New Blast of Cold Air Invades Midwest U.S.

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:31 PM GMT on February 26, 2014

Share this Blog
47
+

A frigid blast of Arctic air will bring some of the coldest late February temperatures seen in decades to the eastern 2/3 of the U.S. this week, with temperatures 15 - 30° below normal commonplace. The cold air isn't going anywhere fast, and will stick around through early next week. The cold blast is due to an extreme jet stream pattern we have seen before this winter--a sharp ridge of high pressure over California, and a large trough of low pressure over Eastern North America. This upper air pattern was described by the National Weather Service in Buffalo, New York on Tuesday as one that occurs less than once every 30 years in late February. The intense cold is already affecting the Upper Midwest this Wednesday morning. My vote for worst winter weather of the day goes to Central Minnesota at Alexandria, where a temperature of -8°F this morning combined with winds of 14 mph to make a wind chill of -28°. The winds are expected to increase to 25 - 30 mph Wednesday afternoon with higher gusts, creating blizzard conditions. In Chicago, the intense cold is expected to put the December - February average temperature for this winter below 19°, making the winter of 2013 - 2014 the 3rd coldest winter in the Windy City's history. Only the winters of 1978 - 1979 and 1903 - 1904 were colder.


Figure 1. Great Lake ice cover as seen on February 19, 2014, by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. Ice cover on North America’s Great Lakes reached 88 percent in mid-February 2014—levels not observed since 1994. The average maximum ice extent since 1973 is just over 50 percent. It has surpassed 80 percent just five times in four decades. The lowest average ice extent occurred in 2002, when only 9.5 percent of the lakes froze. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

Rain coming to California
Unlike previous versions of this extreme jet stream pattern, though, the ridge over the Western U.S. will not be very persistent. The ridge of high pressure over California, which brought numerous record high temperatures for the date on Tuesday, will get broken down by a weak low pressure system on Wednesday and Thursday. On Friday and Saturday, a more intense storm system will smash through the ridge, bringing moderate to heavy rain to much of drought-parched California. This storm will then track eastwards, potentially bringing a major snowstorm and destructive ice storm on Monday to Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, and portions of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast U.S.


Figure 2. Departure of temperature from average at 2 meters (6.6') as diagnosed by the GFS model at 00 UTC February 26, 2014. A negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) created a sharp kink in the jet stream (Figure 3), which allowed cold air to spill southwards out of the Arctic over the Eastern U.S. Compensating warm air flowed northwards into the Arctic underneath ridges of high pressure over Alaska and Europe. Data/image obtained using Climate Reanalyzer™ (http://cci-reanalyzer.org), Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine.


Figure 3. Winds at a height where the pressure is 250 mb show the axis of the jet stream, seen here at 00 UTC February 26, 2014. A sharp trough of low pressure was present over the Eastern U.S., and unusually strong ridges of high pressure were over the Western U.S. and the North Atlantic. Data/image obtained using Climate Reanalyzer™ (http://cci-reanalyzer.org), Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, Maine.

Wanted: professionals willing to speak about climate change to local groups
If you are a professional or graduate student with a strong background in climate science, the world needs you to reach out to local audiences at schools, retirement homes, the Chamber of Commerce, etc., and share your expertise. A new initiative by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and the United Nations Foundation called climatevoices.org is launching a Science Speakers Network this spring, with the goal of bringing scientists and their local communities together for real dialogue on climate science that speaks to citizens’ current and future well-being and responsibility as members of a community and democracy. Materials for context-setting presentations will be offered as will coaching regarding how to begin conversations about climate change with fellow citizens. If you are interested in volunteering for this network, please go to climatevoices.org and create a profile.  Profiles will “go public” when the full web site is launched in April. Once you create a profile, you will be kept up to date on Climate Voices progress including construction of the full web site, availability of presentation materials, webinar coaching, and plans for project launch. For any questions, please contact: Cindy Schmidt (UCAR), cschmidt@ucar.edu. I have my own set of slides I use for such talks that anyone is welcome to borrow from, available at http://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/2013/climatetalk.ppt.

