait...you cant block my ocean view with that high wall...you see what i mean..........


I'm an AGW skeptic and I will put up my carbon footprint against just about anyone here, save perhaps the younger students. Whatever I bring home in the way of supplies I haul in my backpack and duffle bag. Don't drive any more. Main cost to me is time - I could get to and from work in 40 minutes by car, it takes 90 to 120 minutes via walking and transit. I have that time, most younger families do not, the moms are hard-pressed to work and take car of the home and run the kids about. And I am only hauling food for myself, don't think the average mom could do that for a family of four.

Reducing the American carbon footprint significantly would require a fundamental restructuring of our society. And most of the rest of the world wants to catch up to where we are, not stand pat.
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Quoting 105. yonzabam:
Figure 1. The Keeling Curve: climate change's most iconic image. The curve's steady year-by-year increase in CO2 due to burning of coal, oil, and natural gas has wriggles on top of it, due to the natural seasonal cycle in CO2--plants suck in CO2 during the Northern Hemisphere growing season, then release it during the winter.

True, and this is always the explanation which is given for the 'saw tooth' curve. However, warm water outgasses CO2, while cold water absorbs it.

During the northern hemisphere winter, the southern ocean warms up, so there must also be a net input of CO2 from that source.

Solubility changes with temperature but I would expect net outgassing to occur only after saturation is reached, so I do not see the oceans as a source of atmospheric CO2. That said there may be less CO2 uptake into warm surface waters, more uptake into cold surface waters. It is fun to speculate along with you.
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Quoting 111. jpsb:


Irrelevant, without any consideration for historical context such as land mass location, size, ocean size, mechanisms by which the CO2 transport cycle behaved, other forcings, those numbers mean nothing. Context is your friend.
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111. jpsb
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Quoting 93. LargoFl:
just heard on Rush,that a single jet airliner puts out enourmous amounts of CO2 on each flight...are we demanding that the arilines shut down in the global warming fight to keep the earth cooler?...will those who are premoting glbal warming not ever take a flight again?...now lets get to the SUV's and trucks...will everyone get rid of them?...you see folks..talk is cheap..when it comes to the actual giving up things..people wont..its human nature i guess..its why this GW fight will never win..relax..build higher sea walls up and down the coasts lol..its about all we can do..no wait...you cant block my ocean view with that high wall...you see what i mean..........


That's a silly argument to make and a fallacious one at that. Rush is an entertainer and little more. 14% of all transport related CO2 is from airplanes, globally aviation accounts for 2% Link

As for real solutions, here is one from Stanford to get us carbon free by 2050 Link

There are real world solutions. For individuals the solutions are based in rational economics. I drive the most efficient car I can afford, I upgrade my home to use less power and be more efficient when I can, such as new windows, better attic insulation, etc., Rush's argument is incorrect.
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Quoting 71. Dakster:
I know 400 ppm is a record for modern times. But is that a tipping point line in the sand, once it is crossed?

I can see the need for a house boat if I want to stay in Florida.

Seeing as it looks like the CO2 will be here for hundreds of years (more than 1000 years actually), I think the tipping point idea is misleading.
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Hi nrt. New file by ATCF for 2014 is up.
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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