Jeff Masters

Snowy Friday (Beaker)
After a major winter storm in the Twin Cities area, I spent Friday afternoon capturing a glimpse of the beauty left in the aftermath of the storm.
Snowy Friday

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 389 - 339

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

389. AlwaysThinkin
11:08 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 383. TroutMadness:
Ok all, i have a question. It maybe stupid. With all the burning of fuels extracted from the ground what is happening to the volume of gases produced?
Is it being absorbed by the bodies of water around the globe


Not a stupid question at all. Currently the big absorber of CO2 are the oceans which when it mixes into the ocean water it becomes carbonic acid lowering the PH. Dunno about smaller bodies of water like ponds, lakes or seas that don't border the ocean though. Maybe someone more knowledgeable could answer that.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 394
388. PedleyCA
11:08 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 374. Dakster:
Pedley for you it is lunchtime right?


3PM
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5771
387. Doppler22
11:06 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 386. pablosyn:
Guys, wasn't just a waterspout. Was FOUR (4) waterspout in Porto Alegre LOL. All of them lasted for 2 to 3 minutes. In different places.

Sounds like the coastline of Florida in one hour.

/avoids being hit my tomatoes for horrible joke.
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 3727
386. pablosyn
11:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Guys, wasn't just a waterspout. Was FOUR (4) waterspout in Porto Alegre LOL. All of them lasted for 2 to 3 minutes. In different places.
Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 207
385. Doppler22
11:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 380. nwobilderburg:


So guys ...which is more reliable
GFS
GEM
or NAM

cause the gfs gives like half the rain of the other 2 models. Which is the most realistic

One meteorologist I follow loves the GEM model. It has been very accurate for my area at least. :p

EDIT: Hydrus is right though, they all have strong and weak points
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 3727
384. nwobilderburg
11:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 382. hydrus:
They all have there strong and weak points. If I had to pick, the GFS.

thanks
Member Since: October 6, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 741
383. TroutMadness
11:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Ok all, i have a question. It maybe stupid. With all the burning of fuels extracted from the ground what is happening to the volume of gases produced?
Is it being absorbed by the bodies of water around the globe
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 63
382. hydrus
11:01 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 380. nwobilderburg:


So guys ...which is more reliable
GFS
GEM
or NAM

cause the gfs gives like half the rain of the other 2 models. Which is the most realistic
They all have there strong and weak points. If I had to pick, the GFS.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
381. hydrus
11:00 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 378. Doppler22:

I know this isn't Brazil, but doesn't Argentina get a fair amount of tornadoes?
They do. In fact, they get a lot of the same weather we do here. There climate ranges from subtropical in the north to subpolar in the far south. In many ways similar to the U.S.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
380. nwobilderburg
11:00 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 369. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
hires nam 18z run hr 60 end of run



So guys ...which is more reliable
GFS
GEM
or NAM

cause the gfs gives like half the rain of the other 2 models. Which is the most realistic
Member Since: October 6, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 741
379. bjrabbit
10:59 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 201. luvtogolf:


Another personal attack. I tried asking those questions and got ripped. And you wonder why?


Hang in their luvtogolf...most of the most vicious people on this blog who brag about science and papers and such most likely have never even passed Calculus I so all they are doing is parroting their beliefs through the work of others, who, if they got into the meat of the work, would not understand a dang thing.

Speaking of golf, luvtogolf, I have been in the golf car industry most of my life. Despite the best technology Detroit and Japan have to offer, nobody has made an electric car battery/charging system that can endure the day in day out punishment that an fossil fuel powered car can take. How do I know this? Well, these dolts test out a lot of their theories in the golf car/low speed vehicle industry.

Furthermore, ask you local country club what it costs to charge their electric cars...it's a lot. And, it all comes from fossil fuel powered plants...which, when I see an electric car on the road, it makes me laugh my butt off.

There are a couple of us sane ones who keep trying out here....Dr Masters is interesting but I am amused how he plans on going down with the AGW ship.

Bert
Member Since: March 16, 2002 Posts: 0 Comments: 100
378. Doppler22
10:53 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 377. hydrus:
Brazil is becoming more like the U.S. East Coast by the day..Add a cat-4 and were almost complete.

I know this isn't Brazil, but doesn't Argentina get a fair amount of tornadoes?
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 3727
377. hydrus
10:52 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 375. pablosyn:
Guys, today a waterspout hits the Guaiba Lake in Porto Alegre, Brazil. LOL

Brazil is becoming more like the U.S. East Coast by the day..Add a cat-4 and were almost complete.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
376. hydrus
10:50 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 371. PedleyCA:


Be careful, you are dating yourself with the Zippo comment.
I am not following you with the dating myself comment. Should I take a cold shower, or throw off my intense love for me..:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
375. pablosyn
10:50 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Guys, today a waterspout hits the Guaiba Lake in Porto Alegre, Brazil. LOL

Member Since: October 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 207
374. Dakster
10:49 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Pedley for you it is lunchtime right?
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10091
373. PedleyCA
10:37 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Time for the Dinner-Supper Lull...
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5771
372. barbamz
10:30 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Mozambique: Licungo Floods Destroyed Over 1,300 Homes
26 February 2014
Maputo — Last week's flooding in Namacurra and Maganja da Costa districts in the central Mozambican province of Zambezia destroyed 1,340 houses, the spokesperson for the Mozambican government, Deputy Foreign Minister Henrique Banze, told reporters on Tuesday.
Torrential rains caused the Licungo river to burst its banks, submerging over 7,000 hectares of crops, 6,500 of which are regarded as lost. The floods had inundated 5,000 houses, 450 classrooms and seven health units. Roads in the two districts had become impassable. ...



Mozambique. (Flooding probably due to the last cyclone between Madagascar and Mozambique. Can't remember its name though ;-)

Good night with this from uneventful Germany - weatherwise. But carnival weekend is ahead, so no boredom!
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 53 Comments: 5918
371. PedleyCA
10:26 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 355. hydrus:
This is not GW..I see Patrick Moore down there with his Zippo.


Be careful, you are dating yourself with the Zippo comment.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5771
370. Guysgal
10:08 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Speaking of winter here's a chilling article (LOL) on Nuclear Winter in China due to such severe pollution Link
Member Since: May 9, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 218
369. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:07 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 60 end of run

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
368. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:06 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 57

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
367. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:06 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 54

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
366. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 51
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
365. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 48 end

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
364. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:05 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 45

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
363. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 42

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
362. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 39

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
361. sar2401
10:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting hydrus:
This is not GW..I see Patrick Moore down there with his Zippo.

Let me see if I have this straight. It took a scientific study to prove warm air melts glaciers? I don't know how much the study cost but I would have done it for half.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
360. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
10:04 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
hires nam 18z run hr 36

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53570
359. sar2401
10:01 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting barbamz:


Well then, relocate some of your Rocky Mountains, lol.

I'm sorry, Barb, but relocating the Rocky Mountains to North Dakota would negatively affect their only other tourist attraction...blizzards. It'll have to be the wall or nothing. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
358. Patrap
10:01 PM GMT on February 26, 2014

Getty Image

Effects of smog akin to ‘nuclear winter’

Toxic air pollution in China impeding photosynthesis and could seriously affect country’s food supply, experts warn

27 Feb 2014

BEIJING — Scientists in China have warned that the country’s toxic air pollution is now so bad that it resembles a nuclear winter, slowing photosynthesis in plants — and potentially wreaking havoc on the country’s food supply.

Beijing and broad swathes of six northern provinces have spent the past week blanketed in a dense smog that is not expected to abate until today. Beijing’s concentration of PM2.5 particles — those small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs and enter the bloodstream — hit 541 micrograms per cubic metre yesterday afternoon, or “beyond index”, according to a United States Embassy pollution monitor, before falling to 165 in the “unhealthy” range last night.

The World Health Organization recommends a safe level of 25; the last time PM2.5 dropped below 150 in Beijing was on Feb 19.

Ms He Dongxian, an associate professor at China Agricultural University’s College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, said new research suggested that if the smog persists, Chinese agriculture will face conditions “somewhat similar to a nuclear winter”. She has demonstrated that air pollutants adhere to greenhouse surfaces, cutting the amount of light inside by about 50 per cent and severely impeding photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert light into life-sustaining chemical energy.

She tested the hypothesis by growing one group of chilli and tomato seeds under artificial lab light, and another under a suburban Beijing greenhouse. In the lab, the seeds sprouted in 20 days; in the greenhouse, they took more than two months. “They will be lucky to live at all,” Ms He told the South China Morning Post newspaper.

She warned that if the pollution does not ease, China’s agricultural production could be seriously affected. “Now almost every farm is caught in a smog panic,” she said.

The Chinese government has repeatedly promised to address the problem, but enforcement remains patchy. In October, Beijing introduced a system of emergency measures if pollution levels remained hazardous for three consecutive days, including closing schools, shutting some factories, and restricting the use of government cars. According to China’s state newswire Xinhua, 147 industrial companies in Beijing have cut or suspended production. Yet schools stayed open and government cars remained on the road.

The heavy smog in the capital may draw new scrutiny to government pledges to ease pollution around the country as leaders gather for the annual meeting of China’s legislature, the National People’s Congress, which begins next Wednesday. At the end of last year’s event, Premier Li Keqiang promised to clean up pollution and said smog gave him a “heavy heart”.

One person not put off by the smog was President Xi Jinping, who made an unannounced visit on Tuesday to a trendy area popular with tourists. The visit prompted approving coverage in Chinese news reports, but also mockery on social media sites. “Xi Jinping visits Beijing’s Nanluoguxiang amid the smog: Breathing together, sharing the fate,” said a Xinhua headline.

Mr Li Guixin, a resident of Shijiazhuang, capital of Hebei province near Beijing, has sued the local environmental protection bureau for failing to rein in the smog, saying it owed him the 10,000 yuan (S$2,065) he spent on an air purifier, masks and a treadmill to exercise indoors. He is the first person to sue the government over pollution.

Ms Li Yan, a climate and energy expert at Greenpeace East Asia, said the case could bring exposure to polluted cities outside of Beijing. She said: “People ... in Beijing are suffering from polluted air, but we have the attention of domestic and international media. Shi-jiazhuang’s environmental problems are far more serious and this case could bring Shijiazhuang the attention it has deserved for a long time.” AGENCIES
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127832
357. barbamz
9:59 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
356. sar2401
9:58 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting presslord:



as a general rule...I prefer you all leave attempts at humor on the blog to me...in this case, however, I'm afraid I am forced to give this comment my highest blessing...

Why thank you, Press. I'm sorry for violating a cardinal rule but happy that you are giving me dispensation this one time. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
355. hydrus
9:57 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 353. Patrap:

Photographer: Gary Braasch/Zuma Press
Qori Kalis glacier flowing from Quelccaya Ice Field in Peru.


Peru Glacier Retreat Caused by Rising Temperatures, Study Finds

By Jeremy van Loon Feb 25, 2014 4:22 PM CT

Peru’s Quelccaya ice cap, the world’s largest tropical ice sheet, is shrinking because of rising temperatures, according to a study by Dartmouth College.

Dartmouth’s research suggests “that these tropical glaciers are shrinking very rapidly today because of a warming climate,” said Meredith Kelly, one of the study’s authors, in a preview of the paper.

The rapid retreat of the Peruvian glacier, which sits at 18,000 feet (5,486 meters) in the Andes, has resulted in a debate about whether temperature, precipitation or other factors were causing the decline in ice mass, according to the study. Nine mountain ranges around the world lost on average 0.6 meters of water equivalent in the 2011-2012 season, according to the most recent figures available by the World Glacier Monitoring Service.

Justin Stroup and Kelly of Hanover, New Hampshire-based Dartmouth College compared the retreat of a glacier that emerges from the ice cap with annually dated ice-core records to establish a connection between temperature and the long-term fluctuations of the ice sheet, according to the study published today in the journal Geology.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jeremy van Loon in Calgary at jvanloon@bloomberg.net
This is not GW..I see Patrick Moore down there with his Zippo.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
354. sar2401
9:56 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting Dakster:


So we can wall off Texas (basically) with a 1,000 Foot Wall - 150 Feet thick. But we can't build a wall along the US/Mexico border.

I know it is just a proposal. But did anyone really think about this, before suggesting it???

That's what I don't get. The wall builder guy is an actual physicist working for a well-known university (Temple). He's presenting this paper before the American Physical Society, a well know, generally non-nutty science group. His work was paid for with taxpayer money from the US Naval Lab. Didn't anyone along the line think this idea was bonkers and try to stop it? This story is now being picked up by media all over the world, and other scientists are chiming in on why the wall thing won't work. Can't any of them see they are just giving this thing legs. Really, what the heck is wrong with people now?
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
353. Patrap
9:54 PM GMT on February 26, 2014

Photographer: Gary Braasch/Zuma Press
Qori Kalis glacier flowing from Quelccaya Ice Field in Peru.


Peru Glacier Retreat Caused by Rising Temperatures, Study Finds

By Jeremy van Loon Feb 25, 2014 4:22 PM CT

Peru’s Quelccaya ice cap, the world’s largest tropical ice sheet, is shrinking because of rising temperatures, according to a study by Dartmouth College.

Dartmouth’s research suggests “that these tropical glaciers are shrinking very rapidly today because of a warming climate,” said Meredith Kelly, one of the study’s authors, in a preview of the paper.

The rapid retreat of the Peruvian glacier, which sits at 18,000 feet (5,486 meters) in the Andes, has resulted in a debate about whether temperature, precipitation or other factors were causing the decline in ice mass, according to the study. Nine mountain ranges around the world lost on average 0.6 meters of water equivalent in the 2011-2012 season, according to the most recent figures available by the World Glacier Monitoring Service.

Justin Stroup and Kelly of Hanover, New Hampshire-based Dartmouth College compared the retreat of a glacier that emerges from the ice cap with annually dated ice-core records to establish a connection between temperature and the long-term fluctuations of the ice sheet, according to the study published today in the journal Geology.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jeremy van Loon in Calgary at jvanloon@bloomberg.net
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127832
352. presslord
9:53 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 345. sar2401:

I wonder if this guy and wall builder guy had lunch together, or what? This sounds like a giant conspiracy to me, since both projects would corner the world supply of everything except Silly Putty and Twinkies. :-)



as a general rule...I prefer you all leave attempts at humor on the blog to me...in this case, however, I'm afraid I am forced to give this comment my highest blessing...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10484
351. mfount
9:53 PM GMT on February 26, 2014
Quoting 304. StormTrackerScott:


I really wish we would get some below average temps as far south as C & S FL as it has been very warm lately.

I can ship you all of the cold air you want!! I wish we knew what it was like to be above normal.
Member Since: February 6, 2003 Posts: 1 Comments: 18
Cool light rain all day. Temp range today so far is 54/59. It has been 55 since 11 a.m.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 345. sar2401:

I wonder if this guy and wall builder guy had lunch together, or what? This sounds like a giant conspiracy to me, since both projects would corner the world supply of everything except Silly Putty and Twinkies. :-)
Its The Universal Field thing..Everything is connected from one place to another..Even thoughts, regardless of who put them there...This however also lends credence to great minds think alike.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
Quoting 347. sar2401:

And all three make good tourist attractions too, Barb. Maybe this guy is on to something. North Dakota can use every bit of help it can get when it comes to tourist attractions. :-)


Well then, relocate some of your Rocky Mountains, lol.
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 53 Comments: 5918
Quoting barbamz:


Nice suggestion. A lot of precursors. Just build a little higher, lol.


Berlin (earlier)


Roman "Limes" in Germany, more earlier, lol.


China, most earliest (started in the 7th century BC).

And all three make good tourist attractions too, Barb. Maybe this guy is on to something. North Dakota can use every bit of help it can get when it comes to tourist attractions. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
Quoting 338. Dakster:


So we can wall off Texas (basically) with a 1,000 Foot Wall - 150 Feet thick. But we can't build a wall along the US/Mexico border.

I know it is just a proposal. But did anyone really think about this, before suggesting it???
Some fecund genius is behind it...It is amazing the things get printed for public digest.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
Quoting hydrus:
At roughly $3 million a piece, it comes out at $234 billion...No problem..

I wonder if this guy and wall builder guy had lunch together, or what? This sounds like a giant conspiracy to me, since both projects would corner the world supply of everything except Silly Putty and Twinkies. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
Quoting 338. Dakster:


So we can wall off Texas (basically) with a 1,000 Foot Wall - 150 Feet thick. But we can't build a wall along the US/Mexico border.

I know it is just a proposal. But did anyone really think about this, before suggesting it???


Nice suggestion. A lot of precursors. Just build a little higher, lol.


Berlin (earlier)


Roman "Limes" in Germany, *more* earlier.


China, *most* earliest (started in the 7th century BC).
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 53 Comments: 5918
Climate Change Is Increasing Extreme Heat Globally

Published: February 26th, 2014

Despite reports of a global warming "hiatus," a new study shows that the number of areas being affected by extreme heat are on the rise and that the hottest temperatures on the planet are also increasing.

The idea of a hiatus comes from reports of recent slowing in the rise of the globe’s average temperature. But average temperature is only one measure of the state of the Earth’s climate, and in some ways, it’s a rather poor one. After all, nobody actually experiences the planet’s average temperature.


Extreme heat and dry conditions have helped lower Lake Mead's water level precipitously. New research shows more areas around the globe have experienced extremely high temperatures and those temperatures are on the rise since 1997.
Credit: ChrisMRichards/Flickr


Extreme temperatures are another metric, one that’s much more pertinent to people’s lives and livelihoods. Higher temperatures can reduce crop yields and drive up energy usage. And heat waves are the No. 1 weather-related killer in the U.S. There is evidence that suggests heat waves are becoming more likely due to climate change. Analyses of heat waves in Russia in 2010, Texas in 2011, and Australia in 2012 have all indicated that climate change played a role in making these events more likely.

In a commentary published in Nature Climate Change on Wednesday, researchers looked at changes in the prevalence of extremely high temperatures over land since 1979. Their analysis runs through 2012, the last year for which data are available.

“This study shows that the frequency of hot extremes over land has continued to increase in the last 15 years, despite an apparent stabilization of the global mean temperature,” study lead author and ETH Zurich researcher Sonia Seneviratne said in an email.

To perform the analysis, two datasets were used to essentially divvy the globe’s land into grids and then look at shifts in the number of areas experiencing 30 days of extreme heat per year compared to the 1979-2010 average. The study defined extreme heat as daily temperatures in the top 10 percent for a given area.

RELATED Hansen Study: Extreme Weather Tied to Climate Change
Global Warming Behind Australia’s ‘Angry Summer’: Study
Small Volcanic Eruptions Add to Larger Impact on Climate
The study shows that in some years, natural variability gives extreme high temperatures a boost. During 1997 and El Niño years, there are noticeably more places with 30 hot days, which may be expected since El Niño tends to drive global temperatures up, too. However, the upward trend of extreme temperatures in both datasets is in line with projections that show extreme and record high temperatures and the number of heat wave days are likely to increase in many regions of the world due to climate change.

Seneviratne and her colleagues also looked to see at how temperatures above the 95th percentile have changed since 1997, a period that coincides with the reported slow down in global warming.

In spring, summer, and fall, most parts of the globe have seen extreme temperatures rise even more. Parts of Europe, South America, and the eastern U.S. have seen the most consistent rise across all three seasons. Extreme high temperatures have increased by up to 2.7°F per decade in those areas.

Winter is the one seasonal exception where extreme heat has taken a nosedive in widespread areas. In much of Russia, Canada, and the eastern U.S., extreme high temperatures have actually cooled by 2.7°F or more per decade. That is somewhat offset by parts of the Southwest U.S., Africa and South America seeing increases of a similar magnitude. Previous research has shown that winter cooling is the biggest seasonal chunk of the global warming slow down when looking at the globe’s average temperatures.

Regional differences are also noticeable when looking at annual changes. In much of South America, Europe, and the Arctic and Greenland, extreme temperatures have increased by as much as 2.7°F per decade. Much of the U.S. has seen the hottest of the hot temperatures increase 0.9°F to 1.8°F per decade. Interestingly, cold extremes across the globe are also getting colder but the trend is not nearly as strong.

“The reasons for the stronger increase of hot extremes compared to mean temperature over land is not totally clear,” Seneviratne said.

An increase in dry conditions in some regions of the globe could be triggering the rise in temperatures, she said. Drought and heat tend to work in concert. Dry conditions mean soil can’t “sweat” and reduce the surrounding air temperatures, which can trigger a warming and drying feedback loop similar to what played out in 2012 when a historic drought spread across the U.S.

Though this study only includes data through 2012, record heat has been a recurring theme throughout the globe since then. High temperature records were set in Alaska and Siberia in the summer of 2013. And 2014 began with heat waves in Australia, Argentina and Brazil, while Western Europe has seen record or near-record warmth.

“Previous studies have discussed the global mean temperature hiatus and possible causes,” said Markus Donat, a postdoctoral researcher at Australia’s Climate Change Research Centre who also worked on the study. “We show that the ‘hiatus’ is no general phenomenon. We don't see it when looking at the upper tail of the temperature distribution.”

Peter Stott, the head of climate monitoring and attribution at the U.K. Met Office, also agreed the study showed the concept of a hiatus is overblown.

“This paper provides additional evidence that the importance of the so-called ‘hiatus’ in global mean temperatures has been exaggerated in some quarters,” he said in an email. “In fact, additional energy continues to be accumulated in the climate system as a result of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and this is causing many changes in climate, which have continued unabated.”

Understanding the cause for the relative plateau in the Earth’s average temperature is still an important scientific undertaking since it will ultimately help researchers improve models and understand how different factors affect the climate system.

But it’s also clear that other signs of climate change are continuing to occur, including increases in extreme temperatures, rapid loss of Arctic sea ice, and more extreme precipitation events. Understanding and documenting those changes provide important information about what adaptations are needed to cope with changing extremes.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127832
Quoting SkulDouggery:
Ok so this guy is a turn coat of whatever. And his opinion makes no difference. Not scientific - yada yada yada....
Why is he testifying in front of a senate committee?
Not trying to be cute (like so many here), but seriously why is the senate wasting the time on the floor?

From a copy of his testimony before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight:

Attached please find the chapter on climate change from my book, "Confessions of a
Greenpeace Dropout: The Making of a Sensible Environmentalist". I would request it
be made part of the record.


Not a bad way to get free publicity for your book.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472
Quoting 339. sar2401:

Considering that we'd have to use three times the world's known supply of aggregates we should get something off just for cornering the market. :-)
Absolutely...and any subsidies therein...
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
Quoting 332. presslord:
OK...while we're at itLink
At roughly $3 million a piece, it comes out at $234 billion...No problem..
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21032
Quoting hydrus:
And that is if we get it 50% off...

Considering that we'd have to use three times the world's known supply of aggregates we should get something off just for cornering the market. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14472

Viewing: 389 - 339

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
82 °F
Mostly Cloudy